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5th edition of Zinn & The Art of Road Bike Maintenance gets at old and new tech

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Zinn-road-parts
all images copyright Lenard Zinn

Lennard Zinn’s maintenance books have been the gold standard for home mechanics for many years, and we’ve seen a number of shop rats who got their start thumbing through the pages. All in all his guides are the most popular resource worldwide for bicycle repair and maintenance, from basic tire and tube changes to complicated drivetrain overhauls. Now a new version of the Road Bike book is out, bringing together all the classic road tech solutions with plenty of new standards as well, all with simple one color illustrations that make it easy to follow from the workshop…

Zinn-cover Zinn-back-cover

The best-selling DIY guide uses simple step-by-step instructions to help the mechanically inclined keep vintage parts running smoothly or set up the newest components and drivetrains. It outlines not only the process, but the tools needed to do each job right. This road version covers the wide range from time trial bikes to cyclocross machines, with every type of road bike in between.

Zinn-tools Zinn-positioning

The newest 5th edition adds in-depth coverage of recent tech advances like: thru-axles, SRAM’s new eTap wireless shifting system, second generation electronic groups from Shimano and Campagnolo, direct-mount brake setup and troubleshooting, 1×11 cyclocross drivetrains, recent updates in tubular gluing tape, and more. An entire new chapter on electronic shifting will get you through all your battery-power woes, while a new chapter on disc brakes will have you ready for a new season of UCI road racing.

The new 8.5″ x 11″ formatted book is available now in bookstores, bike shops, and directly online for $27. The 488 page tome with more than 700 illustrations will set you on your way to getting all of your bike running like a dream. You can even get a better deal on it already over at Amazon.

Amazon.com

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carrierejf
7 years ago

New sections include Q&A about grouppo parts hacking… 😉

larsqwe
larsqwe
7 years ago

….. Zach wrote about this December 21st. Why did you guys do another piece?

Whatthefoxsaid
Whatthefoxsaid
7 years ago

There is a secret chapter at the end of the book on how to edope. 🙂

Pit
Pit
7 years ago

The fit on the bike on the cover is looking wonky as hell. Tilted down saddle, bars like so so high above front wheel. Isn’t that 13″ head tube tall enough that they don’t need another 30cm of spacers?

Pit
Pit
7 years ago

I should note that I am also a tall rider and agree with some of Zinn’s theories for ideal fit for tall guys, but not the long cranks idea. Long legs is only part of the equation. Tall can have torso/leg ratio and also upper/lower leg ratio. This can mean long cranks are not always a good solution in that series of levers. He is dead right about one thing though, taller guys, larger frames, etc, they need bigger wheel size than 700c.

David
David
7 years ago

I picked up this book after it was covered the first time. TONS of information but a bit hard to read cover to cover. Well worth it as a reference guide!

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