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Browse, Compare, and buy Kona bikes with new Ride Online Program

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You can buy just about anything online these days, so naturally bikes are next. Many companies have already made the transition to online sales of some sort, though how they go about it varies from one to another. Kona announced today that they would be throwing their hat into the online sales ring with the Kona Ride Online USA and Ride Online Canada. Consumers can purchase the bikes online but then will have to head to the Kona dealer of their choice to pick it up…

Screenshots courtesy of Kona

Not sure where to begin? The Ride Online site allows you to easily compare models to make the selection process a bit easier. There are also personnel available through the site to help narrow your choice even further. This is an important part of the process due to the fact that if you make a mistake and order the wrong bike, you’ll be subject to a 20% restocking fee – and returns are only accepted on unridden bikes in as new condition.

Once selected, the ordering process will direct you to the closest Kona dealer or the dealer of your choice who will ultimately fulfill the order. Kona states that if the store has the bike in stock it can be ready in about 2 days. If it has to be shipped to the dealer, delivery time could vary between 4 and 7 days (2 days processing, and 2-5 days delivery). Bikes ordered online will have the same professional assembly as those purchased in store as well as the warranty. Anything over $1000 ships for free, but bikes under that price will include an additional $50 shipping charge. Bikes will also be subject to the local sales tax based on their delivery location.

Kona sought to make the program beneficial to the consumers, but also their dealers. While a 3% processing fee will be taken out of each sale, dealers can still get up to 100% of their regular margin as long as they stock at least one model from the same bike line. They gave the example of a consumer ordering a Roadhouse, the dealer would then get 100% of their margin (minus the 3% processing fee) if they stock any other model from the steel road bike platform like the Paddy Wagon, Penthouse, or Wheelhouse. Even if the dealer hasn’t had something in the platform in stock within the last 12 months, they’ll still receive 80% of their sales margin.

Currently limited to the USA and Canada, each has separate websites and shipping locations with bikes coming from Ferndale, WA for U.S. customers and from Vancouver, BC for Canadian.

rideonline.konaworld.com

rideonlineca.konaworld.com

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9 Comments
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bearcol
bearcol
6 years ago

This is a tepid response to modern purchasing trends. Quit dipping your toes Kona and dive into the new world of direct to customer service.

mudrock
mudrock
6 years ago
Reply to  bearcol

If they did direct sales their IBD network would promptly rebel, and drop their bikes.

bart
bart
6 years ago
Reply to  bearcol

Knowing how much goes into a proper build of a bike fresh out of the box from of the brands out there, would have the consumer direct customers absolutely livid. Frankly as a professional mechanic i would still have the bike shipped to a store to have them deal with all the facing, bleeding and set up.

bart
bart
6 years ago
Reply to  bart

“from most of the brands”

satisFACTORYrider
satisFACTORYrider
6 years ago

@bearcol- it’s called foreplay

Mike D
Mike D
6 years ago

In my opinion, this is how you do it. I’ve said it before, I’m sure to say it again many times–the folks at Kona are a d-mned good group! You present an avenue for the LBS to still make a few bucks, and incentivize them to carry more of your products in doing so. 20% restocking fee ought to prevent people from just getting trigger happy and ordering bikes all willy nilly, without in depth comparisons/sizing research. The LBS doesn’t get stuck with the product should the customer decide they don’t want it… sounds good! Other brands take note!

Bog
Bog
6 years ago

I really can’t imagine any scenario where I’d want to order online then pick up the bike at my LBS. if I’m going to deal with my LBS anyways why wouldn’t I just go there, chat with them about sizing, specs, etc then have them order it? What am I missing here?

stiingya
6 years ago
Reply to  Bog

Your missing all the chatting about sizing, specs, etc. You can just pick what you want and order it… done!

I was looking at a Big Honzo before Christmas, they didn’t have them in yet but did have the Big Kahuna. The dude took it over to the mechanic and put air in the tires before taking me out to their “track” to try it out. They put THIRTY pounds of pressure in a PLUS tire…??? When I questioned him about it he was all proud of the set up because that’s how he likes to run PLUS…??? (I even question whether it was MORE than 30 cause that tire was HARD!)

I mean, WTF…

Neither of our Kona dealers was willing to work with me on a BigHonzo for sizing. I’m between the L and XL. (Heck even the L is LONG) So not sure on the size. Both shops were telling me, you order it, you bought it. Were talking a 2500 dollar bike, not $12,500.00. 2017 before the year 2017 even started. Plus size hardtail = pretty trendy item to have in the shop anyway. It says “Honzo” on the top tube, enough said..

What kind of bike shops don’t think they can sell a Large Big Honzo over the whole riding season if I ended up needing the XL? I’ve never had a bike shop that didn’t let you have a special order on layaway when it came in. I’ve never had a shop not say they’d work with me on the sizing if it ended up wrong. There are some GREAT shops in town, but IMO not the Kona dealers!!!

whatever
whatever
6 years ago

If I’m ordering online, it’s not going to be something I have to go get at the shop. The advantage of the local shop is ride before you buy, but if you take that away, then no advantage and no reason to go. Nearly every shop I’ve stepped foot in (allot of them), I felt like the pork chop in front of the hungry dog, or the non-bro not worth the time. I’m much more likely to order the frame I want (and it won’t be one of the overpriced big boy frames either), and do my own build the way “I” want it, if I’m just going to have to buy a size and hope it fits properly.

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