Hearing gravity-fueled, all-around mountain bike legend Cédric Gracia had his own signature line of disc brake pads from a company I hadn’t heard of, my first thought was… Huh? What makes them special? Well, it turns out DiscoBrakes has been making aftermarket brake pads for over a decade. And their newest Copper-Free pads claim some solid performance boosts, with a side benefit of being easier on the environment.

Cédric Gracia edition DiscoBrakes Copper-Free pads

Cédric paired up with DiscoBrakes at the start of last year, and has since played a role in both testing and R&D for the company’s disc brake pad range. Not surprisingly after a couple decades of top-level competition on mountain bikes, he’s become quite picky with his equipment. And the Copper Free pads from DiscoBrakes sound like they live up to the hype.

DiscoBrakes claims that the copper-free, carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide compound delivers powerful, well mannered modulation in a brake pad that is both long-wearing & quiet running in both wet & dry riding. That ticks all the right boxes, with the extra upside of taking heavy metals out of the braking material so they don’t litter the trail with harmful metals as you brake.

DiscoBrakes claims that the Cédric Gracia Edition Copper Free pads are the best performing pads they’ve ever made. Not to mention their environmental benefit.

DiscoBrakes sells the green steel-backed, CG Copper Free pads for most major disc brake calipers, including Shimano, SRAM, Tektro, TRP & more, for around $13 per wheel, or $40 for a four-pack good for two bikes. Weights claim to be around 22g for a set of XTR pads, up to 26g for the Magura MT5 version. That sounds good enough that I think we’ll have to give them a try over the winter.

DiscoBrakes.com

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feldybikes
4 years ago

Wait, what’s the environmental benefit coming from here? From the name can I assume it’s eliminating copper? I guess it’s not a particularly light metal, but it’s not like it’s a poison such as lead, cadmium, mercury, etc.

I realize this may come across as typical BR peanut gallery troll-ism. But seriously….

Dano
Dano
4 years ago
Reply to  feldybikes

Mining for copper is damaging to the environment, like most mining. By eliminating copper, they are making a greener product.

feldybikes
4 years ago
Reply to  Dano

“That ticks all the right boxes, with the extra upside of taking heavy metals out of the braking material so they don’t litter the trail with harmful metals as you brake.”

David
David
4 years ago
Reply to  Dano

I would not say that using carbon fibers instead makes the product greener.

Telemahn
Telemahn
4 years ago
Reply to  feldybikes

Copper is extremely toxic to most aquatic species. Brake dust gets washed into streams and lakes and is a very real concern for fisheries. While mountain bikes probably are not a big contributor, they are one of the only sources of bio-available copper in some watersheds.

Florian
4 years ago

“copper-free, carbon fiber reinforced, environmental friendly”?
Are you kidding me? As if carbon fiber is any more environmentally friendlier than copper which is basically inert and recyclable. Carbon fiber, as much as I like it is more like asbestos.

kimbo305
kimbo305
4 years ago
Reply to  Florian

If it’s a way to make user of disposed carbon fiber products, maybe that wouldn’t be a bad thing. But I agree that it’s a claim that can’t be made so glibly.

Telemahn
Telemahn
4 years ago
Reply to  Florian

Florian, copper is about as inert as arsenic, mercury, lead….

neil
neil
4 years ago

but copper oxide is green…. literally!

Seraph
Seraph
4 years ago

Can’t seem to find the pads on their website (that looks like it was designed in the mid-90s) at all. Super good marketing there.