All-new Canyon Stoic trail hardtail proves you don’t need MTB full-suspension to have fun

Canyon’s all-new aggressive trail Stoic mountain bike hardtails take their affordable mountain bikes to new levels, beyond the reach of the cross-country focused Exceed & Grand Canyons. Having geeked out on next-gen suspension layouts & optimized shock leverage ratios, Canyon’s MTB engineers have returned to the basics – a simple alloy hardtail mountain bike that builds on all the best modern trail geometry refinements to build a bike that’s fun to shred without having to overthink it…

Updated: Corrected fork travel & EU pricing

2021 Canyon Stoic all-mountain trail bike hardtails

2021 Canyon Stoic all-mountain enduro trail bike hardtail mountain bike

c. Canyon

Canyon’s new Stoic hardtail is described as a “rowdy hardtail”. An affordable alloy mountain bike with aggressive trail tendencies, this is a technical trail bike for riders that think full-squish enduro bikes are overkill, and for those of us without bottomless bike budgets.

2021 Canyon Stoic all-mountain enduro trail bike hardtail mountain bike, alloy frame detail

With a bit of happy medium geometry somewhere between modern XC & full-on progressive enduro, you should be able to have plenty of fun riding the new Stoic on flowy singletrack, technical descents, or honing your skills in the pumptrack and over local dirt jumps.

2021 Canyon Stoic all-mountain enduro trail bike hardtail mountain bike, headtube

Canyon’s goal with the Stoic was to build a “bombproof alloy hardtail” that could equally suit young riders as it could seasoned mountain bikers looking for a more technically capable trail bike. And with a wide size range and low-sloping toptubes, size-specific fork travel & wheelsize, there’s A Stoic to fit most all trail riders.

Technical Trail hardtail – Tech details

2021 Canyon Stoic all-mountain enduro trail bike hardtail mountain bike, rear end detail

The all-new alloy Stoic is welded from formed 6061-T6 aluminum tubing for simplicity & durability, getting certified to Canyon’s EWS-rated category 4 of trail abuse. Routing on the bike is a bit of everything – external brake cable routing for ease of service (& upgrade?), semi-internal derailleur routing exiting the open bottom of the downtube, and full internal dropper routing.

2021 Canyon Stoic all-mountain enduro trail bike hardtail mountain bike, tire clearance

The short-chainstay Stoic features a wide, curved chainstay yoke with big tire clearances and room for up to a max 30T chainring. It sticks with a standard 73mm threaded bottom bracket shell, gets a 30.9mm seatpost, a single set of water bottle bosses, and Boost 148 rear end spacing with a bolt on thru-axle.

All-mountain-ready, size-specific Trail Geometry

2021 Canyon Stoic all-mountain enduro trail bike hardtail mountain bike, wheelsize specific

27.5″ or 29er

The new Stoic is available in a wide six size range (XXS-XL) to fit riders from just 149cm (4′-10″) up to 2m (6′-6″) tall. To make that work, the three smallest sizes get 27.5″ wheels, while the three largest get 29″ wheels.

More than just two different wheelsizes, those smaller bikes all get 150mm 140mm travel forks, 165mm cranks and could fit massive plus-sized 2.8″ wide tires, plus size-specific dropper post travel (XXS 125mm, XS & S 150mm.) The larger 29ers get 140mm forks, 170mm cranks, and room for up to 2.5″ tires, plus 170mm travel dropper posts.

2021 Canyon Stoic all-mountain enduro trail bike hardtail mountain bike, geometry

corrected geo table

Geometry itself is said to “strike a balance between new school progressive trail bike geometry while keeping the Stoic agile and playful enough for the pump track and the jumps.” Canyon wanted to create a hardtail capable of technical trail riding, but realized that this isn’t an enduro bike.

Riders looking for an affordable & capable hardtail are likely still trying to find a bike that will make a good all-rounder – comfortable pedaling uphill as well as it does down. With a short & stiff rear end paired to a steep 75° seat angle (and no rear suspension sag), climbing efficiency shouldn’t be a problem for the Stoic.

2021 Canyon Stoic – Pricing, options & availability

2021 Canyon Stoic all-mountain enduro trail bike hardtail mountain bike, Stoic 2

2021 Canyon Stoic 2

For 2021 Canyon is offering three complete builds of their new affordable alloy hardtail. The cheapest way in is this 800€ Stoic 2, with a SR Suntour XCR34 fork, older generation Deore 1×11 drivetrain, Shimano MT200 brakes, but no dropper post for a weight claim of 14.89kg.

