The track bike discipline is a bit different than the other cycling events at the Tokyo Olympics 2021. These aren’t the skinny-jeans-&-Chrome-bag-style track bikes you’ll see in front of Whole Foods. These are carbon fiber aero machines with fast, high torque maniacs racing around a wooden track with no brakes.

Tokyo Olympics 2021 Felt ERD race machine
Photo credit: feltbicycles.com

Sound exciting? It is, and there are many different disciplines that you can watch during Tokyo Olympics 2021. Actually — Track dominates the cycling program at an Olympics with 12 out of 22 events.

The history of Olympic track cycling dates back over 120 years, with its first appearance coming at the Athens 1896 Games. It has been part of the Olympic sports program ever since, (except for Stockholm 1912). However, women’s track cycling didn’t make its Olympic debut in Seoul in 1988.

Olympic Track cycling equipment

The UCI and regulating bodies strictly enforce what riders can and can’t use on the track. Loads of engineering and aerodynamic testing go into every new bike. Felt even went as far as moving the crankset from the right to the left side of the bike itself on the TA FRD bike first made for the Rio Olympics. Because these races are decided on fractions of a second, and aero is everything.

Tokyo Olympics 2021 Felt ERD Non drive drive
Photo credit: feltbicycles.com

When we say no brakes, we mean no brakes — the bikes the track racers use are single-speed and fixed gear. Meaning the bike has no freewheel like bikes on the road or mountain — no coasting allowed. Riders choose their gearing based on the event’s discipline and fitness. Mind you — these riders have to spin up the massive gear at the start and then keep it rolling with fantastic cadence to keep control.

Felt TK FRD track bike

This year, Felt Introduced a new Track focused tool in the form of the TK FRD. Different from the TA FRD, the TK is meant for mass-start and sprint disciplines where aerobars are shunned in favor of more traditional drop bars.

What is the velodrome?

The nice thing about the track is that they are the same wooden constructed banked tracks every time, though each has its own feel and speed. They’re also usually indoors, or at least covered since the wooden surface does not mix well with the elements.

Izu Velodrome Tokyo Olympics 2021
Photo: Ralph Schurmann

The track is 250m in length and banked to 45 degrees at the highest. The Izu Velodrome is where the action will take place for the Tokyo Olympics is located in Izu City, Shizuoka Prefecture – right in the Sports Center, about 120km away from Tokyo proper.

Different disciplines of Olympic Track Cycling

There are six different disciplines this year at the Tokyo Olympics — this means there are 12 gold medals for the taking — but only if you have what it takes.

Tokyo Olympics 2021 Felt traveling bike package
Photo credit: feltbicycles.com

Felt’s Ultimate Guide to Track Cycling events in Tokyo

Felt Bicycles has positioned itself as the U.S. expert in track racing, and they put together a fantastic guide to track cycling disciplines which they’ve allowed us to repost below. Hit up their blog for more posts that dive into the world of track racing. Check out the bike Team USA will be riding here.

Team Sprint

As its name implies, the Team Sprint is a variation on the Sprint event that showcases teams of three riders going head-to-head against one another. Each team begins from a standing start on opposite sides of the track, and they race for a distance of three laps. Once the race starts, a team’s three riders will quickly get into a paceline formation. The front rider will peel off after the first lap. Then the remaining two riders will continue sprinting. At the end of the second lap, the lead rider will pull off, leaving the last remaining rider to complete the final lap. Whichever team’s final rider crosses the finish line first is the winner. At the highest levels of the Team Sprint competition, typical finishing times for a race are around 45 seconds, and riders will get up to speeds of about 40 mph / 64 kph. Regarding the women’s competition for the Team Sprint, the format utilizes teams of two riders sprinting over two laps instead of three riders over three laps for the men.

