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Yes, you’ve probably seen the memes circulating by now – winter is coming. For some of us that means breaking out all the equipment we have to use just to stay alive in the coldest months. One issue that has always plagued riders in extremely cold temperatures? Freezing water. Ride at temperatures below zero and it won’t take long for that water bottle to become a block of ice.

Bar Mitts thinks they have the solution with their new Winter Bot. Basically a Bar Mitt for your bottle, the neoprene sleeve should keep your water liquid, and there may be a summer version in the works as well…

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Really, the idea is quite simple. The Winter Bot is a fleece lined, insulated pouch that is designed to bolt onto your frame with a standard water bottle cage. The cage bolts go through the holes on the Winter Bot which holds it in place. Then you have a water bottle that will fit standard size bottles (this one was a 22oz Purist bottle which would probably be the largest that would fit.

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If you’re the type to keep your water in an insulated hydration pack, the Winter Bot is apparently also very good for storing your light batteries. Keeping them from freezing will prolong their life giving your more time to enjoy the crisp darkness or just get home. Supposedly the concept works well with keeping bottles cool in the summer so Bar Mitts says a Summer Bot is on the way. The Winter Bot sells for $29.95 and includes a bottle cage, bolts, and a wrench.

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Bar Mitts was also showing a new Extreme Cold Road Mitt set which uses a thicker wall and includes a fleece lined compartment with an additional zipper. The Mitts also have a removable velcro cuff too keep out cold air and snow. Available for shifters with both internal and external cable routing, the Extreme Roads will sell for $125.

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If your little one also has a fat bike, you can now set them up with Bar Mitts of their own. The new Kids’ Mitts are just like the full size versions, but smaller and designed for flat bars with a $54.99 price tag.

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If you’ve ever parked your vehicle and wished you had a table handy, Bar Mitt’s new sister company Tail Gater may have the answer. Their new Tail Gater Tire Table is a simple addition to almost any tire that creates a functional table in just seconds. In the photos above, you’ll have to ignore the triangular support stands which are just to hold the wheel up on the show floor.

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The actual table simply slips over the top of almost any tire and adjusts to fit different widths. The standard version has two vertical support arms which push against the tire while the second version includes a diagonal support arm for even more strength. The table will supposedly hold up to 50 lbs, and measures roughly 27-28″ long, 24″ wide, and 1.5″ thick. Weighing in under 11 pounds, the tables will be available soon with an estimated retail of $129.95.

barmitts.com

tailgatertiretable.com

9 comments

  1. Von Kruiser on

    Not sure I want to have dinner stuck next to a tire anyway. Just looked online for camping tables. Found plenty between 50~100usd in small and large versions. Seems more like a novelty to have a table attached to a tire. “Hey that cow poop smell on your tire is excellent paired with the cheese and wine.”

    As for the insulated items for riding in winter… I’m always impressed with the tough people who ride in below freezing and snow conditions. Super dedicated riders having fun no matter the weather condition.

    Reply
  2. LARRY on

    Many Winter bikers are Fat Bikers and a great deal of us use fitted frame bags and other assorted. The Winter Bot is very difficult and time consuming to install and uninstall. I have tried one and tossed it. I prefer to throw a hand warmer packet in the bottom of a Revelate Feed Bag and have my water handy like it should be while riding.

    Reply
  3. Mike on

    Table needs to go vertical to 48″. Then it’s a tool tray and …….a place for your post ride brews. Can’t believe they thought people actually sit.

    Reply
  4. Mike Williams on

    Thermodynamics 101: the neoprene is preventing (in reality slowing down) the transfer of heat from the bottle via convection. So unless your water is warm/hot it is pretty useless. You can achieve the same results using a standard insulated water bottle and hot water. Also water isn’t going to freeze until below -5C and even then it is the valve that will go first so just shake the bottle periodically (e.g. when you drink) or place it upside down in the cage. If you want a real solution, look at the Stanley One Hand Mug its a proper vacuum mug that fits a bike cage (and won’t leak even if you drop it). I use 2 of these (one with tea and the other with hot chocolate) on my multi-hour Ottawa winter rides anywhere from 0C to below -20C and the liquids stays hot.

    Reply

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