Looking for a bike that can do it all? Well, depending on your definition of “do it all”, the upcoming Hudski Doggler just might be the ticket. Set to officially launch later this summer, the Doggler is the first product from Hudski – an upstart bike brand based in Sausalito, CA. Created by long time friends Will Hudson, and Brian Szykowny, the duo have a mixed background including industrial design (including a stint at Specialized for Brian), ceramics and lighting design, and the jointly operated Cannonball Studio.

Over the past five years, Will and Brian have been working on what they see as the perfect do-it-all bike. The project started as an ultra-light weight city bike but slowly evolved into a bike that takes cues from a lot of different categories and combines them with modern standards to create something pretty unique and totally fun.

Hudski Doggler aluminum frame sketch

One of a kind frame and fork

Starting with an aluminum frame, the Doggler is designed to run either 700c or 27.5″ wheels. Tire clearance is massive with room for either 700c x 53mm (2.1″) or 27.5 x 2.6″ rubber. Those wheels are held in place by 142 x 12 and 100 x 15mm thru axles, and the frame runs 160/180mm flat mount Shimano SLX brakes (the bent chainstay allows for a post mount adapter if desired). Cable routing will be internal, along with internal dropper post routing which is there since every Doggler will include a dropper post.

Intended for a 1x mountain bike drivetrain, the Doggler includes a 73mm threaded bottom bracket and clearance for up to a 40t chainring.

Hudski Doggler carbon fork

Since the Doggler is a very unique bike, there wasn’t a fork available to meed Hudski’s needs. So they designed their own. The carbon fork has a tapered steerer to go with the 44mm head tube on the frame, and 400mm axle to crown with a 44mm offset to match the geometry which is loosely based on modern trail mountain bikes. Like the frame, the fork has mounts for water bottles, a rack, and fenders as well as internal routing for dynamo lighting and the front brake.

Hudski Doggler geometry

Geometry

About that geometry, we haven’t tried the bike yet so we’ll let Hudski offer their explanation on the numbers: “The frame geometry is loosely based on a modern trail bike, infused with cues from XC and Gravel frame design, making it an extremely well rounded and capable bike suited for city shenanigans, fire road epics, and flowy technical single track. Its most notable geometry attributes are its long reach, steep seat tube angle, long rear center and long trail numbers. Rather than designing around an overly slack head tube (the seemingly current trend in the MTB market), we decided to drive our trail number by the fork offset, and in doing so it helped mitigate wheel flop (good for low speed maneuverability) while maintaining a relatively high trail number (good for high speed stability). We used a long reach number to allow the use of 40-70mm stems improving control and steering responsiveness. The steep seat tube angle is good for climbing and optimized for smooth dropper post actuation. Rather than following the trend of short chain stays we went with long-ish chain stays to increase stability, allow heel clearance when running panniers, and increase overall comfort. Don’t worry, it can still bunny hop, wheelie, and manual just fine.”

Hudski Doggler colors Hudski Doggler tire choice

City, Gravel, or MTB Builds

Given the multiple personalities of the Doggler, it will be sold in three different builds – City, Gravel, and MTB. Tire choice will vary depending on those packages with the City build using a Maxxis Grifter 29 x 2.0″, the Gravel build using a Maxxis Rambler 700c x 50mm, and the MTB opting for a Maxxis Rekon 27.5 x 2.6″ wheel and tire set up. The City build also gets a different handlebar with more backsweep in the Hudski Longhorn 27 vs. the Hudski Longhorn 16 used on the Gravel & MTB builds.

Hudski Doggler build list

All builds will include a 1×12 Shimano SLX drivetrain with Raceface Ride cranks with a 34t chainring and a PNW Rainier dropper post. Complete builds will start at $2,000 in three different colors, and the frameset will be offered as well. As mentioned, the bike and brand will officially launch later in the summer, but if you want to keep up to date on Hudski’s progress, they have an email sign up live on their website below.

hudskibikes.com

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17 Comments
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adilosnave
adilosnave
2 years ago

Interesting. They kinda threw everything plus the kitchen sink at it in terms of features. We place labels on every bike (gravel, hybrid, road, downhill, XC, etc.) but I think this one can simply be referred to as ‘bike.’ Just bike.

Heffe
Heffe
2 years ago

hybrid

Brian
Brian
2 years ago

Sounds kind of like a higher end Surly Bridge Club. Wonder if they will offer a frameset option as well?

Seraph
Seraph
2 years ago
Reply to  Brian

The last paragraph reveals all: “Complete builds will start at $2,000 in three different colors, and the frameset will be offered as well.”

AJ
AJ
2 years ago

on header and sketch pic, dropped nds chainstay. non drop on ds.
can anyone explain?

theseus
theseus
2 years ago
Reply to  AJ

Those wheels are held in place by 142 x 12 and 100 x 15mm thru axles, and the frame runs 160/180mm flat mount Shimano SLX brakes (the bent chainstay allows for a post mount adapter if desired).

Sean
Sean
2 years ago

Congratulations you have invented the mountain bike

Bryanus
Bryanus
2 years ago
Reply to  Sean

Comment gold right here!

theseus
theseus
2 years ago

I like the thought of this for a do-it-all bike but $2000 is a bit steep for my wallet. It’s got good parts on the build, but for a bike to ramble around on, I’d max out at $800 – feels a bit better locking it up outside the bar or grocery store and walking away at that price…..best of luck Hudski. I wish you success.

Ched
Ched
2 years ago

Looks like a mtn bike that would be very slow on the road, looks like a stable touring bike that isnt that comfortable, looks like a hybrid bike thats tires are too big

Looks like a bike

alex
alex
2 years ago

First thing to go will be that bent chainstay. Just design for post mounts – flat mounts will probably not trickle down to cheap groups for a while (screw you Shimano). If so that will be V2.

Also, you need a blue color – save that for the frameset.

Riley Smith
2 years ago
Reply to  alex

Shimano have flat-mount calipers for every group with hydraulic brake options. For cable-only series, there are cable-actuated flat-mount calipers like BR-RS305, and multiple other companies make flat-mount calipers. Paul, TRP, Tektro—the price range is fully covered.

The problem is with post-mount. New forks often don’t have a post-mount option, and so some retrofits and new frames require different models of caliper front and rear, which results in different feel and power, as well as higher expense if you go with a Shimano setup. Because Shimano doesn’t have post-mount options across its series hydraulic brakes, you have to buy lever, hose, and caliper separately, and that’s often more expensive. (SRAM have a post option for the AXS groups.)

Seraph
Seraph
2 years ago
Reply to  Riley Smith

Um, all of Shimano’s mountain bike brakes are post mount. And you can bleed any Shimano lever to any Shimano caliper. Same for SRAM. The reason why I want post mount vs flat mount is that the latter is almost impossible to align 90% of the time because the flat mounting area is almost never actually flat. Post mount offers a lot more adjustability, even when the posts themselves aren’t 100% flat and clean.

Mathias
Mathias
2 years ago

… that front fork is propably limited to 180mm (7″) disc rotor on front…

Matthias
Matthias
2 years ago

I don’t know what ds is, but if you’re referring to the picture in the Geometry section: I suppose the dropped bit is just hidden behind the front chainstay because the camera is quite a bit higher than in the title pic.

Riley Smith
2 years ago

Yeah, nobody makes a fork like that these days except for Otso, Enve, Crust, MEC, Whisky, Ritchey, Salsa…