Ever since their massively successful Kickstarter campaign, Tailfin has been putting the final touches on their AeroPack system. As Tailfin founder and engineer Nick Broadbent puts it, “With the AeroPack, our aim was to take the idea of a traditional seat pack and make it better. We looked at what was out there and smoothed out the inherent and reported issues: swaying on the bike, access to your gear, mounting, abrasion issues and more, to create a solid, stable and light accessory.”

Tailfin Aeropack combines integrated seatpack & aero rack supports for all-in-one gear solution

That has all led to the production version of the rack/bag that is now available for purchase. Compared to other ways to carry your gear on self-supported adventures, the AeroPack has a few unique advantages. For starters, since the AeroPack is mounted to the bike with its integrated rack system, the bag won’t sway like standard seat packs. The mount is compatible with standard rack mounts or quick release or thru axle frames and can even be used with full suspension mountain bikes.

Tailfin Aeropack combines integrated seatpack & aero rack supports for all-in-one gear solution

Also, since it attaches low on the seat post, dropper posts still have some functionality –  though how much looks to depend on the length of your dropper and how far back the AeroPack sits in relation to the saddle.

Another claimed advantage of the system is its aerodynamics. During testing, Tailfin found their AeroPack to be equal to or better than any other saddle bag in terms of aerodynamics. They also found a major difference in aerodynamics when running a seat pack only vs. running handlebar bags as well. Apparently, most handlebar bags will result in a 10-20W aero penalty thanks to the additional drag up front.

Tailfin Aeropack combines integrated seatpack & aero rack supports for all-in-one gear solution Tailfin Aeropack combines integrated seatpack & aero rack supports for all-in-one gear solution

Offered in two versions, the AeroPack S is meant to be used only as a seat pack with a 20L capacity and weight limit of 9kg. Claimed weight for the full system is 690g – 860g depending on the material and the mounting type.

Tailfin Aeropack combines integrated seatpack & aero rack supports for all-in-one gear solution Tailfin Aeropack combines integrated seatpack & aero rack supports for all-in-one gear solution

The AeroPack X uses the same seat pack, but adds the ability to mount their pannier bags to the sides for additional storage. Claimed weight for the X is 750g – 960g depending on the material and mounting type

Both versions are available with aluminum or carbon rack supports, for a total of four separate options. The same rack improvements are also available in the new X & S series racks, which are not integrated into the bag like the AeroPack. These racks are designed for use with their AeroPack Trunk Top Bag which is a bit heavier than the integrated AeroPack models, but allows you to quickly disconnect the bag from the rack.

Pricing starts at $220 for the AeroPack S alloy, and goes up from there depending on the setup and included bags. Changes from the prototype include a more modular design that will allow you to replace fewer parts if you ever manage to break the rack in a crash. Each is available now.

tailfin.cc

11 COMMENTS

  1. Serial retrogrouch, uber-curmudgeon, and handlebar bag advocate Jan Heine claims that handlebar bags are better and an aerodynamic fairing and to slow down his otherwise twitchy geometry preferences. I’ll let the two of them fight it out.

    Personally, I think it looks nice for long day trips. Sometimes you just want to pack a change of regular clothes and hang somewhere.

  2. I do like the idea of this, but it’s misleading to compare this rack/bag to a bikepacking seatbag and handlebar roll combo. This has a 20-l capacity. A seatbag and handlebar roll together might have a capacity of 30 l. I’m also dubious about using it with rear suspension.

  3. IMO, if you’re adding 2+ liter carrying capacity to your bike aerodynamics is rarely an issue. I really like lowering the load though that thing still sits pretty high above the rear tire. Still much better than the large bags that hook to saddle rails and sway a lot, especially for very tall riders.

  4. Considering the weight difference between the ability to add panniers vs no-panniers is just 100g, I’ll go for the panniers option, 100g makes no difference since your luggage will add a lot more weight to the bike.

    Though if you want to have the ability to remove the seat pack, that’ll add even more weight but it’s the most flexible option, though in my view, I’ll likely use the seat pack most of the time and only on extended bike trips where the necessity of panniers come into view.

  5. mine arrived as part of the second batch delivery. i’s quite nicely made, but there is one porblem, if your saddle height (to bb) is less than 70cm, then the saddle will get in the way of the first part of the bag i.e. decrease the volume even further. i think any one shorter will struggle to make a good fit on their bike.

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