The Italian suspension experts at EXT Extreme Racing Shox have expanded their mountain bike product lineup with a new range of shock oils and multi-purpose lubricants. Developed over in the past few years across disciplines from motorsports on down, the new line of synthetic suspension oils, lubes & grease have now been adapted for the bike.

EXT mountain bike specific shock oils & pivot lubes

Working with their pro cyclists, their mechanics, and bike shops, EXT refined a new cycling specific line-up of synthetic oils for forks & shocks, a high viscosity multi-purpose lube, a bearing grease, and a sealing gel.

The 2.5W synthetic shock fluid was first developed for World Rally Championship racing, but now the high viscosity oil can boost performance in your mountain bike. Available for 18€ for 500ml or 36€ for 1l, the shock oil promises long life, and resistance to foaming.

For forks synthetic 5W & &.5W oils with unique additives are available, again promising high anti-foam and anti-wear properties. They are both available from EXT by the liter for 30€. All of the suspension oils are completely compatibility with rubber shock seals.

EXT’s new Synth lube is unsurprisingly 100% synthetic, and designed as a lube for high load, low speed metal parts in contact, protecting against both rust & wear. Get it for 12€ in a 100ml bottle, or 50€ for 500ml.

The 25€ 200g tub of For High Temperature (FHT) Special Grease was developed to coat sliding parts, increasing o-ring & slider life. But it also doubles as a long lasting bearing grease.

Add to that a 25€ 200g tub of EXT’s Red Adhesive Gel, a unique sealing grease designed to lubricate things while keeping components in place. Soluble in oil, the gel is meant to be used in greased applications, for example to keep bearing seals and o-rings in place.

Check out more on the oils & lubes at EXT for their application or to order.

ExtremeShox.com

2 COMMENTS

  1. 2.5wt is not high viscosity.
    What’s the high temp grease for, riding in the desert? How hot do stanchions get? I’m not seeing a bunch of liquefying greases on bikes.
    Considering old spec Fox oil will damage new spec Fox seals, I don’t know how many people are going to go for mystery-brand behind door number three.

  2. Serious question: Can we quit using wt and start using objective measurements of fluid viscosity like SI units or Stokes/Centistokes?

    The variance between oil weights is really all over the place, and few oils seem to list Cst or sqm/s.

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