By now you have probably seen that Specialized has an all new Enduro. In an effort to make it the fastest Enduro ever, all of the bikes have moved to 29″ wheels and see increased travel from 160 to 170mm front and rear. To get all of the glorious tech details, check out the first post here. If you’ve already read through that one and you’re looking for models and pricing, you’ve come to the right place.

2020 Specialized Enduro 29 Model breakdown with pricing

S-Works Enduro

As usual, if you’re looking for the most exclusive, highest performing mode, look no further than S-Works. While all of the new Enduro frames feature carbon fiber front triangles and swing arms, the S-Works gets even more carbon with a full set of carbon suspension links. That removes about 250g from the frame weight – though the stiffness is the same as those with aluminum links.

2020 Specialized Enduro 29 Model breakdown with pricing

2020 Specialized Enduro 29 Model breakdown with pricing

Offered in Gloss Dove Gray or Satin Black tint, the S-works models top out just under 10 grand at $9,750. That gets you a Shimano XTR drivetrain (with Race Face Next R carbon crank) which is made possible by the fact that the Roval Traverse SL carbon wheels use a 54t DT Swiss Star Ratchet system – which means Micro Spline compatibility. A 170mm travel 44mm offset Fox Factory Float 36 & Float DHX2 shock with EVOL air sleeve and 2 position adjustment both feature Kashima to keep things buttery smooth. An MRP chain guide will keep the chain right where it’s supposed to be. XTR 4 piston brakes make sure the bike comes to a stop with 200/180mm rotors.While the drivetrain utilizes cables, the dropper does not – a 30.9 RockShox Reverb AXS cuts the cord. Other S-Works only features include a 35mm Roval Traverse SL Carbon riser bar that’s 800mm wide and a Deity Copperhead 35mm stem.

2020 Specialized Enduro 29 Model breakdown with pricing

All of the Enduro models have moved to an ‘S’ sizing system with S2-S5 replacing the standard size names. This is because the frame sizing is now more flexible thanks to shorter seat tubes and the ability to choose your frame based on personal preference.

2020 Specialized Enduro 29 Model breakdown with pricing

The S-Works Enduro in an S4 is the only complete we were able to weigh, but it came in at 31.68lbs (14.37kg) without pedals, and the frame weighed 7.91lbs (3.59kg) with all the hardware including a bottom bracket (no headset).

2020 Specialized Enduro 29 Model breakdown with pricing

Enduro Expert

Dropping down to the Expert from the S-Works model results in a pretty massive price drop of more than $3k, with the Expert priced at $6,550. You lose the full carbon suspension linkage, but the aluminum links on this model are just as stiff. This model still uses a 170mm travel 44mm offset Fox 36 fork, but at the Performance level. The rear shock moves to a Float DPX2 Performance with the EVOL Air Sleeve and 3 position adjustment.

2020 Specialized Enduro 29 Model breakdown with pricing

2020 Specialized Enduro 29 Model breakdown with pricing

Both the Gloss Red Tint and Satin Cool Gray colors come equipped with SRAM X01 shifters and derailleurs but with GX Eagle cassette and chain. A SRAM Descendant Boost crank finishes the drivetrain. The Expert still runs carbon wheels but with the Roval Traverse carbon which feature the same 30mm inner width as the S-Work’s SLs. The Experts are slowed down with SRAM Code RSC 4 piston brakes with 200mm rotors, and dropper post duties are handled by the X-Fusion Manic.

2020 Specialized Enduro 29 Model breakdown with pricing

Enduro Elite

The Enduro Elite drops the price down to $5,310 and changes to Rock Shox suspension, a lower GX/NX Eagle drivetrain, and aluminum Roval Traverse wheels.

2020 Specialized Enduro 29 Model breakdown with pricing

2020 Specialized Enduro 29 Model breakdown with pricing

This model is offered in Gloss White Mountains, or the strangely appealing Satin Dusty Lilac. It’s certainly an interesting color, but one that looks really good in person. Though if you’re looking for stealth, the Gloss White Mountains colorway has the least obvious branding of all of the frames.

2020 Specialized Enduro 29 Model breakdown with pricing

2020 Specialized Enduro 29 Model breakdown with pricing

2020 Specialized Enduro 29 Model breakdown with pricing

Enduro Comp

Finally, even at the Comp level you’re still getting a full carbon frame with aluminum suspension links. This build again uses Rock Shox suspension but moves to a full SRAM NX Eagle drivetrain with an 11-50 cassette. Otherwise it’s pretty similar and still a solid build for $4,510.

2020 Specialized Enduro 29 Model breakdown with pricing

Enduro S-Works Carbon Frame

If you’d rather build it yourself, the S-Works model is also available as a frame with a Fox Float Facory DHX2 rear shock.

2020 Specialized Enduro 29 Model breakdown with pricing 2020 Specialized Enduro 29 Model breakdown with pricing

Offered in three colors, the frame includes the rear axle, chainguide, seat clamp, and bottle cage for the SWAT door at $3,310.

specialized.com

22 COMMENTS

  1. Somebody’s gonna have to explain to me why a $5,300 bike has a mix of GX/NX Eagle drivetrain parts. Bike prices have gotten nuts. What the hell are the OEM prices on the 12 speed drivetrain components from SRAM now? I have XX1 kit on my full suspension ride (XTR on my hardtail), but 12 speed kit seems like it’s twice as expensive at every level. How did SRAM get this kind of pricing power?