Sprint

The Sprint may very well be the purest form of bike racing. Two riders compete in a series of head-to-head races over three laps of the velodrome (also referred to as a “match”). The two riders start next to each other from a standing start. The first rider to cross the finish line wins the race, and the rider who wins the best of three races wins the match. Riders who qualify for this event are placed into a knockout format, with the winner of each round advancing to face a new opponent. As the name implies, the Sprint is a fast and furious test of a rider’s explosive power. But, tactics also come into play quite often. Spectators will often see one or both competitors ride slowly during the first lap or two in an attempt to conserve a bit of energy and force their opponent to make the first move, thereby “leading out” the sprint—which can often give an advantage to the other rider thanks to a slight aerodynamic draft. Because the Sprint demands explosive power and exceptional handling skills from the riders, bikes like the all-new FELT TK FRD are optimal.

Keirin

The Keirin event originated in Japan, where track cycling is incredibly popular. It’s a mass-start event that sees a group of six riders lines up next to each other along the start line. Men’s events are contested over eight total laps, while the women’s Keirin is contested over six complete laps. The race kicks off when an official riding a pace bike (often a motorized scooter or electric bicycle) rides past the start line. The competitors will then launch from a standing start and settle into a paceline formation behind the official pace bike. The riders must stay behind the pace bike, which will gradually increase its speed up to around 45-50 kph. When there are two and a half laps remaining in the race, the pace bike will peel off and out of the way, leaving the riders to sprint directly against one another towards the finish line. What makes the Keirin exciting is that sometimes there will be a full sprint between all the riders over those remaining two and a half laps, and sometimes there may be some tactics employed as riders may not wish to begin their sprints immediately, instead of trying to coax their rivals into leading them out.

Tokyo Olympics 2021 Track Felt Team pursuit
Photo Credit: Casey B. Gibson for Felt Bicycles

Team Pursuit

The Team Pursuit is the ultimate test of teamwork, focus, and grit. Two teams of four riders compete head-to-head over a distance of four kilometers (16 laps of a velodrome). Each team starts on opposite sides of the track, utilizing a standing start method—which means each rider will need to use all of their strength to quickly get up to speed. Each team will then quickly merge into a paceline formation, with the riders settling into a single-file line. The teams will then chase, or “pursue,” one another, with each team rotating riders off the front to spread out the workload and maximize the complete team’s effort (just like in a paceline on a road ride). If one team successfully catches up to the other team in a race for a medal, then they are victorious and the race is over. If this happens during a classification round when all teams must post their fastest time to qualify or be seeded into subsequent rounds, then the rules dictate that the “caught” team must ensure that they do not impede the faster team in the safest manner possible.

More commonly, one team will not catch another, and the winning team is the one that posted the fastest time. It’s also important to know that a team’s official time is counted when the third rider of the team crosses the finish line. Because of this rule, it’s common to see teams employ a tactic of having one rider take a longer pull on the front to expend all of their energy and then safely and slowly move out of the way, so that their teammates can more efficiently complete the remaining laps. Because of the high speeds and aerodynamic efficiency required to post the fastest time possible, team pursuit squads will utilize aerodynamically-optimized bikes with aerobars and aggressive riding positions—such as the TA FRD ridden by the members of the USA Cycling track program.

Tokyo Olympics 2021 Kerin track
Photo Credit: Casey B. Gibson for Felt Bicycles

Omnium

The Omnium is a competition for individual riders and consists of a medley of four unique mass-start races. Riders receive points based on their results in each race, and the rider with the most cumulative points after all four racers is the winner. In each race, the winner receives 40 points; second place receives 38, third place receives 36, and so on. The entire Omnium competition will take place over the course of a day. Here are the four events that will make up the Omnium in Tokyo:

  • Scratch Race
    Held over 15 km for the men and 10 km for the women, the Scratch race is a straightforward affair that sees points being awarded to the top finishers who cross the finish line first after the total race distance. The Scratch race begins with a neutral first lap to allow all of the riders to get up to speed.
  • Tempo Race: This race is held over 10 km (40 laps) for men and 7.5 km (30 laps) for women. After the first four laps of the race, officials begin awarding one point to the rider who crosses the finish line first at the end of each lap. Any rider who laps the field gains a massive 20 points, while riders can lose 20 points if they’re lapped by the main field. The rider with the most points wins the Tempo Race and is then awarded a different set of points based on the Omnium scoring system.
  • Elimination Race
    Another mass-start event that is relatively straightforward, the Elimination race sees all of the riders start together. After a neutral lap for everyone to get up to speed, the race is on. Every two laps, the last-placed rider is eliminated from the race. This continues until there is only one rider left, who is the winner.
  • Points Race: Held over 25 km for the men and 20 km for the women, the Points Race features a sprint for points every 10 laps. The top four riders in each sprint score point —5 points for the first-placed rider, 3 points for second, 2 points for third, and 1 point for fourth—and the last sprint to cap off the race scores double. This is similar to the Madison event in scoring. Lapping the field will earn a racer an additional 20 points.
Tokyo Olympics 2021 track Felt Madison
Photo Credit: Casey B. Gibson for Felt Bicycles

Madison

The Madison may very well be the most unique event in all of track cycling. Named for New York City’s Madison Square Garden arena where the event first gained popularity in the early days of track racing, the Madison is a complex team event that consists of two riders per team racing against several other teams at the same time, with each team attempting to score points at various points in the race. This summer’s competition in Tokyo will feature a women’s Madison event for the first time in the competition’s history. For the men’s event, the race is 50 kilometers long (200 laps of the velodrome), and the women’s is 30 kilometers (120 laps). Every 10 laps, teams will sprint to the finish line to accumulate points—5 points for the first team, 3 points for the second team, 2 points for the third team, and 1 point for the fourth team. Points awarded in the final sprint at the very end of the race are doubled. Teams can also earn a bonus 20 points if they lap the field and join the rear of the main pack of riders.

Only one member of each two-person team is active in the race at any given time. The other team member circles the track along the upper, or outer, section to rest between their sprints. When it comes time to swap places, team members must physically touch one another, which is most commonly done via a maneuver where the two riders will grasp hands and the active rider will “slingshot” the other rider forward to add a burst of acceleration. The team that completes the most laps is the winner, with the points standings deciding the winner if more than one team finishes the entire race without being lapped.

Olympic Track Cycling Tokyo 2021 – Who to watch

Considering the cancellation of track worlds this year, no one can say who will come out on top. We do know the teams that are always dialed for perfection though; Team USA is looking good, especially with Chloe Dygert leading the charge for the women. The G.B. squad and the Dutch men all have what it takes for a gold medal effort.

Men’s and Women’s Cycle Track

Australia

Ashlee Ankudinoff

  • Women’s Team Pursuit

Georgia Baker

  • Women’s Team Pursuit
  • Women’s Madison

Annette Edmondons

  • Women’s Omnium
  • Women’s Team Pursuit
  • Women’s Madison

Matthew Glaetzer

  • Men’s Team Sprint
  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Nathan Hart

