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Park’s Tool Kits Get another modern makeover just in time for Valentine’s Day

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Park Tool Kits

When considering a bike purchase it is necessary to consider the things that you need with it. Helmet, gloves, spare tube… oh, and tools! Park Tool has painted most shop service areas blue with their expansive line of tools. They have also made it easier & more cost effective for professionals and consumers alike to purchase their tools by offering them in several smartly packaged tool kits.

If your wife or hubby would get a huge kick out of one of these new kits for V-Day, Mother’s or Father’s day, they should be here just in time…

Park Tool WTK-2_001
photos c. of Park Tool

Though many piece their tool collection together as they need it, Park Tool offers tool kits prepackaged for all levels of need – from their simple $21.49 WTK-2 Essential Took Kit (above) to their $7995.95 MK-257 Master Tool Kit (title pic), and everything in between.

The WTK-2 consists of:

  •  TL-1.2 Tire Levers (2)
  • AWS-9 Fold-up Hex Wrench Set
  • TB-2 Tire Boots (2)
  • GP-2 Pre-Glued Super Patch Kit

Park Tool SK-2_001

A good starter kit for anyone that wants to start a tool collection or just needs something they can keep in the car without breaking the bank, Park Tool’s $110.95 SK-2 Home Mechanic Starter Kit is a handy item at a good price.

The SK-2 includes:

  • CT-5 Mini ChainBrute Chain Tool
  • DCW-1 Double Ended Cone Wrench: 13/14mm
  • DCW-2 Double Ended Cone Wrench: 15/16mm
  • DCW-3 Double Ended Cone Wrench: 17/18mm
  • FR-5 Cassette Lockring Remover
  • GP-2 Super Patch Kit
  • GSC-1 GearClean Brush
  • HCW-16 Chain Whip / 15mm Pedal Wrench
  • HXS-1.2 L-Shaped Hex Wrench Set
  • SD-2 Shop Screwdriver: #2 Phillips
  • SW-7.2 Triple Spoke Wrench
  • TL-1.2 Tire Lever Set
  • 1622 Torx® Compatible “L” Wrench

Park Tool AK-2_001

Taking it up a notch, the AK-2 Advanced Mechanic Tool Kit includes over 40 “shop level” tools that would fill the needs of any work bench or would be a great choice for the more hard-core mechanic’s long haul mobile tool kit. The $338.95 tool kit is a bargain once you add up how much these tools would cost individually and comes with a heavy duty tool box.

Park Tool EK-2_001Park Tool BX-2 BXB-2_002

Pictured above is what you will see on many fold out tables buried behind the row of team bikes awaiting maintenance all over the world. The EK-2 Professional Travel and Event Kit houses over 45 professional grade tools in their workbench of a tool box. The BX-2 Blue Box (also available separately) offers plenty of room to spare so you can customize your travel kit needs. At $734.95 it’s pricey, but if you really want mobile tool kit to a whole new level, they even have the BXB-2 backpack harness available.

Park Tool PK-2_001

Getting slightly more “big workbench” worthy, the $806.95 PK-2 Professional Tool Kit includes over 65 of their professional tools making it more “complete” than the slightly less expensive EK-2 in exchange for a simpler tool box.

Park Tool MK-257_001-2

Just stare at it and know you’ll have spent almost double on this kit buying everything individually over the next decade or two. It might be time to have a talk with your spouse (or financial consultant), regarding the long-term investment one should consider for this “bike life event”.  The $7,999.95 MK-257 Master Tool Kit is basically a shop in a box. Many shops will purchase this or the $4,909.95 BMK-243 Base master Tool Kit for their shop… or each mechanic. The “base” kit basically excludes the VERY expensive frame facing and cutting tools as even the grumpiest of mechanics will share those (touch any other one of their tools and you’re likely to lose a finger).

Eric Hawkins, Park Tool’s president/owner and chief mechanic:

“Kits are a fantastic way to purchase tools,” “Not only do our toolkits give you a wide variety of shop quality tools t o help do a wide variety of repairs, they’re also offered at a price that’s much better than buying the tools individually. We have the most comprehensive line of tools in the industry and our new line up of kits is a testament to the diversity and breadth only we can offer.”

ParkTool.com

 

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25 Comments
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jbt
jbt
6 years ago

Do people actually use the chain cleaner tool? I’ve always found them cumbersome wasteful of solvent and messy to clean up after. I typically use one thin stream of solvent applied to the chain then just run it through a sponge thats been in hot dawn soap infused water. just curious

AlanM
AlanM
6 years ago
Reply to  jbt

I never use a chain cleaner and rarely use a solvent or degreaser. I clean my chain by applying a good amount of lube, wipe it down, and then go through the normal lube process. This prevents taking all the good lube out of the chain with a solvent and if you keep up with it, things never get that dirty to begin with.

Chris
Chris
6 years ago
Reply to  jbt

Yes – I use it, twice in a typical wash. Hardly anything comes off the second time, but it’s just routine now.
What can I say? It gets the chain clean, nice and easily.

Bill
Bill
6 years ago

jbt – in the summer I do similar outside, but with Chicago winter, the somewhat self-contained chain cleaner is actually less mess indoors (Apartment life). A piece of cardboard under the stand catches the drips, and it works. I’ll typically do multiple bikes with one when I do it though.

