DMR’s new Versa is a hybrid platform pedal for mountain bikers on the fence between the pedaling efficiency of clipless and the freedom of platforms. But while many combination clipless & flat pedals come packed with compromises and extra weight, both sides of the  Versa signal high performance, and at a weight lighter than many platform-only pedals.

DMR Versa hybrid clipless & platform mountain bike pedals

DMR Versa MTB pedals, hybrid two-sided clipless flat platform mountain bike pedals

The combination hybrid one-side clipless & one-side platform pedal is nothing new, but it has most often been applied to entry-level bikes for either touring or beginner mountain biking. A common description could probably be ‘Jack of all trades, master of none’. But at the same time on the performance gravity or enduro side of mountain biking, there’s solid arguments for the benefits of both clipless and flat pedals. So after years of making well-received pedals in both separate style, British component makers DMR decided to mash them up.

DMR Versa MTB pedals, hybrid two-sided clipless flat platform mountain bike pedals

The result is the new Versa, a premium low-profile CNC-machined 6061 alloy hybrid clipless & platform pedal that promises the best of both worlds: Grind Up, Bomb Down.

Tech details

DMR Versa MTB pedals, hybrid two-sided clipless flat platform mountain bike pedals

The DMR Versa pedal shares the overall design of their popular Vault pedal on the flat side with a large 97mm x 104mm platform with ten replaceable traction pins.

DMR Versa MTB pedals, hybrid two-sided clipless flat platform mountain bike pedals

The clipless side shares the same platform shape with the option for four more replaceable traction pins at its corners. (The pedals come without pins installed on the clipless side, but extra pins included.) A one-sided SPD compatible retention mechanism with adjustable tension locks in a standard Shimano-style cleat (5° float cleats come with the pedals.) The clipless mechanism is relatively low-profile with tons of open space around it to clear mud.

DMR Versa MTB pedals, hybrid two-sided clipless flat platform mountain bike pedals

The Versa is quite low profile for any platform pedal with a standard sloping leading edge, let alone one with clipless capabilities. At their front edge, the pedal is just 14mm thick, and only 19mm thick around the reinforced axle. The 5mm long traction pins then give the perception of a concave pedal body for excellent grip with soft & sticky shoes.

The Versa pedals spin on 4140 chromoly steel axles with a combination of sealed bushings & cartridge bearings, that DMR says are user serviceable.

Actual weight, pricing & availability

DMR Versa MTB pedals, hybrid two-sided clipless flat platform mountain bike pedals 474g actual weight

DMR claims a weight of 470g for a pair of Versas, and ours weighed just a touch more at 474g. The £115 pedals are available direct from DMR and come in five anodized colors: black, this bright blue, red, orange & silver.

First Impressions

DMR Versa MTB pedals, hybrid two-sided clipless flat platform mountain bike pedals

The Versa pedals feel well made, and much more precise than any other combination pedals I’ve tried before. The open, low-profile body really does give the impression of a premium flat pedal. The light weight & low stack height of the clipless mechanism seems to do a good job of keeping the pedal from feeling bulky or always ending up with the wrong side up. But at the same time with grippy pin on the platform side and none on the clipless side, it really is easy to always be sure that the pedal is right where you want it under your foot.

DMR Versa MTB pedals, hybrid two-sided clipless flat platform mountain bike pedals

I am generally in the camp of always riding clipped in, with the Crankbrothers Mallet DH my preferred gravity pedal. But the clipless mechanism of the Versa is just as easy to get into, and the much larger platform side without a clipless mechanism in the way offers surprising grip, that I could probably get used to.

DMRbikes.com

10 COMMENTS

  1. This pedal looks very similar to the Funn Mamba, but the Mamba is a little lighter. The Shimano pd-t8000 is lighter still and is concave on the non-clipless side. Even with the long pins on the Versa, I suspect that the SPD cleat will sometimes hit the pedal when using the flat side.

  2. the concept is one of those things that sounds good until you think it through. Unless you’re bringing a change of shoes for the downhill, riding on the unclipped side is going to suck; because you need different shoes for clips and flat – flats require more sole flex than works with clips. There isn’t such a thing as a shoe that works for either, and I don’t see how there could be.

  3. Probably the weight weenie’s choice among the SPD+Flat pedal option range out there, and that benefit comes with a pretty hefty price tag. Shimano’s Deore XT PD-T8000 pedals have just four traction pins on the flat pedal side, sure, but they’re more than half the cost.

    Still, these are pretty nice. The platform side is much more substantial and more akin to the old Saint PD-MX80 flat pedal set.

  4. Like “i” just said, this doesn’t seem like it could work. Obviously the “first impressions” didn’t include riding impressions. If you try to use a flat pedal with a shoe with a cleat, you’ll be standing on the cleat in the middle, and that would be horrible. This only works to give you the option of which type to use on a ride, but unless you bring two pairs of shoes, you are not switching for the up and down.

  5. I once had some hybrid flat + clips pedals from Time on my commuter. It is nice to be able to ride the same bike with flats or clipless without changing wheels but…somehow you never end up on the pedal side you are wishing for.

    Ultimately riding a trail oriented Time Atac MX pedal (Atac with a larger platform than their XC line) was more convenient.

  6. Hi All,

    Tom from DMR here. We designed the Versa to have a cut out channel on the flat side so that the cleat doesn’t interfere with the pedal. That said, it does require a certain kind of shoe – such as the Five Ten Kestral or Giro Chamber that have a flat pedal style sole, and a recessed cleat. The size of the platform and length of the pins should ensure there is good grip, even with slightly stiffer soles.

    This pedal is for two kinds of riders – those that sometimes wear their flat shoes and sometimes their SPD shoes, and those that want to do both in one ride.

  7. Does one side of the pedal tend to rotate down more than the other? So if im riding flats and take my footnoff, would the clip side rotate up or vice versa?

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