  • Men’s Team Sprint
  • Men’s Sprint

Leigh Howard

  • Men’s Team Sprint
  • Men’s Madison

Alexandra Many

  • Women’s Team Pursuit

Kaarle McCulloch

  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Kelland O’Brien

  • Men’s Madison

Lucas Plapp

  • Men’s Team Pursuit

Alexander Porter

  • Men’s Team Pursuit

Matthew Richardson

  • Men’s Team Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Sam Welsford

  • Men’s Team Pursuit
  • Men’s Omnium

Austria

Andreas Graf

  • Men’s Madison

Andrease Mueller

  • Men’s Omnium
  • Men’s Madison

Belarus

Yauheni Karaliok

  • Men’s Omnium

Tatsiana Sharakova

  • Women’s Omnium

Belgium

Jolien D’Hoore

  • Women’s Madison

Kenny de Ketele

  • Men’s Omnium
  • Men’s Madison

Robbe Ghys

  • Men’s Madison

Lotte Kopecky

  • Women’s Omnium
  • Women’s Madison

Canada

Hugo Barrette

  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Allison Beveridge

  • Women’s Omnium

Ariane Bonhommme

  • Women’s Team Pursuit

Vincent de Haitre

  • Men’s Team Pursuit

Jasmin Duehring

  • Women’s Team Pursuit

Michael Foley

  • Men’s Team Pursuit
  • Men’s Madison

Annie Foreman-Mackey

  • Women’s Team Pursuit

Derek Gee

  • Men’s Team Pursuit
  • Men’s Madison

Lauriane Genest

  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Jay Lamoureux

  • Men’s Team Pursuit

Kelsey Mitchell

  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Georgia Simmerling

  • Women’s Team Pursuit

Nick Wammes

  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Peoples Republic of China

Shanju Bao

  • Women’s Team Sprint
  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Jiali Liu

  • Women’s Omnium

Xu Chao

  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Tianshi Zhong

  • No Info

Colombia

Kevin Santiago Quintero Chavarro

  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Czech Republic

Tomas Babek

  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Denmark

Amalie Dideriksen

  • Women’s Omnium
  • Women’s Madison

Norman Lasse Hansen

  • Men’s Team Pursuit
  • Men’s Madison

Julius Johansen

  • Men’s Team Pursuit

Niklas Larsen

  • Men’s Omnium
  • Men’s Madison

Julie Leth

  • Women’s Madison

Frederik Madsen

  • Men’s Team Pursuit

Rasmus Pedersen

  • Men’s Team Pursuit

Egypt

Ebtissam Ahmed Zayed

  • Women’s Omnium

France

Victoire Berteau

  • Women’s Team Pursuit

Marion Borras

  • Women’s Team Pursuit

Clara Copponi

  • Women’s Omnium
  • Women’s Madison

Coralie Demay

  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Fortin Valetine

  • Women’s Team Pursuit

Florian Grengbo

  • Men’s Team Sprint

Donavan Grondin

  • Men’s Madison

Mathilde Gros

  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Rayan Helal

  • Men’s Team Sprint
  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Marie le Net

  • Women’s Team Pursuit
  • Women’s Madison

Benjamin Thomas

  • Men’s Omnium
  • Men’s Madison

Sebastien Vigier

  • Men’s Team Sprint
  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Germany

Timo Bichler

  • Men’s Team Sprint

Stefan Motticher

  • Men’s Team Sprint
  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Franziska Brausse

  • Women’s Team Pursuit
  • Women’s Madison

Sophie Lea Friedrich

  • Women’s Team Sprint
  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Felix Gross

  • Men’s Team Pursuit

Emma Hinze

  • Women’s Team Sprint
  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Lisa Klein

  • Women’s Team Pursuit
  • Women’s Madison

Roger Kluge

  • Men’s Omnium
  • Men’s Madison

Mieke Kroger

  • Women’s Team Pursuit

Maximilian Levy

  • Men’s Team Sprint
  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Theo Reinhardt

