EffettoMariposaShelterKitReview2016-1

No matter the type of bike you ride, road, mountain, gravel or cyclocross, invariably, the frame is going to be pinged and dinged by rocks or debris thrown up by the front wheel. Or, the driveside chainstay, abused by a slapping chain and slammed by grime and chain lube. There are several products on the market to help alleviate these issues, but Effetto Mariposa go a little further, offering a robust adhesive that promises to keep your bike looking good. Click on through for our review…

EffettoMariposaShelterKitReview2016-2

Effetto Mariposa’s Shelter kit is available in three different varieties; pre-cut for MTB and Road, or two simple strips that you can cut yourself, measuring 54mm x 500mm. Regardless of the kit, all Shelter strips measure 1.2mm in thickness.

Road kit left, MTB kit right.
Road kit left, MTB kit right.

I took receipt of the MTB kit, despite the fact I’d be installing it onto a gravel bike, the Parlee Chebacco. To appropriately test the Shelter kit, I thought it a good idea to see if it would hold up for 200 miles of 2016 Dirty Kanza abuse.

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The Shelter kit comes in a simple package, with the adhesive material laid onto backing paper, sandwiched between the outer presentation cardboard that also contains the installation guide. I despise fancy packaging; nice to see the Shelter kit doesn’t waste in this area.

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The Parlee Chebacco features some of the nicest internalized cabling around. Where cables enter the front of the bike, there are little to no potential rub spots to worry about. Thus, adhesive for the downtube and chainstay was all I needed for this particular installation.

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Installation is a breeze but a little patience is required. Clean the contact areas and carefully install the adhesive. Going too fast will result in air bubbles being trapped. As I found out, the adhesive doesn’t like to be released once it has been installed. As you can see from the two photos above, my initial attempt at installation looks a bit messy. However, the final appearance was markedly improved after I peeled back a little and carefully reapplied.

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Installed correctly, the adhesive cannot be seen from a distance, allowing the color of your frame to show through – and protecting it at the same time. Speaking of protection, Effetto Mariposa claim there are 50 layers of impact protection in every strip of Shelter.

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My only complaint about the Shelter kit is I wish the piece of adhesive for the downtube was longer. Granted, if installed beginning at the bottom bracket, the adhesive will protect most of the known impact spots of the downtube. But, I’d prefer to see fuller coverage – gravel roads have a nasty habit of throwing stuff all over the place, and they don’t discriminate when it comes to fancy paintjobs.

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This quibble aside, the Parlee Chebacco made it through Dirty Kanza 200 relatively unscathed. The paint was well protected from rock strikes and such by the Shelter kit, although mud during the early going miles of the 2016 edition was another matter. Incidentally, I finished the race too 🙂

Overall, the Shelter kit a nice product I recommend to anyone who cares about protecting their frame, while keeping it looking sharp. With it’s much thicker than usual adhesive, I would expect the Effetto Mariposa Shellter kit to perform admirably on one’s mountain bike – or road bike – or cyclocross bike. It certainly does well on gravel!

As a suggestion, I’d like to see Effetto Mariposa make an adhesive that installs onto the underside of the fork. This is an area on most bikes that see a lot of scratching and gouging… or, I could procure a second Shelter kit and customize.

Available for about $US 30 – $US 35, the Shelter is cheap insurance for your frame.

Effeto Mariposa

Photos and article by Gravel Cyclist. Jayson O’Mahoney is the Gravel Cyclist: A website about the Gravel Cycling Experience.

14 COMMENTS

    • Heffe, yes, that is the 54cm version of the Chebacco. I’ve raced the Chebacco at multiple gravel events including a bunch of training miles. Bike is very comfy with the 31.6 seatpost. Tyler is reviewing the biggest Chebacco size for BikeRumor.com, while I am reviewing the 54cm version on my website – GravelCyclist.com – I am working on a video review.

      Thanks!

  1. fyi, you can buy ~30ft of 2in wide helicopter tape on amazon for the same price – protect ALL of your bikes and your friends

  2. There’s one aspect of Shelter that you failed to mention, and it’s the impact dispersal qualities of the tape. I use it on the bottom of the downtube to protect against rock strikes, and it’s definitely reduced the severity of damage. I saw this video years ago on another review and thought it was a good demonstration.

  3. you can buy it in bulk, my local shop carries it in a huge roll and will sell if by the foot for pretty cheap. then you cut out what you need. better than it kit. costs less, more versatile.

    • @Ted, I haven’t tried with the Shelter kit, but it should work the same as the bulk 3M tape I use. Start with a spray bottle of diluted dish soap and spray the surface you want to apply the sticker to. Then place the sticker – the soap will allow you to adjust it to where you want it without it sticking. Then fill a spray bottle with diluted rubbing alcohol. Peel back the sticker half way and spray the whole area with the alcohol mixture. At that point you can use a squeegee or paper towel to work the liquid mixture to the edges which eliminates air bubbles. The alcohol removes the soap and allows the sticker to adhere. Repeat with the other half and you’re done.

  4. You should check my product out.

    Way more protection, includes slip solution, squeegee, a sweet sticker, and lots of extra circles and squares.

    Made in USA. Free Shipping.

    Frameshieldz.com

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