All Stoic builds share the same 30mm internal tubeless-ready Alex DP30 rims on Shimano MT400 hubs, wrapped in 2.35″ wide Schwalbe Magic Mary front, Hans Dampf rear Super Trail casing tires with Addix Soft grippy rubber.

Curiously, in the US this entry model is actually rebranded as the Stoic 3, selling for $1100.

2021 Canyon Stoic all-mountain enduro trail bike hardtail mountain bike, Stoic 3

2021 Canyon Stoic 3

Next up, the true Stoic 3 sells for 1200€ in every market EXCEPT the US, with RockShox Recon RL forks, SRAM SX Eagle 1×12, Level T brakes, Canyon’s Iridium dropper, and a weight claim of 14.76kg.

2021 Canyon Stoic all-mountain enduro trail bike hardtail mountain bike, Stoic 4

2021 Canyon Stoic 4

Lastly, the $1800 / 1700€ Stoic 4 tops out the range with a RockShox Pike Select RC fork and NX Eagle drivetrain, plus Guide T brakes, Descendant 6K cranks, the Iridium dropper, and a weight of 14.1kg.

2021 Canyon Stoic all-mountain enduro trail bike hardtail mountain bike, berm ridingAll three new alloy Canyon Stoic trail MTB hardtails are available now. “Maximum fun for minimum price.”

Canyon.com

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IzzyM
IzzyM
1 year ago

Good job Canyon!
These are long bikes. I’m usually a medium, but I reckon that 455-mm reach/623mm ETT on the M is too much for me.
And 2.5s fit on the 29er, but it comes spec’d with 2.35s???

Tim
Tim
1 year ago
Reply to  IzzyM

I really like the component spec of a NX drivetrain with a Pike fork for 1.8K, That is a great deal, but I do agree that the tire spec is a bit baffling and there are a bunch of companies that are guilty of this.

Connor
Connor
1 year ago

It is insane that $1,100 for a bicycle is considered affordable. This industry has become inflated beyond imagination. Over a THOUSAND dollars for a hardtail, and that is affordable? We have to take a step back and realize this is insane.

Nick Hill
Nick Hill
1 year ago
Reply to  Connor

Very good point from Connor, so right, bikes are too much money these days

Ken
Ken
1 year ago
Reply to  Nick Hill

My first mountain bike was a Trek 8000. It was $750. This was in 2001.

SpaceRaccoon
SpaceRaccoon
1 year ago
Reply to  Nick Hill

Unfortunately, that line of thinking is just not true. Bike prices haven’t significantly changed in the 25 years that the modern MTB has been around, and you get a much better bike for that money now. $1100 in 1996 got you a very basic alloy frame and an elastomer fork. You could still spend $10k on a bike then if you wanted to, even before adjusting for inflation. Spare us all the “good old days” bs.

Dylan Sutton
Dylan Sutton
1 year ago
Reply to  Connor

I bought my first MTB in 1991, a bike that was in Bicycling Magazine’s “Best mountain bikes between $1000-$1500” the year before. Having bought multiple bikes for myself, girlfriends, wife, now kids over the intervening 29 years, I would argue that there has never been a time when you could get as much performance for your buck as you can now.

If you think $1100 is insane and want a cheaper bike there are plenty out there, things like Giant’s Talon are still priced and specced as competitively as they ever were and the frames are better finished than they used to be. eBay specials with no-name parts are even cheaper than ever.

What’s changed is people’s expectations of what constitutes an entry-level mountain bike, and mountain bikers en-masse are voting with their wallets for bikes like this.

I don’t argue that this isn’t more expensive than some bikes from a decade ago with “Deore” gears and “Suntour” forks, but the performance level of the actual parts on this bike, not to mention the frame geometry, is leaps and bounds ahead of the cheaper bike of a decade ago. The Deore on this bike (while still last gen) is 1×11 and works just as nicely as 2010 XT did, the Suntour forks are a nicely damped 140mm air fork with 34mm alloy stanchions and 15mm through axles instead of the 80mm poorly damped coil sprung steel stanchioned boat anchors on ‘entry level bikes of yore, and even the bottom of the ladder MT200 hydros actually work nicely unlike the cable discs you might have seen before. Ride this bike back-to back against a 10 year old $1100 hardtail, and unless all your trails are smooth and only flow uphill I guarantee todays bike will be more fun and more capable in every respect.

SG
SG
1 year ago

Everything is expensive these days. Really not a bad price.

LemondRider
LemondRider
1 year ago

Nothing is expensive – just different levels of investment. Although, my local Chevy dealer has a $70K pick up truck. You can get a C8 corvette for that money.