  • Men’s Team Pursuit
  • Men’s Madison

Leon Rohde

  • Men’s Team Pursuit

Laura Suessemilch

  • Women’s Team Pursuit

Domenic Weinstein

  • Men’s Team Pursuit

Great Britian

Katie Archibald

  • Women’s Team Pursuit
  • Women’s Madison

Elinor Barker

  • Women’s Team Pursuit

Jack Carlin

  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin
  • Men’s Team Sprint

Edward Clancy

  • Men’s Team Pursuit

Neah Evans

  • Women’s Team Pursuit

Ethan Hater

  • Men’s Team Pursuit
  • Men’s Madison

Jason Kenny

  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin
  • Men’s Team Sprint

Laura Kenny

  • Women’s Omnium
  • Women’s Madison

Josie Knight

  • Women’s Team Pursuit

Katy Marchant

  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Ryan Owens

  • Men’s Team Sprint

Ethan Vernon

  • Men’s Team Pursuit

Matthew Walls

  • Men’s Omnium
  • Men’s Madison

Oliver Wood

  • Men’s Team Pursuit

Greece

Christos Volikakis

  • Men’s Omnium

Hong Kong, China

Jessica Yan Hoi Lee

  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Sze Wai Lee

  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Yee Bo Leung

  • Women’s Madison

Yao Pang

  • Women’s Omnium
  • Women’s Madison

Ireland

Mark Downey

  • Men’s Omnium
  • Men’s Madison

Felix English

  • Men’s Madison

Emily Kay

  • Women’s Omnium
  • Women’s Madison

Shannon McCurley

  • Women’s Madison

Italy

Martina Alzini

  • Women’s Team Pursuit

Elisa Balsamo

  • Women’s Team Pursuit
  • Women’s Madison

Rachele Barbieri

  • Women’s Team Pursuit

Simone Consonni

  • Men’s Team Pursuit
  • Men’s Madison

Filippo Ganna

  • Men’s Team Pursuit

Vittoria Guazzini

  • Women’s Team Pursuit

Francesco Lamon

  • Men’s Team Pursuit

Jonathan Milan

  • Men’s Team Pursuit

Letizia Paternoster

  • Women’s Omnium
  • Women’s Madison

Elia Viviani

  • Men’s Omnium
  • Men’s Madison

Japan

Eiya Hashimoto

  • Men’s Omnium

Yumi Kajihara

  • Women’s Omnium
  • Women’s Madison

Yuka Kobayashi

  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Kisato Nakamura

  • Women’s Madison

Yudai Nitta

  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Yuta Wakimoto

  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Kazakhstan

Sergey Ponomaryov

  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Artyom Zakharov

  • Men’s Omnium

Lithuania

Simona Krupeckaite

  • Women’s Team Sprint
  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Migle Marozaite

  • Women’s Team Sprint
  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Malaysia

Azizulhasni Mohd Awang

  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Firdus Shah Muhammad Sahrom

  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Mexico

Daniela Luz Gaxiola Gonzalez

  • Women’s Team Sprint
  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Jessica Valles Salazar

  • Women’s Omnium

Yuli Osuna Verdugo

  • Women’s Team Sprint
  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Netherlands

Shanne Braspennincx

  • Women’s Team Sprint
  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Matthijs Buchli

  • Men’s Keirin

Yoeri Havik

  • Men’s Madison

Jeffrey Hoogland

  • Men’s Team Sprint
  • Men’s Sprint

Harrie Lavreysen

  • Men’s Team Sprint
  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Amy Pieters

  • Women’s Madison

Roy van den Berg

  • Men’s Team Sprint

Laurine van Riessen

  • Women’s Team Sprint
  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Willem Jan van Ship

  • Men’s Omnium
  • Men’s Madison

Kirtsen Wild

  • Women’s Omnium
  • Women’s Madison

New Zealand

Ellesse Andrews

  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Bryony Botha

  • Women’s Team Pursuit

Rushlee Buchanan

  • Women’s Team Pursuit
  • Women’s Madison

Sam Dakin

  • Men’s Team Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Holly Edmondston

  • Women’s Omnium

Aaron Gate

  • Men’s Team Pursuit
  • Men’s Madison

Regan Gough

  • Men’s Team Pursuit

Jessie Hodges

  • Women’s Madison

Kirstie James

  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Team Pursuit

Jordan Kerby

  • Men’s Team Pursuit

Ethan Mitchell

  • Men’s Team Sprint
  • Men’s Sprint

Jaime Nielsen

  • Women’s Team Pursuit

Campbell Stewart

  • Men’s Omnium
  • Men’s Madison

Corbin Strong

  • Men’s Team Pursuit

Sam Webster

  • Men’s Team Sprint
  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Norway

Yvonne Anita Stenberg

  • Women’s Omnium

Poland

Marlena Karwacka

  • Women’s Team Sprint
  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Urszula los

  • Women’s Team Sprint
  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Krzysztof Maksel

  • Men’s Team Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Daria Pikulik

  • Women’s Omnium
  • Women’s Madison

Wiktoria Pikulik

  • Women’s Madison

Patryk Rajkowski

  • Men’s Team Sprint
  • Men’s Sprint

Mateusz Rudyk

  • Men’s Team Sprint
  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Szymon Sajnok

