Edco’s Wheel Saving TEN+ELEVEN Monoblock Cassette Now Available through Reynolds Cycling

Edco MonoblockNew standards got you down? While changing specifications often results in obsolete equipment, they also provide a chance for other companies to step up and offer solutions to keep that pair of wheels out of retirement. That’s the case with the Edco Monoblock cassette. Named after its one piece construction, the hardened chromoly steel design also aides in durability. Edco offers a number of 11 speed Monoblock cassettes for Shimano and Campagnolo drivetrains, but that doesn’t help those who are still riding wheels with a 10 speed freehub body.

That’s where the Monoblock TEN+ELEVEN adapter cassette comes in to play. Since the cassette is all one piece, the end of the cassette can be extended from the freehub. Used in conjunction with the special TEN+ELEVEN lock nut, and you have an 11 speed cassette that should fit on most 10 speed wheels. Even better, the cassettes are now available in the U.S. through Reynolds Cycling…

Edco Monoblock2Even with the entire cassette made from a single piece of hardened steel, the weight is still quite impressive at 163g (claimed). Much like the SRAM Red cassette, only the base of the cassette and the very end actually contact the freehub body, and the front of the cassette has extra long indexing cams to mate with the shorter 10 speed freehub bodies. Currently available in only 11-25t from Reynolds for $230, Edco’s site hints at other gearing options available as well. Assuming the cassette shifts well enough, you can hold on to those 10 speed only wheels for at least another season…

edco.ch

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James S
James S
7 years ago

I thought Shimano 11 speed worked on normal (8/9/10 speed) freehub bodies and that SRAM needed a new freehub because they wanted a 10 teeth cog. Am I wrong? And if I am wrong, why would you want to “upgrade” to 11 speed from 10 speed anyway? Tight ratios for road bikes are nice, but at this point can anyone really tell the difference or is everybody just shifting 2 or 3 gears at a time like I do?

justinhomewood
justinhomewood
3 years ago
Reply to  James S

SRAM finally got their 10T…

Sam
Sam
7 years ago

Wouldn’t it stick out enough that(on some frames) it would rub?
Other than that potential issue it looks great.

Andrew
Andrew
7 years ago

Afraid you’re incorrect James S; 11-Speed cassettes usually only work on 11spd freehub bodies or those that were, seemingly, pre-made for 11-spd compatability (like Mavic freehubs). There is no 10T cog for Sram road; only MTB.

I second Sam’s concern about the overhang rubbing frames. I also assume that use of this cassette would involve re-tuning the rear derailleur every time you want to use ‘normal’ 11-spd wheels?

pdxfixed
pdxfixed
7 years ago

James S – Road 11s uses a slightly longer freehub than 8/9/10. SRAM’s XD driver for MTB 11s is a whole different beast to allow a 10t cog.

jeremy
jeremy
7 years ago

Only the new 11 speed xtr works on old 10 speed body’s. Learned this the hard way. Had to buy new wheel set when I was already locked into cx1.

alistair
alistair
7 years ago

james, everybody can tell the difference and everybody is not shifting 2 or 3 gears at a time. im not syaing that 11 speed will win you a rice over someone with 10, but it certainly allows you to handle most situations quite a bit better.

Jo-slow
Jo-slow
7 years ago

@ James S

Nop. Only on Mavic’s 10s shimano/sram wheel will take a 11s cassette : http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/07/bikes-and-tech/technical-faq/technical-faq-1011-speed-compatibility_337803

I also think ratios are tight enough on a 10 speed road set-up. But when my current groupset/wheelset will ware out in 2-3 years, 11 will be the only option anyway.

The only bummer is my racing wheels, on which I roll less then 1000k a year will still be 10’s. This is why this cassette is interesting for me (they are not Mavics.)

dave
dave
7 years ago

Wheels manufacturing have been making a similar cassette for years. Its an 11s campag cassette with shimano freehub splines. Fits on all shimano/sram freehubs and works perfectly. I’ve been running it on my c35 tubs for 2 years

Milessio
Milessio
7 years ago

Sam, I would guess that using a narrower 11spd chain, the smallest cog could stick out a little more. Also, being a monoblock design, the rear of the largest cog could easily be dished to sit closer to the spokes at its outside diameter (where the teeth are). So, depending on the extra spacing needed, either/or both the above could be used?

shafty
shafty
7 years ago

I hope it comes with a tube spacer. It probably won’t last long with the whole cassette being compressed from end to end.

