Last spring when the team behind 8bar introduced their newest adjustable geometry all-road Mitte bike, one of its key features was the flexibility to transform into an all-surface adventure bike. Developed to give themselves a bike to ride both the rolling gravel around Berlin and be ready to transition to proper all-road touring when the time came, they took the Mitte to north Africa to test it out. 8bar’s founder, its product manager, and a freelance photographer packed up the new Mittes and headed into the desolate gravel roads of the High Atlas Mountains in Morocco. Just now getting a wide release, their 8bar Adventures-Morocco trip documentary offers a glimpse into a place few cyclists pedal. Take another look at their loaded down aluminum bikes & watch their story after the break…

8bar already put together a quick two part blog back last spring detailing their trip, and we got a preview of their film earlier in the year. But now it has been given more of a general release so we can share it on Vimeo.

photos courtesy 8bar

In the end they struggle at the start of the trip, not because of the bikes per se, but because they underestimated how rough, steep, and loose the climbing up would be and ended up doing some extended hike-a-biking with heavy loaded bikes. But the alloy bikes decked out in a SRAM Rival double, Blackburn bags, and DT Swiss R32 wheels carried them on their way, even if they got a little more adventure than planned for on the return to Marrakesh. The disc brake aluminum Mitte with its aluminum fork sells as a frameset for just 600€, or complete bikes from around 1450€.

8bar High Atlas Adventure
836km total over 8 days, and 11.986m of climbing

8bar-bikes.com

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Morten Knudsen
Morten Knudsen
5 years ago

Dreaming….

mudrock
mudrock
5 years ago

I guess the bikes held up. No word on how many flats or mechanicals they had.

8barbikes
8barbikes
5 years ago
Reply to  mudrock

We had two flats and no mechanicals.

JustSayin
JustSayin
5 years ago

That SRAM is looking like Shimano more and more.

yard dog
yard dog
5 years ago

Really enjoyed this video. Great filming and narration!

David
David
5 years ago

Inspiring video, great filming. Makes me want to start planning another bike tour myself.

gringo
gringo
5 years ago

Cool video and nice route, but man my back hurts just thinking about riding that on a CX bike.
Seems like a rigid 29er would have been a better choice….

Rocky Balboa
Rocky Balboa
5 years ago

What is it with hipsters obsessing with front loaded touring set ups? Front panniers + bar bags and no rear panniers would give a dramatically unstable bike regardless of fork trail measurements.. Not to mention bad aero and funky handling on rough trails (wheel spin city/good luck trying to bunny hop).

Kernel Flickitov
Kernel Flickitov
5 years ago
Reply to  Rocky Balboa

What’s the point of asking a question with innuendo and conjecture? Front loading a bicycle has only been around for about 100 years. Wake up.

8barbikes
8barbikes
5 years ago
Reply to  Rocky Balboa

The bike handling was great with this set-up. Bunny hopping at 8:13min. 😉

dave
dave
5 years ago

Had the exact same thought. And the bikes even have rack mounts. Totally nonsensical setup.

Related question…why the hell would you have the brand name 8bar (116 PSI) for these bikes?

Kernel Flickitov
Kernel Flickitov
5 years ago
Reply to  dave

What doesn’t make sense for you apparently works famously for others. Other bikepackers disparaging others for their set up? Ok, I’ve heard everything now.

Flux
Flux
5 years ago

Isn’t this something you learn as a kid? I distinctly remember two scenarios. Friend trying to sit on the handlebar and it being damn near impossible to steer or ride. The other, friend standing on rear pegs, OMG so much easier! Your load should go on the back, or at minimum be balanced. Looks way too front loaded to me.

Paul
Paul
5 years ago
Reply to  Flux

You guys have obviously never worshiped at the church of Jan Heine. You also don’t know much about low trail.

mudrock
mudrock
5 years ago

That setup would help balance the load on the wheels, though. Front/rear weight distribution is typically 30/70 or so with rider alone.

RegularJoe
RegularJoe
5 years ago

Jeez there’s a lot snobs on these forums. I can imagine why so many non-cyclists dislike cyclists…