After years of working with other bike brands around the world, the team behind Vielo has finally launched their first bike. A father and son team of Ian and Trevor Hughes, Vielo claims to focus on creating bikes specifically for the British market. Whether that means building in comfort for unmaintained roads, or designing the frame to adapt to British standards like moto-style brakes (front brake lever on the right), Vielo aims to build bikes that fit into their own style of riding.

Vielo launches with V+1 all road bike tuned for riding on & off British roads

The result is their first complete bike – the V+1. On the surface, the V+1 seems to follow a lot of the same design trends as newer gravel bikes like the OPEN U.P., and other light weight “all road” bikes, but there are a few things that make it unique.

Vielo launches with V+1 all road bike tuned for riding on & off British roads

Something most of us probably take for granted if you’re not running moto-style brakes is that most frames are designed with routing to accommodate the front brake from the left and the rear brake from the right. If you reverse the brakes as most riders in the UK do, then you’re left with less than ideal cable routing. To address that, the V+1’s internal routing is specifically tailored to UK standards.

Vielo launches with V+1 all road bike tuned for riding on & off British roads

The often wet weather of the UK is known to wreak havoc on bearings, so the PF86 bottom bracket uses special double row sealed cartridge bearings for a more durable BB and 30mm spindles. Similarly, the headset features double sealed bearings with additional protection on the lower bearing for longevity.

Vielo launches with V+1 all road bike tuned for riding on & off British roadsThat wet weather also can mean the use of fenders so the V+1 has somewhat hidden fender mounts on the inside of the fork legs and the rear stays. However, it does sound like if you want to run fenders you’ll need to use their custom SKS mudguard system designed for the bike.

Disc brake only, the frame runs post mount 140mm while the fork is post mount 160mm, and the fork can handle up to 180mm rotors if more stopping power is required. Like most gravel or all road bikes, the V+1 runs a 100 x 12mm thru axle up front and a 142 x 12mm thru axle out back, both with Vielo’s A2T fast thread engagement.

Vielo launches with V+1 all road bike tuned for riding on & off British roads

The unidirectional carbon frame is said to weigh just 870g with “size scaled performance and geometry” paired with a 400g full carbon fork with a 1 1/2 to 1 1/8″ tapered steerer. To tackle the rough roads and off roads of Britain, the bike claims to have a “passive rear suspension” or shaped chain and seat stays to absorb some of the road chatter.

Vielo launches with V+1 all road bike tuned for riding on & off British roads

The V+1 has quite a bit of tire clearance, though it’s certainly no monster crosser. With 700c wheels you’ll be able to run up to 42mm tires, but you can also supposedly run 650b x 2.1″. Obviously, that will likely depend on the tire and rim combination though.

Vielo launches with V+1 all road bike tuned for riding on & off British roads

Built with a hidden seat post clamp with the bolt under the top tube, the V+1 also has the ability to run dropper posts – including the RockShox Reverb. There is apparently a special mechanical to hydraulic adapter that can be hidden inside the frame that allows a standard left shifter to operate the Reverb hydraulic post which is an optional upgrade at extra cost. There’s even a dropper post compatible clamp for a Tubus rack mount if you want to carry extra gear.

Vielo launches with V+1 all road bike tuned for riding on & off British roads

You’ll also find braze ons up top for strapless gas tank style bags for longer days int he saddle.

Vielo launches with V+1 all road bike tuned for riding on & off British roads

Speced with a 1×11 drivetrain and wide range SRAM Force 1 gearing, the V+1 only comes in two colors, but has a number of options. Pricing starts at £2,999 for the frameset, and £5,299 for the complete bike (add another £200 for a complete with a dropper post). This is apparently just the first of a complete line of Vielo bikes, but from the looks of it, they’re off to a great start.

vielo.cc

21 COMMENTS

  1. I’m wondering why Vielo have built around a high bottom bracket here? 52.5mm drop is right up there with the highest CX bikes, and will make for a very high ride height with 700c x 40mm tires. WIth 650b x 42mm it would be ok, but still a lot higher than rando bikes. For comparison, the OPEN U.P. runs 70mm drop, which is a bit low for offroad with 650b x 42s, but great with 650b x 48s, which are the same outer diameter as 700c x 33s.

    • jeez I didn’t catch that detail. If that’s accurate, the BB is hella high. My bike has 65mm drop, and I’d like more.
      Seems like this bike is more about pretty pictures and paint than practical details.

    • It’s an interesting choice, as is the ambiguous marketing target (not gravel, but not road). The BB drop is less than most road racing bikes but the rest of the Geo is gravel-like. To me, the 1x only is the deal-breaker. I think lots of riders will want a 2x since this kind of bike is mostly about versatility.

  2. > The often wet weather of the UK is known to wreak havoc on bearings

    So let’s use a press fit system so people can’t change the bearings easily.

    And here I thought the dark photo fad was over…

  3. That all read great until I came to the geometry chart. Not only the bb drop is unusually small but also the stack numbers are really small for those ambitious reach values. Don’t correlate well with bike fit data. They should talk to s.o. who understands geometry.

    Let’s hope those frame moulds are not yet CNCed.

  4. Every BB86 to 30mm bottom bracket I know uses double row bearings. This is due to the small ball size the frame/spindle combination requires. If you’re gonna use a 30mm spindle, and you want a wide bb shell, just use the 386 dimensions.

  5. That means most Shimano brakes won’t fit… Especially the higher end groups.

    My frame is still post mount (obviously works fine!) but if I was looking at a new frame now I’d expect Flat Mount – regardless of whether you like Shimano pushing the standard or not.

    Although SRAM do post mount from top to bottom of their range (for how long though)

    • I read on the Open blog that only new Dura Ace doesn’t make a post mount variant, all the other groups do. Plus non-series post mount Shimano brakes are still available.

      • Shimano calipers are roughly all the same except for a few, so swapping out a flat mount for a post mount other or non-series isn’t really a problem.

        The real problem is running Shimano at all in the first place 😉

  6. Ultra high BB drop, press fit, and post mount disc triple fail. Deep pockets and German design can’t make up for no market research. Another startup bites the dust.

  7. Thank you for your comments. Just to clarify a couple of points;
    The cable routing will accommodate both UK and continental style set up. The cable frame plugs are switchable from each side to ensure clean cable runs without compromise.
    For Calliper mounts, post mount is a superior engineered system over direct mount for this style of bike. For sure, direct mount on road bikes. With post mount, we can offer a wider range of rotor sizes too.
    Interestingly, when we showcased the V+1 at Sea Otter this year, we did not get anybody comment that they disapproved of post mount callipers.
    Very happy to answer any questions here.

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