Darryl
Darryl
7 years ago

Shafts, look at the structure, it doesn’t need a tube spacer to support it.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
7 years ago

This will be a problem for “some” wheels. I do think the RD will clear on most though. I think they should have come out with an 11-28 first though. That would give more clearance than an 11-25. Its amazing how big of a difference 3 teeth on a cog makes with how close the RD gets to your spokes. Also an 11-28 is a pretty tight ratio for 11 speed cassettes. Basically, its an 11-25 with the 28t icing on the cake

***Shafty. Its stainless so it shouldn’t fatigue from the likely 40nm torque spec that spreads the pressure out in a circle. Its already sorta in tube form anyway.

I wish this were chrome steel though. It would be a bit heavier but last quite a bit longer. Stainless and Ti wear out faster than chromoly when it comes to marring forces

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
7 years ago

That said..most wheels can be adapted with a file. A SRAM RED22 cassette probably won’t work for this because the back is flat but a cheaper SRAM cassette and any Shimano cassette will work. Its a one time fix and way cheaper than buying these over and over again.

I’ve done this with 2 Shimano hubs, a DT hub, Zipp Hub a cheapo knockoff for a friend and soon a HOPE hub. This is still a great solution if you don’t mind spending money and are afraid of screwing up your freehub bodies

KTS
KTS
7 years ago

I more or less did the same thing by milling .060″ out of the back of a sram 1170 cassette since the last 3 gears are pinned onto one spline. It worked just fine for a season of racing.

Big Willy Wonka
Big Willy Wonka
7 years ago

^ You sure about all that, Veganpotter?

That’s some pretty fuzzy Materials Science and warranty voiding right there

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
7 years ago

Big Willy Wonka. It will surely void a warranty but all the wheels I did this to are past their warranty period. My DT wheel now has close to 10,000miles on it and is on its second 11spd cassette.

***I also have a degree in metalsmithing. Not quite a materials engineer but I’ve got a decent understanding

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
7 years ago

Also…it’s not like engineers don’t make products that don’t fail all the time anyway. They’re constantly playing with what they think they can get away with when it comes to lightweight, high performance equipment. Hence…the 3 1st Gen 10speed SRAM RED cassettes that fell apart on me when the glue holding the backplate came off.

pdxfixed
pdxfixed
7 years ago

Just a heads up, you can get these things shipped direct from Edco for about $224, and they have sizes up to an 11-32.

JasonK
JasonK
7 years ago

Veganpotter, I’m not sure what you’re on about regarding materials. You say you wish the cassette were “chrome steel” because it would be heavier but more durable. I assume you mean 4130 or a similar alloy (commonly called “chrome-moly”). The thing is, this *is* made from chrome-moly. At least that’s what it says in the article.

Furthermore, all steels are pretty much the same density (~7.85g/cc) and have pretty much the same stiffness. (Hardness is wildly different, though).

Then you point out that stainless and Ti wear out faster than chrome-moly. That’s true–there’s that hardness–but again, this *is* chrome-moly–and a heat-treated (hardened) variety at that!

So what on earth are you trying to say about the material here?

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
7 years ago

Yes, stiffness and hardness are very different animals. Aluminum is plenty stiff but doesn’t have good marring properties.

Sorry I missed the chromoly. This is better than stainless and a hair lighter. Tool steel would be heavier and possibly wear better if treated properly(similar to the cheaper SRAAM X01 Cassette). Of course treated chromoly can vary greatly, and really crappy tool steel can also just crack easily with the right force

salsarider79
salsarider79
7 years ago

James S: With regard to fitting an 11spd cassette, the freehub body is usually 1mm different. This also means that if you fit a new freehub body (many older wheels now have 11spd freehub body aftermarket options) you may need to re dish the wheel too…what is that about one step forward and two steps back….?

Bob
Bob
7 years ago

salsarider – you can only re-dish the wheel if you also replace the axle. For instance, the White Ind. 11 speed conversion kit for their older road hubs comes with a freehub body and axle.

thesteve4761
thesteve4761
7 years ago

@Bob- not true. The DT 11spd Conversion requires re-dishing, and does not replace the axle.