  • Men’s Omnium
  • Men’s Madison

Daniel Staniszewski

  • Men’s Madison

Portugal

Maria Martins

  • Women’s Omnium

Republic of Korea

Hyejin Lee

  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

ROC (Russia)

Denis Dmitriev

  • Men’s Team Sprint
  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Ivan Gladdyshev

  • Men’s Team Sprint

Gulnaz Khatuntseva

  • Women’s Madison

Mariia Novolodskaia

  • Women’s Omnium
  • Women’s Madison

Daria Shmeleva

  • Women’s Team Sprint
  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Anastasiia Voinova

  • Women’s Team Sprint
  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Pavel Yakushevskiy

  • Men’s Team Sprint
  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

South Africa

Charlene du Preez

  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

David Maree

  • Men’s Omnium

Jean Spies

  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Spain

Sebastian Mora Vedri

  • Men’s Madison

Albert Barcelo Torres

  • Men’s Omnium
  • Men’s Madison

Suriname

Jair Fa En Tjon

  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Switzerland

Stefan Bissegger

  • Men’s Team Pursuit

Robin Froidevaux

  • Men’s Team Pursuit
  • Men’s Madison

Thery Schir

  • Men’s Omnium
  • Men’s Madison

Mauro Schmid

  • Men’s Team Pursuit

Cyrille Thiery

  • Men’s Team Pursuit

Trinidad and Tobago

Kwesi Browne

  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Nicholas Paul

  • Men’s Sprint
  • Men’s Keirin

Ukraine

Liubov Basova

  • Women’s Team Sprint
  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Olena Starikova

  • Women’s Team Sprint
  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

United States of America

Chloe Dygert

  • Women’s Team Pursuit

Madalyn Godby

  • Women’s Sprint
  • Women’s Keirin

Adrian Hegyvary

  • Men’s Madison

Gavin Hoover

  • Men’s Omnium
  • Men’s Madison

Megan Jastrab

  • Women’s Madison

Jennifer Valente

  • Women’s Team Pursuit
  • Women’s Omnium
  • Women’s Madison

Emma White

  • Women’s Team Pursuit

Lily Williams

  • Women’s Team Pursuit

When to watch — Olympic Track Cycling at the Tokyo Olympics 2021

Aug. 2 to 8 — all track events including heats, Quarter-final, Semi-final, and Metal Round.

  • Aug 2 — 2:30 am – 5:30 am EST
  • Aug 3 — 2:30 am – 5:30 am EST
  • Aug 4 — 2:30 am – 6:00 am EST
  • Aug 5 — 2:30 am – 5:50 am EST
  • Aug 6 — 2:30 am – 6:15 am EST
  • Aug 7— 2:30 am – 5:25 am EST, 9:00 pm (medal round)
  • Aug 8 — 12:15 am EST

You can watch all the different track disciplines on NBC/Peacock.

For a complete listing of all Olympic Cycling events, check out our first post here.

Mountain biking more your speed? Check out the Olympic XC MTB race information here.

If road racing is more your style, check out our complete guide to Olympic Road Cycling for the 2021 Tokyo Olympic road race

5 COMMENTS

    • Are you sure? The danish team pursuit broke the WR 3 time at the last World Championships.

      And the Madison squad also won at the last World Championships…

  1. I’ve noticed more than a few pics of track bikes over the years that look like they have droopy chains, so I assume that must be on purpose. Why is that? I’d worry, especially with how much torque they put down, they could flex the BB enough to lose a chain.

    • Chains are kept loose as possible. Tight chains = more friction. Track racers tend to be extra detail orientated due to the fact that fractions of a second make a difference here.

      Usually the bikes are so stiff that there isn’t enough deflection to cause the chain to come off, and they usually test them to make sure it’s as loose as possible before they do.

  2. Thank you for the break down, I frequently catch track events on Eurosport and it’s almost as confusing to understand as an American as cricket.

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