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EB17: Vaude packs up for adventure with bikepacking bags, panniers & enduro packs

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Vaude has been making packs far longer than they have had any cycling gear. Every year now they refine more bike-specific bags, focusing on key cycling segments to get into the details. 2018 will be no different. Vaude introduces their first Trail bikepacking bags geared towards off-road touring. Then there is the convertible ExCycling Back pannier and a new Bracket enduro touring backpack family.

Trail family bikepacking bags

The new Trail family is a departure for Vaude who mostly made only bulkier traditional packs to fit fixed racks. But embracing off-road touring & bikepacking the trail bags go rack free and get lightweight, expandable construction. Their idea here is to provide ultralight hauling for short adventure rides. Those being trips that strap just minimal gear on your ride for a quick bit of freedom by bike.

Trailfront handlebar bag

With a 19l hauling capacity thanks to a massive double roll PVC-free drybag, the handlebar Trailfront bag is where Vaude wants to haul most of the gear. The Trailfront uses a semi-rigid mounting carrier that you adjust & install to your bike and then supports the drybag and anything else you need to haul (like a tent or bedroll.) Vaude opted for this modular style pack with foam block spacers. Since it can often be tricky to get the bar bag perfectly positioned and strapped down, the carrier stays attached to the bike for the full duration of your tour.

Trailframe frame bag

The Trailframe is a bit of a different story. It is again something of a roll-down drybag, but incorporates several additional straps to secure it to the top & seattubes. Then ultimately, the main roll-top closure secures the bag also around the downtube.

The 8l Trailframe pack looks like the most bloated of the bags. And it certainly isn’t something you’ll likely want to strap on a road or gravel bike with low q-factor cranks. But the straps are adjustable in such a way that you can get some of your heavier items lower in the frame. And with that adjustability, it can even squeeze around to fit inside some full suspension frames.

Trailsaddle saddle bag

The 12l Trailsaddle again carries another big piece of the load. Again using a flexible carrier frame to secure a roll-closure drybag, the Trailsaddle makes it easy to pull the lightweight green bag out & off the bike, so you can quickly access your gear once you make it to camp.

Combined the entire family of Trail bikepacking bags gives up to 39l of hauling capacity to support your next micro-adventure.

ExCycling Back convertible pannier bag

The new ExCycling Back serves double duty as both a standard pannier, quick release mounted onto a rear rack, but then also to work as a shoulder bag once you arrive at your destination by bike. On the bike, adjustable quick clamps grab ahold of a rear rack. Once you pop it off the bike, a roll-down cover hides all the hardware. That makes it look more like a standard shoulder bag and less cycling-specific.

A couple of fixed posts on either side allow a shoulder strap to be quickly attached off the bike. There are even detachable backpack straps as well.

A typical roll-top closure main compartment and second front pocket give the bag 27l of hauling capacity. Then, a zippered expander between the two lets you add another 18l to fit more gear inside. The pannier features a reinforced fabric with reflective accents and a Eco water-resistant treatment. And when it really starts to come down, an integrated rain cover provided full waterproof coverage.

Bracket Xalps 28 enduro touring backpack

The Bracket is Vaude’s latest on-the-bike backpack, designed for extended technical off-road tours rather than regular riding. With enduro touring in mind, the Bracket packs storage into a stable bag focusing on high freedom of movement.

Five models are available for different lengths of excursions and different riders. Men’s models get sized in 10, 16 & 22l, while there is a women’s specific fit model at 16l. But this is the biggest of the lineup – the Bracket Xalps 28 – a pack developed for multi-day alpine touring.

This 28l pack has three main body pockets,plus an extra for a hydration bladder. Each of the bags features a removable tool compartment, an external helmet carrier, and integrated rain cover, plus reflective accents throughout for improved visibility.

Much of the bags’ tech comes to the suspension shared by all five variants, the arched Ergonomic Movement Panel back. With a light plastic structure, its mesh-backed padding, and the light but wide waist belt, it claims to stabilize the load on your back without adding much bulk. Besides all the storage of the main pack, the compressive waist belt also incorporates large expanding pockets to keep snacks and even spare clothing close at hand. The waist belt design is unique in itself, attaching all the way around the front base of the backpack (instead of the typical attachment just at the bottom of the padded back) so that you cinch & tighten down the entire pack when you tighten the waist belt.

All primary fabrics in the Bracket family are Bluesign certified, with the polyester 50% recycled from PET bottles. Even down to the details & trim, Vaude worked to develop the new bags to meet their own strict internal Green Shape Label environmental standards.

The new bikepacking bags, convertible pannier, and Bracket enduro backpacks are all Spring/Summer 2018 products, slated for availability at the start of next year.

Vaude.com

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Collin S
Collin S
5 years ago

Is it just me or do bamboo bikes look like something out of flintstones?

John
John
5 years ago

Looking good, interested in seeing the weights and prices. Wouldn’t mind if someone tested the actual internal volume. In the past Vaude had a tendency to overestimate these numbers.

Reverend Dick
Reverend Dick
5 years ago

…well, the #bikepacking set-up is certainly in keeping with the bike upon which it is slung. Is this @bicyclepubes?

Stephen Keller
Stephen Keller
5 years ago

Am I the only one who thinks that having a velcro strap rubbing across the top-tube-head-tube joint is a bad idea? It seems like this is just asking for abrasion damage to the finish and eventual corrosion issues.

Brer
Brer
5 years ago

I thought they packed up and left the US market?

S
S
5 years ago

@stephenkeller yes it is indeed is a horrible idea, and many people have complained about faded or scratched top tubes. I guess though that if tape was applied (taking care to reduce its adhesivity by sticking and unsticking at a hand in order not to take off paint when removed) no damage would occure I guess. I would definitely though avoid all these torque generating seatpost bags, they seem to strain a lot a frame at the TT-ST junction.

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