Industry nine fat bike road disc (1)

Whether your choice of wheels is fat or skinny, Industry Nine has a few new additions to the line which may look good on your ride. For the road set, Industry Nine continues to work with Reynolds Cycling to source their carbon rims. That means more tubeless ready profiles and the move to ink jet graphics for a premium look.

Along with a few new models for road, Industry Nine was also showing off a new fat bike wheel set that should have the fat tire crowd excited…

Industry nine fat bike road disc (16)

Industry nine fat bike road disc (14) Industry nine fat bike road disc (10)

Industry nine fat bike road disc (11)

In addition to the new C29 disc for road or cross, tubeless ready profiles are now found on the 29, 41, and 62 millimeter deep carbon rims. Disc brake options are available on the C29 and C41 wheels which use a 29 and 41 mm deep rim respectively and a 25 mm external and 17 mm internally wide rim. Mated with the Torch disc hubs, prices for the C29 start at $2500.

Industry nine fat bike road disc (3)

Industry nine fat bike road disc (4) Industry nine fat bike road disc (5)

To go along with their high end carbon builds, Industry Nine now offers a more affordable aluminum fat bike wheel set built to their Torch hubs with their aluminum spokes. Offered in almost every fat bike hub combination imaginable, Big Rig 845s use an 84.5 mm wide rim that is tubeless ready and ships with tubeless valves and tape. Wheelset weight is said to be 2530g and the wheels will sell for $1275 and will begin shipping in 60 to 90 days.

We’re told Industry Nine will have even more new goods to show at Interbike so stay tuned.

industrynine.net

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K11
K11
6 years ago

Ink jet graphics throughout the bike industry on wheels/rims, is my personal pet peeve. I prefer a sticker application, Why?I remove all rim decals for a “clean” look. Personal preference, I’m sure that I am not alone. Besides graphic design applications are very subjective.

Ryan
Ryan
6 years ago

@K11, totally agree. As a graphic designer myself, I’m quite particular with the aesthetics of my gear. Subtlety speaks louder than the screaming graphics most seem to favor.

LateSleeper
LateSleeper
6 years ago

Too bad the road disc hubs still seem to be 6-bolt type.

LOLWUT
LOLWUT
6 years ago

More like: too bad shimano refuses to make their top shelf rotors in 6 bolt.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
6 years ago

I don’t care about logos but plenty of people do. When stickers start pealing, they look like crap and manufacturers prefer their logos stay there so people can know what kind of wheels their oggling

xcracer
xcracer
6 years ago

Why would Shimano want to take its highest end rotor and bastardize it with such an inferior mounting method?

Honestly, centerlock is better in every aspect I can think of.
If you can give me one reason 6 bolt is better than centerlock, I’d love to hear it.

JR
JR
6 years ago

Weight.

StephenM
StephenM
6 years ago

Centerlock splines have rotational play. Lock your front brake and rock the bike forward and back, and you can feel it. Feels like a loose headset. May not matter while riding, but it bugs me. Also rotors are more expensive, and as mentioned, heavier.

Alex @ Hermes Sport
6 years ago

Centerlock is also very restrictive as far as what size bearings you can use in your hub – it forces people to adopt very conservative hub designs in order to use it.

Jon
Jon
6 years ago

There will be CL i9 hubs shortly. Reynolds had a version built in to their black label wheels on their stand at the show.

xcracer
xcracer
6 years ago

Very good points made.
I never would have guessed that centerlock were heavier (having an aluminium center carrier).
I also didn’t consider the bearing restriction put on hubs by the centerlock standard.
As for play, I’ve never seen or heard of a Shimano hub / rotor combo that has play.
Thanks for the insights!

Mac
Mac
6 years ago

First of all, you dont brake going backwards, so there is no way you should complain about play in the splines. Second, if you do the rocking test and see the rotor move on the hub, the lock ring isn’t nearly tight enough. Finally, the rocking you think is the rotor is likely the pads moving in the caliper. This has been an ongoing issue with shimano brakes for a long time.

chasejj
chasejj
6 years ago

StephenM- I have never experienced any play on CL rotors/hubs I have used. The play if any would be far less than a floating disc design in 6 bolt which is many of the higher end offerings.
As far as bearing size. Is that really an issue? I doubt it unless it is some sort of marketing directive for a particular hub mfg.
Weight-that weight is very minimal and the increased contact area for heat dissipation is far more meaningful.

Mike
Mike
6 years ago

@chasejj “As far as bearing size. Is that really an issue?” It is if you have a lefty…