MIPS is constantly looking for ways to improve their Multi-directional Impact Protection System – but not just for bicycles. Full face helmets like those used for motocross or often for downhill MTB racing can also benefit from added safety, though they benefit from slightly different technology.

MIPS-F2

The new MIPS-F2 system is proof, and quite a departure from the flagship MIPS-C2 system that we’ve come to know in bicycle helmets. Rather than sitting inside the foam and between the padding, the F2 system sits between the outer shell of the helmet and the foam liner on the interior. Using a system of elastomers and nylon brackets that are molded into the foam liner, the foam liner is allowed to move separately from the Low Friction Layer which is part of the outer shell. The design sounds a bit like the 6D ODS system, but instead of two foam layers that are separated by elastomers, the MIP-F2 system only has one which should result in a slimmer profile. Like the current MIPS designs, the F2 system claims at least a 10% reduction in rotational impact forces.

MIPS F2 and E3 tech add new layers of safety to full face helmets

MIPS-E3

In addition to the MIPS-F2, the company is also introducing the MIPS-E3 which looks similar to the E2 system previewed at Eurobike. Rather than an elastomer system built into the shell or underneath, the MIPS-E3 Glidewear is a liner that consists of dual fabric layers with a low friction surface between the two. The liner sits between the foam shell and the comfort padding of the helmet to provide a low friction layer between the two.

Expect to see the two new technologies on full face helmets launching later this year.

mipsprotection.com

4 COMMENTS

    • Unless they are suing over inappropriate usage of confidentially shared IP, then I am surprised this would go through, as the SPIN system seems pretty similar to what Kali and Leatt have been doing with their little Armorgel inserts for several years. In other words, if MIPS has a patent on a gel based slip plane, then all 3 companies would likely be infringing, not just POC, and if MIPS doesn’t, then it would be Kali or Leatt who would likely have IP on that technology.

      From an outsiders perspective, this seems more like MIPS is cranky about being dumped and is just trying to spoil POC’s fun. On a slightly related note, the new MIPS F2 design seems somewhat akin to the original MIPS implementation on the POC full face helmets, where there were 2 shells outside the foam. That always seemed like a superior design to me, as it maintains a more consistent relationship between the riders head and the EPS.

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