Raule
Raule
6 years ago

Am I the only professional that thinks their tools are complete junk? I spend as much time fixing their tools as i do repairing bikes…

boom
boom
6 years ago
Reply to  Raule

nope – you aren’t the only one at all. Which is why I couldn’t be more excited about Unior coming to the US soon

crybabychris
crybabychris
6 years ago
Reply to  boom

Their tools are grossly over priced with inferior quality.

Kernel Flickitov
Kernel Flickitov
6 years ago
Reply to  crybabychris

Replaced most of my Park tools with Unior and they are clearly a higher quality. That’s two decades of tools I just turned over for something way better. Have no idea what you’re talking about.

Kernel Flickitov
Kernel Flickitov
6 years ago
Reply to  boom

Unior has been available from ProVelo for several years now.

Dan
Dan
6 years ago

What other tool brands to you recommend (in the states) to purchase? I’ve collected quite a few Park tools simply because they are quite easy to locate and purchase.

Thanks for the info…

Allan
Allan
6 years ago

I get it that the master took kit is basically for shops and big time wrenching use, but man I just cannot get my head around spending EIGHT GRAND for tools!!!

MtbRdr
MtbRdr
6 years ago
Reply to  Allan

Try getting into auto or diesel mechanics. 8k would get you a Snap-on box, maybe some ratchets and combination wrenches.

shafty
shafty
6 years ago

If you need basic hand tools(pliers, screwdrivers, wrenches, etc.), I’d skip Park. Think Wiha, Knipex, Proto. Pedros hex wrenches seem to hold up better. Park’s bike specific stuff isn’t bad, just intentionally affordable. The spacers on Park’s dishing tool are somewhat of a unique feature.

Their shop chain tool is nice, as the pin hasn’t changed in years. Park tire pliers are priceless sometimes. For how quickly dirty wheels wear out spoke wrenches, I like theirs.

Shanghaied
Shanghaied
6 years ago
Reply to  shafty

Yep, you cannot go wrong with any of the more well known German tool makers when it comes to standard hand tools. Besides Wiha and Knipex, I can also add Wera and PB Swiss, although the later is also pretty expensive. They may be a little more expensive than Park but the build quality, design and ergonomics are simply in another league altogether. Also, at least here in Europe what the LBS charge for Park tools is pretty comparable to what I pay for the other brands at some of the better hardware stores.

That said Park still make somes pretty great stuff – my TS 2.2 is most likely going in my will. Their chain tools, headset remover and cone wrenches are stellar too. All of their frame preping tools and presses are great too, but super expensive here in Europe, so I have mostly stuck to Cyclus when it comes to those, which have been quality stuff for not much money, but I suspect you can only find them in Europe.

Richard
Richard
6 years ago

I use a chain cleaner. Makes the whole process so quick.

Smitty
Smitty
6 years ago

I don’t think they’re junk, just a little costly for quality/what you get. I don’t mind making my own tools or using poorer quality as long as they aren’t expensive and won’t destroy anything. Who is the Harbor Freight of bike tools?

Slow Joe Crow
Slow Joe Crow
6 years ago
Reply to  Smitty

Lifu is the main purveyor of “good enough” tools. They sell retail in the US as Ice Toolz and also are the oem for Spin Doctor, Nashbar and i think Wrench Force.

Jack
Jack
6 years ago
Reply to  Slow Joe Crow

When the Wrench Force stuff first hit the market, most of it was made by Snap-On or one of its affiliates. It was certainly much higher quality than the Lifu stuff, and the cost was also more. Some of the stuff was great, much wasn’t a significant improvement over other stuff that was out there at the time.

Greg
Greg
6 years ago

All you “mechanics” breaking tools need to rethink your methods and capabilities.

Bubbrubb
Bubbrubb
6 years ago
Reply to  Greg

I was a mechanic for 10 years and tools break all the time. Sometimes user error, sometimes not. Only when you’ve spent time using tools all day every day should you really comment on quality. I’ve spent enough time using their tools to know that if it was my $ being invested I’d spent it elsewhere. We had plenty of great park tools, but so many bad ones that you can’t look to the brand as any hallmark or brand built on quality. Just cheap, easy to find, and that’s about it.

Matthew
Matthew
6 years ago

+1 for Greg: If you’re breaking entire toolsets (as opposed to one or two individual tools), it’s not the tools. My trusted LBS workstation wall is covered in Park Tools, some of which are 20 years old or more. One of those mechanics is a former US National Team traveling mechanic. They’re not complaining about Park’s quality.

MtbRdr
MtbRdr
6 years ago
Reply to  Matthew

They’re not complaining about Park’s quality to you.

Big mike
Big mike
6 years ago

+2 for Greg. Been a professional bike mescaline for 13 years. I can count all of the Park Tools that I have broken on one hand. Take your time and use the tool properly. There are better products, but Park is a great bang for the buck.

Ryan
Ryan
6 years ago

I don’t think the tools are junk I just think people mistreat/improperly use the tools. I don’t like all of parks tools but most of the tools are great and I agree they are a bit expensive.

Michael
Michael
6 years ago

I’ve been a gainfully employed bicycle mechanic for 27 years and have always used Park Tools. They work just fine. They rarely break, and the ones I have seen break have usually been hamfisted and/or used for tasks other than their intended purpose. My wall of blue tools makes me happy. Thanks Park.

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