Home > Bike Types > Road Bike

Fulcrum adds Speed 40 Clincher to the collection, non-tubular sees similar tech – Updated pricing & availability

8
Support us! Bikerumor may earn a small commission from affiliate links in this article. Learn More

2017-Fulcrum-Speed-40-Clincher-carbon-fiber-road-bike-wheels

There doesn’t seem to be any debate to the merit of tubulars on the pro tour. They’re lighter and offer a better ride but the pros also have pro mechanics. For most of us, that isn’t the case. That’s the argument Fulcrum is making for the launch of their newest clincher, the Speed 40. The wheel includes much of the tech found in the tubular version of the wheel, but in a clincher version for the every day rider. According to Fulcrum this is every bit of a high end wheel, just with tires that are a little easier to mount…

2017_SPEED40Crosso-ANTfront

A big part of what makes this wheel possible is what Fulcrum refers to as their MoMag construction. The process of laying up and molding the carbon fiber into the final rim shape results in a wheel that comes out of the mold without any need for drilling out spoke holes and with a solid tire bed. Fulcrum says that drilling into the carbon to create spoke holes after the fact would weaken the structure and their MoMag tech results in a stronger rim. The rim construction also includes their 3Diamant braking surface for improved wed ant dry braking and a 3k carbon finish. The rims are not certified tubeless compatible, but with a sealed rim bed we wouldn’t be surprised to see people try to make a conversion work.

2017-Fulcrum-Speed-40-Clincher-carbon-fiber-road-bike-wheels4 2017-Fulcrum-Speed-40-Clincher-carbon-fiber-road-bike-wheels3

2017-Fulcrum-Speed-40-Clincher-carbon-fiber-road-bike-wheels2

Measuring 40mm tall and 24.2mm ext/17mm int., the rim is laced to a smaller 28mm carbon front hub that is lighter and more aero, with an aluminum rear hub both with USB cup and cone bearings. Spoke lacing is radial for the front and their Two to One 7/14 spoke pattern for the rear with spokes threading into DRSC nipples which supposedly spread the stress of the spoke over a wider area. Weights are a claimed 621g F/799g R for a total 1420g weight. Wheels will be available in either black or red, and pricing is TBA.

The new Speed 40C wheels are now available in mid October 2016, and will retail for 1922€.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

8 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Veganpotter
Veganpotter
6 years ago

As always, well behind the times. 17mm internal width? That’s worse than Mavic’s “new, up to date rims”. I wouldn’t care so much if these were cheap pieces of junk instead of expensive pieces junk.

Greg
Greg
6 years ago

Enve SES 3.4 rims are 18.5mm and 16.5mm wide, front and rear, respectively. I’d say these are reasonably current.

Charlie
Charlie
6 years ago

Mavic and Campa/Fulcrum rely on the “European Tyre and Rim Technical Organisation” (ERTRO), which states 17mm rims as a minimum for 25mm tires (13mm for 18mm tires, 15mm for 23mm, 19mm for 28mm). Wider is possible, but a tire that goes easily ON the rim (which is the case for e.g. 25mm tire on a 19mm rim) will also easily go OFF when loosing air. It’s just for safety reasons. Zipp also stays with 17mm except for the Zipp 30 Course intended for Cyclo-Cross with ~32mm tires.

Marin
Marin
6 years ago
Reply to  Charlie

What does width have to do with how easy or hard it is to put or take off the tire?
MTB has been using wide rims for some time now but I wouldn’t say road rims are narrow considering relation between rim and tire.
25mm tire that is defacto standard for road tires on 17mm rim has much smaller tire to rim factor than what we consider very wide and modern 30mm rim for MTB with 2.35 (61mm) tires.

Charlie
Charlie
6 years ago
Reply to  Marin

http://engineerstalk.mavic.com/the-right-tyre-width-on-the-right-rim-width/

Tyre width and rim width have to be made for each other.

If the tyre is too wide relative to the rim width, it will not be well supported by the rim and the ride may feel flimsy. There is also a higher chance of pinch flats.

Equally, if the tyre is too narrow relative to the rim width, it will get a flat shape that is bad for rolling efficiency and ride feel. For a MTB tyre this can result in the side knobs constantly coming in contact with the ground even in a straight line. The tyre will not deform as it is supposed to and the grip and rolling efficiency is no longer guaranteed.

But most importantly, there is a safety issue.

Some tests performed by several tyre manufacturers, including Mavic, have shown that a narrow tyre on a wide rim has a higher chance of severely coming off the rim.

Danno
Danno
6 years ago

Steel spokes, thank you

matthew moseley
matthew moseley
6 years ago

have these in a campy bora 35 version (in tub) – amazing amazing wheels. really durable. smooth hubs. stiff. all that.

Rivak Hoffman
5 years ago

have been riding and racing in these for over 1 year now. No issues. faster than my Campy Ultra Bora 50s and Enve 3.4SES. Nothing more annoying than negative comments from those who don’t own them.

Subscribe Now

Sign up to receive BikeRumor content direct to your inbox.

Subscribe Now

Sign up to receive BikeRumor content direct to your inbox.