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A Full Suspension Electric Mountain Bike for Kids? The Rocky Mountain Reaper Powerplay is Here

RMB Reaper Powerplay, boy jumping
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It was just a matter of time, but younger trail riders now have the option of going electric thanks to Rocky Mountain Bikes. RMB says their new Reaper Powerplay is the first mid-motor, full-suspension eMTB specifically designed for kids.

An all-new Dyname S4 Mini motor and drive system is the heart of the Reaper Powerplay. Add to that dropper posts, hydraulic disc brakes, and some kid-sized components, and you’ve got a fully legit trail eMTB for your upcoming shredder. Furthermore, the smaller wheeled 24” model adapts to 26” wheels so it can grow with your grom.

Rocky Mountain Reaper Powerplay:

RMB Reaper Powerplay, angle, forest

The Reaper Powerplay features a FORM alloy frame with 130mms of rear travel driven by RMB’s mid-high pivot Smoothlink linkage. The frame is the same for the 24” and 26” wheeled models, but RMB has a few tricks up their sleeve to make it work with either wheel size.

The Reapers get RockShox Deluxe Select rear shocks, and Manitou JUNIT 34 forks. The 26” bike gets the JUNIT Expert model with 140mm travel, and the 24” bike gets the Comp model with 120mm (please note the Manitou forks are not shown in the photos).

RMB includes a version of their ‘Ride’ chip on the Reaper Powerplay, but in this case, it’s a Ride 2 flip-chip. Flipping the chip optimizes the frame for 24” or 26” wheels, so the 24” model can accept the larger wheels and fit your growing kid for longer.

RMB Reaper Powerplay, chainstay flip chip

To adapt the Reaper Powerplay for both wheel sizes, there is also a flip-chip in the chainstay. That does mean the 26” bike must be run in its Long setting, but the chainstay length can be adjusted on the 24” bike between its Short and Long positions. The frames are SRAM UDH compatible in Long mode only.

RMB Reaper Powerplay, adjustable headset

The third adaptation to fit both wheel sizes is an adjustable reach headset. The 24” Reaper Powerplay comes with -5mm headset cups installed, and the 26” version comes with +5mm cups. The longer reach is necessary to fit a 26” wheel up front so the reach adjustment isn’t there as a preference option, it just makes it possible to run both wheel sizes. The +5mm cups will be available to order so you can grow the 24” Reaper into a 26”.

Powertrain:

RMB Reaper Powerplay, Dyname S4 mini motor

Rocky Mountain went to Dyname to develop an all-new S4 Mini motor, which was made specifically for the Reaper Powerplay. The S4 Mini motor puts out 40Nm of torque and 300W peak power (250W nominal). A torque sensor ensures smooth power delivery.

Just like the adult Powerplay eMTBs, the Reaper Powerplays offer four assist levels – Eco, Trail, Trail+, and Ludicrous. They also include the ability to fine-tune the drive system with two rider profiles that offer adjustable boost and assistance levels.

One key feature for this grom-specific eMTB is the motor’s ‘kid mode’. This mode allows parents to limit the power output and the pedal assist’s top speed.

RMB Reaper Powerplay, mini remote

RMB’s Micro Remote handlebar-mounted controller allows for easy assist level changes, and access to the various info screens and configuration menus.

RMB Reaper Powerplay, jumbotron

The Jumbotron display screen in the Reaper Powerplay’s top tube shows your key ride stats, and includes the bike’s power button.  

RMB Reaper Powerplay, girl pedalling

Power is supplied by an internal 240Wh battery. A 2A charger is included with the bike.

Geometry:

RMB Reaper Powerplay, geo chart

Some of the Reaper Powerplay’s key angles are very similar to adult bikes. They offer slack, up-to-date head tube angles; The 26” version is 64°, and the 24” bike is 65.7°. For efficient pedaling, seat tube angles are steep at 76.5° (26”) and 78.3° (24”).

Check out the above chart for the complete geometry of both models.

Build Notes:

RMB Reaper Powerplay, handlebars

Of course, Rocky Mountain made sure there were several kid-sized components on the Reaper Powerplays. First off, they come with 640mm wide RMB handlebars, with a 31.8mm clamp and 19mm diameter to accommodate junior-sized grips.

The Tektro hydraulic disc brakes feature short reach levers, and the bikes run 180mm rotors. RMB made sure the cranks were appropriate for young rippers, stocking 155mm arms on the 26” bike, and 140mm on the 24” model. The Dyname motor also allows Rocky Mountain to run two-piece cranks in the Reaper Powerplays, instead of the three-piece cranks some motors require.

