Woodster Bikes Front.ighmw

It seems that wood bikes are the new thing that every designer wants to solve, and they all do it a little different. Woodster departs from the idea of craftsman putting a lot of hours into a piece of art, and takes a technological approach, CNC machining them into hollow structures to build a precise, consistently manufactured frame.

They say one of their reasons for using wood is that it is eco friendly, and they say buying a Woodster keeps 14kg of CO2 from the atmosphere, since wood is natural storage for CO2 pulled from the air by the living tree. We think it would actually reduce quite a bit more than that when you factor in the energy used to do heat treatment and welding on a steel frame.

Check out a few shots and a video of the swoopy cellulose rides after the jump…

Woodster

With a pretty simple parts kit, the bike sells for $1,200, but is not available to the United States. Made in Slovenia, they say that since their country is covered more than half by woods, this is an easy resource to start with.

www.woodsterbikes.com

9 COMMENTS

  1. “We think it would actually reduce quite a bit more than that when you factor in the energy used to do heat treatment and welding on a steel frame.”

    And what, this wood, after dying, walks to the CNC, self machines using energy by burning itself and then walks to the store for sale?
    I’ll stay open minded though and would like to at least see the 14 kg calculation.

    Anyway, that doesn’t matter. Seems a neat product even if made of baby condor wings.

  2. JBikes…this would surely product less emissions. Unless of course, the wood is being shipped from the other side of the planet(its not). Also, a CNC machine doesn’t use as much power as you may think, especially if its machining wood instead of steel/aluminum.

    That said, who knows what the longevity of one of these things are. I’d like to see how if flexes after 50,000miles or more.

  3. Yes, a CNC uses little relative power, and ironically, it could probably be powered off a welder generator…
    I don’t doubt the bike is more environmentally friendly, but I do think some of the numbers thrown around aren’t always comparing apples to apples and these numbers are very hard to get to begin with.

  4. It’s a pretty cool bike as far as wood bikes go. But I don’t think you can claim/market the eco benefits of building a “wood” bike, without addressing the adhesives used in the plywood it is actually made from. Many of the adhesives commonly used are pretty nasty.

What do you think?

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