When it comes to wide range cassettes, e*thirteen is hard to beat. Their 11 speed 9-46t design offers an incredible 511% range, and it’s compatible with existing 11 speed drivetrains – no special derailleur needed.

And now, it’s even more affordable thanks to the new TRS+ option which drops the price down to just $249. Weighing in at 339g, the two piece cassette still uses SRAM XD freehub bodies with the first piece locking in with an included lockring, and the second piece twisting into place with a chain whip. We’ve used this cassette design on mountain bikes, fat bikes, and even gravel bikes, and they’ve also been completely hassle free. As one of the lightest cassettes in its class, the TRS+ should be an easy upgrade for many this fall.

e*thirteen 9-46t cassette gets more affordable, plus new cranks, chainrings, Race SL group, and E-e*13? e*thirteen 9-46t cassette gets more affordable, plus new cranks, chainrings, Race SL group, and E-e*13?

Along with the new cassette, e*thirteen had a lot going on this tradeshow season with a completely reworked aluminum crankset line with the LG1+ and TRS+. Cranks are now built with the non-drive arm and spindle as one piece, while a captured self extracting bolt on the driveside crankarm pulls it all together or takes it apart. The cranks still use their APS adjustment system, and offer direct mount chainrings. The cranks above are also showing their new SL Chainring which is said to be 12g less and offer better chain retention for 10/11/12 speed chains.

e*thirteen 9-46t cassette gets more affordable, plus new cranks, chainrings, Race SL group, and E-e*13? e*thirteen 9-46t cassette gets more affordable, plus new cranks, chainrings, Race SL group, and E-e*13? e*thirteen 9-46t cassette gets more affordable, plus new cranks, chainrings, Race SL group, and E-e*13?e*thirteen 9-46t cassette gets more affordable, plus new cranks, chainrings, Race SL group, and E-e*13?e*thirteen 9-46t cassette gets more affordable, plus new cranks, chainrings, Race SL group, and E-e*13?Part of the new TRS Race SL line, you’ll find a new Race SL crank, wheelset, and chain guide. The cranks come in a 474g with the SL chainring for $400, while the chainguide weighs just 37g with the upper. The wheels are available in 27.5 or 29″ with a 28mm inner width and rim weights claimed at 388/422g. In spite of the paltry weight, they also test twice as well as the previous enduro model which should make them very competitive. Complete weights are claimed at 1690/1733g, and both sell for $1400 a set completely taped with valves and ready to go.

e*thirteen 9-46t cassette gets more affordable, plus new cranks, chainrings, Race SL group, and E-e*13?

Adding to their dropper post range, the TRS+ post is now available in a 170mm travel length as well. In addition to the extra travel, e*thirteen has updated the internals while shortening the post significantly with the 170mm post measuring 490mm end to end. Price is $279 with the lever. e*thirteen 9-46t cassette gets more affordable, plus new cranks, chainrings, Race SL group, and E-e*13?

Even their tires have gotten an update as they’ve gone to 72 tpi from 60, while also adding a thicker apex insert and stiffer enduro casing for a more durable, yet better riding tire.

e*thirteen 9-46t cassette gets more affordable, plus new cranks, chainrings, Race SL group, and E-e*13? e*thirteen 9-46t cassette gets more affordable, plus new cranks, chainrings, Race SL group, and E-e*13? e*thirteen 9-46t cassette gets more affordable, plus new cranks, chainrings, Race SL group, and E-e*13?

Finally, yes, that is a Shimano e8000 STEPS motor and those are e*thirteen e-bike components. At this point, it seems like it’s impossible for companies to resist – especially in the European market. So e*thirteen will be offering all levels of cranks in e-bike options as well as an e-bike STEPs or ISCG05 guide with a steel back plate for $35.

bythehive.com

 

15 comments

  1. ronshev on

    What does this mean exactly regarding the wheels? -> ” In spite of the paltry weight, they also test twice as well as the previous enduro model which should make them very competitive.” Test twice as well how? what test?

    And I guess this means, the tires went up from 60 tpi to 72 ? -> “as they’ve gone from 72 tpi from 60”

    Reply
  2. Jason Miles on

    How does the e8000 crank work? The Shimano crank has pinchbolts that secure the crankarm to the non tapered spindle splines. Seems like the e*13 crank will fall off as soon as the bolt loosens.

    Reply
  3. Jim on

    Stupider than stupid. The chain guys are telling us that small rings are inefficient. WTF are you going to ride up that you would need 46t rear. A 50×11 is bigger than 90% of the public needs. A 34×32 is just about a walking pace. What we need are some nice light weight 12 or 13 to 32 cassettes.

    Reply
    • Fred on

      Big cassettes are needed to ride up steep or long climbs especially at altitude! Did a 1000m climb up to 3000m the other day with a 26/40 tooth lowest gear and was still wishing for a lower gear at times.

      Reply
      • Jim on

        Sorry life got busy, I was going to follow this article. A 34×32 at 80rpm is 6.63mph. I guess the one thing I would say is are we talking on road or off road. On road a 34x 32 is pretty small. The other thing is 1x is stupid for anything other than cross racing. If you spin in the 95-105rpm range, which you should, a 1x sucks. The jumps are two way to big.

        Reply
  4. Shedrick on

    Jim, what works for you isn’t what works for others. When living in Colorado I had buddies and even occasionally myself single speeded the peaks up to 13,500 ft. These days I live in Tennessee and only ride up to around 6,000 ft. I still want the widest range possible without a front derailleur. It helps for those days when I want to do a 40 mile ride with 7,000 ft of climbing.

    Reply
    • Jim on

      What’s with that 1x fascination? It only works if you A: don’t spin, which you should or B: have a very narrow speed range, ie cross race. 7000ft straight up and straight down, sure a 1x will work. But now lets throw in 20miles of rolling light head on that ride. The jumps on a 1x will never let you be in the cadence that you should be in.

      Reply
  5. Shafty on

    That top picture could easily pass for a 90s mtb drivetrain. I’m trying to figure out why I’d give up Shimano shift quality and economy of scale, for 9t and 10t sprockets. The gear range % looks good on paper, and maybe that’s enough for some people. While I think SRAMs Eagle groups are a waste of money, at least they added gearing in the correct direction. People need help riding up hills, not down them.

    “With E:13, your chain won’t fall off, but your cranks will”

    Reply
    • socially conscious and concerned on

      The advantage of a higher range in the rear isn’t that you can get a bigger gear to go faster, but that you can go to a smaller ring up front to increase your low gearing if need be.

      Reply
  6. captain derp on

    some clarification on the 170mm dropper: i’ve emailed e13 inquiring about it, expected availability is Jan/Feb 2018. Will be 4 position height like the shorter travel versions (but no comment on what the positions would be set at). They didn’t comment on price, but i’d be surprised if it wasn’t the same price as the current models. I read elsewhere that they made some tweaks that result in the overall length being 20mm less than the 150mm model despite having 20mm more travel.

    Reply

COMMENT HERE: (For best results, log in through Wordpress or your social media account. Anonymous/fake email comments may be unapproved or deleted. ALL first-time commenter's posts are held for moderation. Check our Comment Policy for full details.)

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.