Had your eyes on the Ripmo, but just can’t get over the carbon price tag? Well, you’re in luck – you can now get Ripmo AF. That’s Aluminum Frame, if you’re wondering. Yes, Ibis has taken their exciting new Ripmo and given it an aluminum make over that’s even slacker to shred everything.

Ibis goes Ripmo AF with more affordable, aluminum framed big wheel shredder

Ibis goes Ripmo AF with more affordable, aluminum framed big wheel shredder
Photo c. Ian Collins/Ibis
Ibis goes Ripmo AF with more affordable, aluminum framed big wheel shredder
Photo c. Ian Collins/Ibis

Obviously, one of the biggest changes to the Ripmo AF is the use of aluminum for the frame. However, Ibis did an impressive job of replicating the swoopy lines of the carbon version in metal. That includes the ability to run longer dropper posts with M-XL frames capable of running 170mm posts, and the small running 125-150mm depending on the rider’s needs.

Ibis goes Ripmo AF with more affordable, aluminum framed big wheel shredder

Ibis goes Ripmo AF with more affordable, aluminum framed big wheel shredder

Riders who crash a lot and tend to push the limits may gravitate towards an aluminum frame for both durability and cost of replacement. That’s likely part of why the Ripmo AF gets even slacker with a 64.9° head tube angle – a full degree slacker than the carbon version. This also results in a longer wheelbase, but otherwise the geometry is mostly identical with a 76-77° seat tube angle and 435mm chainstays. Just like the carbon version, a 44mm offset 160mm travel fork is used to provide more stable handling handling.

Ibis goes Ripmo AF with more affordable, aluminum framed big wheel shredder

Ibis goes Ripmo AF with more affordable, aluminum framed big wheel shredder
Photo c. Ian Collins/Ibis
Ibis goes Ripmo AF with more affordable, aluminum framed big wheel shredder
Photo c. Ian Collins/Ibis
Ibis goes Ripmo AF with more affordable, aluminum framed big wheel shredder
Photo c. Ian Collins/Ibis

Those stays are wide enough to run 29 x 2.6″ tires on 35mm internal rims giving you plenty of tire clearance to get rowdy. Speaking of rowdy, the Ripmo AF also includes a more progressive leverage ratio to allow the frame to work with both air and coil shocks to make the most of the 145mm of dw-link travel. Complete bikes will all include a DVO Topaz Air shock in a 210 x 55mm Metric size, but a DVO Jade X coil shock is available as a $100 option on all builds.

Ibis goes Ripmo AF with more affordable, aluminum framed big wheel shredder
Photo c. Ian Collins/Ibis

Like the original, a combination of both bushing and bearings are used. At the lower link of the suspension, IGUS bushings are used. For the upper link though, bearings are used. Ibis says this is the ideal combination of “bushings where you need them, bearings where you don’t.”

Ibis goes Ripmo AF with more affordable, aluminum framed big wheel shredder

Ibis goes Ripmo AF with more affordable, aluminum framed big wheel shredder
Photo c. Ian Collins/Ibis

Ibis goes Ripmo AF with more affordable, aluminum framed big wheel shredder Ibis goes Ripmo AF with more affordable, aluminum framed big wheel shredder Ibis goes Ripmo AF with more affordable, aluminum framed big wheel shredder

Elsewhere, the frame includes a smart list of features and specs including a 73mm threaded BSA bottom bracket, ISCT 05 compatibility with a removable adapter, 148 x 12mm Boost spacing, port style internal cable routing, a ZS44/ZS56 tapered headset, and a bottle cage mount positioned to allow for a full 26oz bottle (small frames will have to do with a 22oz bottle). Complete frame weight is said to be 8.25lbs for a medium with a DVO Topaz shock.

Ibis goes Ripmo AF with more affordable, aluminum framed big wheel shredder

Offered as a frame only for $1,799 ($1,899 with a coil shock), complete builds start at just $2,999 with a solid mix of components. All Ripmo AF frames include a seven year frame warranty plus a lifetime replacement on the suspension bushings, and are shipping worldwide starting today.

ibiscycles.com

 

 

 

10 COMMENTS

  1. Pretty cool to see a less expensive version of a rad frame, but I have a question, and I certainly don’t ask it to inflame the seemingly inevitable internet firestorm, but in the article it says that “a 44mm offset 160mm travel fork is used to reign in the slack head angle and provide quicker handling”, which if we’re talking about the other option being a 51mm offset, seems incorrect, unless the rules of trail and all that change when you get super slack (and maybe they do).

    So in the interest of everyone–most of all me–learning something I wanted to ask for more explanation of that statement. My understanding of handling and rake/trail figures is basically that slacker headtube = more trail = “slower” handling (more self stabilizing) and more rake = less trail; so if you want a quicker handling bike, you put more rake on the fork to reduce the trail number. Of course there’s more to it than that, but that takes care of the important parts.

    So my question is how does LESS rake = quicker handling? Someone please help me learn more about this!

    Thanks a bunch!

    • You’re right, just an error on my part during late night writing. Shorter offset increases trail measurement which has a similar effect to slackening the head tube angle.

    • Looks like Zach already explained that it was a simple late night error, but, just for your further information, I have seen several references recently where people seem to be claiming that less rake somehow speeds up handling due to shortening the “front center” and therefore “wheelbase” measurements, so you may come across those arguments in your bike interweb-surfing.

      I personally think that you are 100% correct and less rake will slow handling, as a small difference in trail can profoundly change handling, whereas front center and wheelbase changes are far more subtle. If you simply look at the % figures, a 5mm change in rake could be about a 10% change in trail. whereas it would be less than a somewhere in the ballpark of a 0.5% change in wheelbase, so the stability gains far outweigh the losses.

      The main difference between less rake vs. slacker head angle is that, while they both increase trail, and thus both improve steering stability, the slacker head angle will also further lengthen front center and wheelbase, so the effect is magnified somewhat, along with making the bike more “endo/OTB” resistant. In other words, they aren’t totally a totally 1 to 1 ratio in regard to overall handling.

      • Thanks to you both! Yeah ok, well that all makes sense. And yes, it really has seemed like there’s been a lot of talk about using shorter rakes to speed up handling lately, which does just seem odd. Just to add to the confusion, I wonder how the huge amounts of wheel flop that you get with a high-trail, super slack bike come into the picture. Maybe at some point the wheel flop could actually start to counteract the stabilizing effects trail??? That’ll either take more experimentation or a smarter mind that mine! Anyway, I appreciate the extra background on the topic!

  2. As one that loathes the use of “AF”, I am laughing at the use of it for “aluminum frame”.

    Nice bike. Seems like there has been a turning point in mtb pricing with some nice models in Al coming in sub $3k. Recession???
    I can’t be the only one that thinks $5k+ bikes are not sustainable.

  3. I totally love what potential various alloy versions of certain brand’s bikes might offer for pricepoint, value, accessibility, for great riding models! Heavier, of course…but just get harder, man;-)! Bring them!

  4. How come is the SLX build 1000$ more expensive than the NX one? The full M7100 group is like half the price gap.
    Also why the GX one has deore breaks and not XT or SLX?

    • Agree Speed565. That pricing structure is stupid. Alas, I’ve seen other brands do the same. Inquired about switching out brakes for Shimano from a certain Utah builder. they wanted more than the retail price of the Shimano brakes, and no credit for the SRAM brakes they weren’t using. In essence pay us for the SRAM brake, the Shimano brakes, and to install everything as retail. Just stupid! Needless to say I did not bite. The attitude put them out of consideration in fact.

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