2015 Commencal Supreme DH V4 action shot
It’s always exciting to hear that a company has gone ‘carte blanche’ and completely re-designed a well known bike. You can only assume they have something interesting coming, and it looks like Commencal will spark up a few conversations with their new 2015 Supreme DH V4.

The big news is that the Supreme DH V4’s suspension has changed drastically since the last version and is now a high pivot point, single-pivot design instead of the outgoing ‘four bar’ linkage driven single-pivot setup. The company says going with a high pivot point offers some advantages, but also acknowledged that it’s hard to make it aesthetically pleasing. That said, they have done a great job of hiding the idler behind the seat stay and maintaining the frame’s clean lines, which you can see more of below…

2015 Commencal Supreme DH V4 frame prototype

Commencal’s new high pivot point concept was first tested on a prototype 160mm all-mountain frame called the Meta HPP. After experimenting with the idler and refining the ride, it was approved by team riders and adapted into the new V4. Commencal’s positioning of the idler aims to counteract the dreaded single-pivot ‘kickback’ effect that limits the free motion of the suspension, particularly during pedalling and over rough stuff. Its position on the swingarm also creates enough anti-squat to provide a lively feel for some nice pop out of corners.

2015 Commencal Supreme DH V4 frame, front

The company says the V4’s new linkage system allows for better leverage ratio control and optimized frame stiffness, with some degree of compliance. It also changes the wheel path for more rearward travel, to help maintain speed through rough terrain. Commencal went to considerable effort to keep the center of gravity as low as possible.

The shock’s progressiveness was designed to be supple for excellent grip in the initial stroke but feel more supportive at mid-travel versus the Supreme V3. Travel has increased to 220mm from 190 or 200mm on the 650B and 26” V3’s – Commencal views this as additional bottom-out protection for huge impacts, and say the first 200mm of the V4’s travel has a similar character to the outgoing Supreme.

2015 Commencal Supreme DH V4 complete build

The Supreme DH V4’s headset cups and rear dropouts can be swapped out to adjust chainstay length, BB height and reach with no impact on the frame angles. The head tube angle is fixed at 62.5°, but the reach can be adjusted with the different cups by -10/-8/-5/0/+5/+8/+10 mm. Commencal has shortened the chainstay on the V4, but they say the difference isn’t as extreme as it sounds on paper due to the more rearward wheel path.

2015 Commencal Supreme DH V4 fork bumper and cable guide 2015 Commencal Supreme DH V4 frame details

You may have noticed the Commencal hasn’t gone carbon. The V4’s frame is made from 6066 aluminum, which the brand apparently prefers for reliability reasons. It uses 7075 T6 aluminum axles and oversized bearings in the pivots, and includes some nice details like fork bumpers with integrated cable path, a rear fender, roller cover for the idler, internal derailleur cable routing and a dual density seat stay protector.

Specs for 2015 Commencal Supreme DH V4

Tall riders will be glad to hear the Supreme DH V4 will be available in four sizes, from small to XL. There’s no word yet on build specs, pricing or availability dates, but keep an eye on Commencal’s website for information.

commencalusa.com

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Eric E. Strava
Eric E. Strava
6 years ago

I don’t think anti-squat has anything to do with cornering, but simply the suspension’s reaction to acceleration forces generated by the chain, of which this frame handles really well by virtue of the idler. But with a strongly rearward axle path, I do think that “pop out of corners” would be compromised by the growing wheelbase under compression.

Not saying that the characteristics described are not true, but it does look like they were attributed incorrectly to the various design features.

G
G
6 years ago

I’m curious how much pedaling power you lose with the idler.

Bog
Bog
6 years ago

Nice bike but that XL size gas to be the smallest XL on the market. The reach is tiny!

craigsj
craigsj
6 years ago

Very tactfully said, Eric. Anti-squat has nothing to do with “pop out of corners”. Anything gets published here.

As for efficiency lost in the idler, it depends on the diameter but it is a downhill bike after all. Recumbents suffer much more from this yet they manage. Even if losses are doubled, which they could be, they are very low to begin with. An IGH will be worse than this.

Idlers practically require 1x drivetrains which, until recently, limited their appeal to the broader market. With wide range 1x drivetrains I think manufacturers should look harder at these designs.

Rocko
Rocko
6 years ago

I don’t really understand the title. The Supreme DH has always been single pivot, like a Kona. This frame is still a single pivot, however that pivot is moved much higher. As for the shock actuate is still driven by linkage arms.
So the it would be more ideal to call this article: C. S. DH frames goes for high pivot this year

KJR
KJR
6 years ago

Speaking of anything getting published: “commencal’s supreme dh v4 downhill bike goes single-pivot for 2015”

Every version of the supreme DH has been a linkage actuated, single-pivot design… The only thing special here is the pivot location.

Steve Fisher
Steve Fisher
6 years ago

OK, I have to admit a big mistake was made in this article referring to the previous model V3 as a ‘four bar’ suspension design. A small misinterpretation of text created a large factual error, and I do apologize to our readers for the mixup.
I have corrected any reference to the incorrect info about the previous suspension design.

Adam
Adam
6 years ago

Eric, I doubt that the wheelbase will increase at all. Look at the head tube angle compared to the pivot location. On most bikes wheelbase actually decreases as the suspension compresses.