You have a lot of options these days when it comes to full face helmets. Whether racing down hill or just wanting to add some extra facial protection, there’s probably an option that will suit your needs. Over the past few years, convertible helmets have seen a resurgence in popularity, but they also have their trade offs.

Hands On: Leatt DBX 4.0 full face helmet goes light on weight, not protection

When Leatt set out to make the new DBX 4.0, they wanted something that was down hill certified, but still light and airy enough to use on a daily basis. That meant ditching the idea of making it convertible which adds weight and complexity. We’ve seen more helmets in this category recently which balance a high degree of protection with a much lighter and more ventilated design than full on DH race helmets.

Hands On: Leatt DBX 4.0 full face helmet goes light on weight, not protection Hands On: Leatt DBX 4.0 full face helmet goes light on weight, not protection Hands On: Leatt DBX 4.0 full face helmet goes light on weight, not protection Hands On: Leatt DBX 4.0 full face helmet goes light on weight, not protection

Along those lines, the DBX 4.0 has 22 vents placed throughout the helmet with a removable mouthpiece for even more air flow. While it’s certainly not as cool as a half shell helmet, there is a noticeable difference between this and an older DH lid. I say older, because a lot of the newer DH helmets I’ve tried, have impressive ventilation which makes the difference in ventilation between them and the DBX 4.0 smaller. But you’re also talking about some of the most expensive helmets on the market like the POC Coron Air Spin. For comparison, the DBX 4.0 is almost half the price at $229.99.

Hands On: Leatt DBX 4.0 full face helmet goes light on weight, not protection Hands On: Leatt DBX 4.0 full face helmet goes light on weight, not protection

As important as ventilation and a low weight, Leatt wanted to make sure the helmet offered a high degree of protection, inside and out. The helmet comes in two different shell sizes with a polymer compound shell with inmolded EPS & EPO impact foam for dual density protection.

On top of that, Leatt has added their 360° Turbine technology which claims to reduce rotational acceleration by 40% and reduce linear g-forces by 30%. The little rubber like turbines compress and rotate in any direction during an impact which gives them their protective edge.

Hands On: Leatt DBX 4.0 full face helmet goes light on weight, not protection

The inmold construction helps get the weight down, with my medium sample coming in at 903g. That’s less than my medium Giro Switchblade at 980g, but hardly enough to make the call just on weight alone.

Hands On: Leatt DBX 4.0 full face helmet goes light on weight, not protection

However, where the DBX 4.0 might win out over something like the Switchblade is in the comfort department. The Dri-Lex liner and padding makes for a comfortable fit, and the absence of a retention system like the Switchblade makes the DBX much easier to take on and off.

A Fidlock magnetic buckle also helps with quick removal of the helmet, though it feels like the strap could be a bit more substantial. Maybe the addition of some padding would make it feel more secure? Compared to all my other DH helmets, the strap on the DBX just seems a little anemic for the intended purpose.

Hands On: Leatt DBX 4.0 full face helmet goes light on weight, not protection

The visor is not adjustable, but it does offer a break away feature in the event of a crash. Otherwise, it’s nicely tucked into the lines of the helmet. Goggle storage under the visor is a bit tight though, so you’ll probably end up flipping them around or putting them around your neck between runs.

As for goggle fit however, the helmet is great. I tend to have issues with helmets pushing the goggles down into my nose making it hard to breath, but not here.

Hands On: Leatt DBX 4.0 full face helmet goes light on weight, not protection

Overall, the DBX 4.0 seems like a great addition to the Leatt helmet line. It doesn’t hurt that in my opinion, this is the best looking full face that Leatt currently offers. But it also packs a solid amount of features in a light weight helmet that would be a great option for enduro racers, park rats, or really anyone looking for the protection of a full face helmet with a lighter, more ventilated package.

Available in S-XL, and in four colors, the helmet is AS/NZS 2063:2008, ASTM F1952–10, EN1078, and CPSC 1203 certified and sells for $229.99.

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