The kids also get dropper posts! The 26” Reaper Powerplay offers an X-Fusion Manic 125mm dropper, and the 24” version runs a shorter 80mm version.

RMB Reaper Powerplay, CUES derailleur

A few components that are not kid-specific include a Shimano CUES 10-speed drivetrain with an 11-48t cassette, and WTB KOM Team rims wrapped with Maxxis Minion tires.

Model Lineup:

The Reaper Powerplay will be available in one model for each wheel size. They are only available in the colorways shown.

RMB Reaper Powerplay 26", side

Reaper Powerplay 26 – $4,769

RMB Reaper Powerplay 24", side

Reaper Powerplay 24 – $4,399

RMB Reaper Powerplay, mom and kid
Images c. Rocky Mountain Bikes

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16 Comments
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King County
King County
9 days ago

I don’t want to jump the gun here, because a bike like this may become ‘the norm’. Pros: A kid with a minor disabilty can do mtb, or a kid can keep up with Dad offroad, etc. Con: There are better ways to get kids outside and away from electronics.

TheStansMonster
TheStansMonster
9 days ago
Reply to  King County

Another con: a lot of trails are off limits to ebikes, so why limit what trails a kid can access for essentially no good reason?

blue
blue
9 days ago

Like… seriously? Teaching the kids from their young age not to work hard for some success and fun?

craig
9 days ago
Reply to  blue

c’mon blue; it’s the American way.

Big Mike
Big Mike
9 days ago
Reply to  craig

or Canadian in this case, craig

Rob22826545
Rob22826545
9 days ago
Reply to  blue

Time for bed Grandad

Tomi
Tomi
9 days ago
Reply to  blue

Just buy him them a ps5 if all you want are lazy kids.

alex cogger
9 days ago

RMB Product guy / dad of the 1st test pilot here. As one of the only ppl in the world who has actually ridden with his kid on this bike, happy to reply to any *reasonable* questions here.

Jahbikes
Jahbikes
9 days ago
Reply to  alex cogger

I personally think it’s a great way to ride more miles with your kid. I would have done ANYTHING for more trail time with my kid when she was younger. Also, my wife is 4’8″ and get’s my kids old bikes, sooo….

alex cogger
9 days ago
Reply to  Jahbikes

Single biggest motivator.

Rusty Shackleford
Rusty Shackleford
9 days ago

Most kids don’t need this, but I do see some youngsters here in Colorado struggling on “climbs.” From an adult perspective, these are sharp little bumps that take 15-30 seconds, but proper hard for a kid.

Though 250w seems like too much.

Alex cogger
9 days ago

Absolutely. In low lying areas may not be as needed, but anywhere with significant elevation change (like North Van winch & plummet style) it’s transformational. And while 300W seems like a lot, bear in mind that is PEAK power, not continuous. You can soft pedal to your heart’s content. Further, a parent can limit output (0-100% of available power), top speed (up to legal limit for class 1) and customize the motor mapping to change assist levels and torque sensor… sensitivity.

Weirdly… my kid insists on Ludicrous Mode, Max sensitivity always. So yeah. There is that. Roughly equivalent to me at Trail mode (2 of 4) with normal torque sensitivity.

nooner
nooner
8 days ago

That is all we need, more lazy kids on ebikes.

teddy
teddy
8 days ago

I live in a rugged Caribbean island with epic mountain biking, but the slopes can be way too much for my 7 year old (15-20%). Most of the trails are a descent from a long (20 min) climb. I struggle with the idea of getting an e-bike for my daughter for her to come along. She really wants to but would have to walk about a 75 minutes uphill with her bike to even start the trail. Maybe it is nature’s way of saying sometimes you just need to be a bit older and stronger. But, man, I would love for her to join me! $4500 for a kids bike is a bit of an abstract concept, but you only have these moments once and then you blink and she’s pushing me around in my wheelchair.

Johnbee
Johnbee
8 days ago

Lack of a motor nevers stopped my son and me having great mountain bike full days together from an early age. And he was proud of the effort he had to put into his achievements. A lesson for life in general.

Jose
Jose
2 days ago

I think the mistake is to compare this to an analog bike experience for kids. Currently, kids are doing all kinds of motor sports, this includes kids on gas motorcycles and on the street with ebikes. I think this is a positive experience more than anything and any kids should be so lucky to get one.

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