    • Everyone seems to care far too much about drivetrains these days. They are among the least important parts on a build.

      Parts you should definitely care about more:
      Frame
      Fork
      Shock
      Wheels
      Brakes

    • No need to get all worked up. This is easy to explain. I can do it in two words; Tariffs & Inflation. Not terribly difficult to understand when you stop and think about it.

      • That’s why I’ve given up on mountain bikes (& road bikes as well). The prices make me sick to my stomach. A few years ago I could’ve purchased a high end build for $5-$6K.

        Nowadays ‘low end’ bikes are at that price range. Tariffs or inflation be damned, I’m done. I’ve moved on to motocrossers. Heck I just purchased a nice new ’19 Yamaha YZ250F for thousands less than an what Specialized is demanding for the new S-Works Enduro.

        I’ve relegated myself to just browsing bikes online and comment how nice they are and saying, “if only”…

        Cheers and happy trails!

        • Today’s “low-end” $5k bike walks all over a $10k bike from 10 years ago, in every way except possibly weight. Bikes aren’t getting more expensive, they’re better bikes at every pricepoint than they have ever been before. If you compare what you get for $3k now to 2010 – in terms of actual performance, rather than the names stamped on the parts – you get a much, much better bike now.
          The only thing that has changed is that the higher-end bikes are higher-end than has been available in the past. Awesome performance if you’re rich – easily ignored if you’re not.

          Also, if a brand prioritizing the quality of the frame and wheels over the groupset when speccing, we should all be applauding that. The group is one of the least important parts of a bike for performance.

          • You’re not wrong, but my TV is both much better and cheaper/no more expensive. Housing is arguably somewhat worse, and much more expensive. There are different ways this could go in the industry. I don’t believe that the technological changes justify the price increases. SRAM eTAP, maybe? Mechanical Eagle? Cmon… I think probably consumer demand drives this somewhat (someone’s buying these bikes), I just don’t really understand the demand side.

          • “better bikes at every pricepoint than they have ever been before. If you compare what you get for $3k now to 2010 – in terms of actual performance, rather than the names stamped on the parts – you get a much, much better bike now.”

            This may only be true for full suspension mountain bikes. It’s not true for road, CX, gravel (i.e. fat tired CX bikes that somehow everyone got convinced were different), or hardtail MTBs. There’s been progress around carbon frame mfg techniques, that’s about it.

            Also, and I know you’re just making a point, but there basically weren’t any $10k road bikes 10 years. Not from the big boys anyway.

          • The problem is today’s $5k bike might walk over a $10k bike from 2009, but I’ve got $5k bike from 2012 and… bikes have moved on very little since then. It’s got 26in wheels and it’s a little small for me, but it’s got tubeless tyres, a 1x drive train, a dropper, quality suspension front and back. It rips, every 18 months or so I take my aged bike with to a demo day and ride it back to back to back against whatever new bike has got my attention. It’s seen off everything so far, including the 2017 Enduro 29er, which was a better climber but gained nothing on the downs.

            • Keep smoking man if you can’t feel the difference. Just the fork alone is world’s apart from what you are on. Enjoy the parking lot. Come on, better linkages, leverage ratios and shifting. To name only a few. The last Enduro was not a great pedaling bike or (climber). Every year there has been improvements on bikes. Yes, it’s expensive but dang it’s fun. Keep it legal.

    • I can’t ever remember Specialized being competitive on price, but this one’s got a threaded BB and suspiciously normal looking shock mounts, so thye’re learning. When the Alu version comes along it will no doubt be a bit more sensible.

  2. Did they ditch “Brain”? It looks like a step in the right direction for Specialized, but I don’t think I’d ever buy one, ” boutique” pricing on a mass produced brand, no thanks. The only thing I do like about Specialized is the “SWAT” compartment, I wish more bikes came with their version of it…..I did see a Trek gravel bike with something similar, so I don’t believe it is a patented thing.

    • That is because Shimano is blowing it in the mountain bike OEM world. SRAM is dominating with great products at all price points. Maybe they will get it together but for the meantime Shimano is barely relevant.

      • It’s not because SRAM parts are better or are better value, it’s because Shimano are being difficult with their new freehub standard and manufacturers want to avoid speccing off-brand cassettes.

        • It is much more than just the freehub standard that keeps Shimano off SRAM in OEM sales. One, SRAM can sell nearly all the parts needed on the bike. Shimano can’t do that anymore. Just a half-assed drivetrain and arguably very good brakes. Two, and more importantly to sales, SRAM has been 12 speed for how long now? Shimano just got there.

  3. the 2019 Levo S-Works has the Code RSC brakes, but on this bike they are at the Expert level and the S-Works get the XTR group, what does this mean ? is the XTR group better as a whole now ? then why isn’t it on the other S-Works bikes ? or does shimano force manufacturers to use their brakes and drivetrain together ?

  4. Kinda weird that the complete S-Works model comes with an MRP chainguide but the S-Works frame comes with the regular Specialized plastic guide.

  5. This bike is an aproach to the Nomad V4 wich is a carbon bike and allways been expensive but with high status and confident carbon type techology.Spec dont want to left behind .
    For me the only opcion 29 is an error an arrogant error from Spec.
    The high price charged in lot of bikes its in most cases greed .And putting very expensive transmission on the bikes like the Eagle and xx1 and so on .
    Some justify with the bikes today are better equipped than 10 years ago Really ?Today ALL the stuff are produced more and more in PRC.Mass production low prices policy

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