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Garmin Edge 1050 Has Waze-Like Reporting, Training but Less Battery

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It’s been nearly two years since the last “big screen” Garmin launch, and it seems to have been worth the wait. The all-new Garmin Edge 1050 wants to change how cyclists view and use their head units. Garmin claims the new Edge 1050 is its brightest, most intelligent, and most connected cycling computer ever.

Garmin Edge 1050 cycling computer group ride
All Images: Garmin

What is the Garmin Edge 1050?

The Edge 1050 is the new flagship cycling computer from Garmin. It boasts an ultra-vibrant Liquid Crystal touchscreen display and provides more real-time feedback than any computer on the market. Are riders ready for all the real time feed-back and communication on rides?

What kind of real-time feedback are we talking about? The Edge 1050 has updated navigation, performance tracking, cycling awareness, and intelligent connectivity.

Wouldn’t that drain the battery? Yes, but the new unit has a claimed battery life of up to 20 hours in the most demanding use cases and up to 60 hours in the battery-saver mode. That’s not too bad, considering it acts like a smartphone. However, riders looking for an ultra-distance computer might need to stick to the Edge 1040 Solar or wait until an Edge 1050 Solar option becomes available.

Like Waze For Cycling 

The new Edge 1050 also has cycling community features. It’s like an onboard road map that can direct and re-direct you when things go wrong or a “Cyclist Waze.” The unit can compile reports of road hazard alerts tagged by fellow cyclists. Reports can be as simple as a roadside pothole or a downed tree. To help with communication (if you choose), riders can also see in-ride messaging and leaderboards during group rides. 

Early Edge users, don’t worry, the Garmin Connect App will soon be updated. GroupRide updates and road hazard alerts will be available on Edge 540, Edge 840, and Edge 1040 series cycling computers.

Other features include additions like on-device course creation, Garmin Pay™, a built-in speaker, and more to help improve every ride.

Make Group Rides More Exciting 

Suppose you’re looking to make your weekend hammer ride more exciting. Riders can add more competition to their ride with in-ride leaderboards for climbs, plus “you name it” post-ride awards, including Speed Racer (highest max speed), Chatterbox (most heavily using the GroupRide messaging feature), Worker Bee (most time spent pedaling), and more.

Plus Added Safety 

In-ride messaging and live locations can help if someone on your ride has an incident. When incident detection is enabled, alerts can notify and route fellow riders to a rider needing help. 

“We are excited to introduce our most capable, high-performing bike computer yet with the Edge 1050. Delivering an exceptional in-ride experience, superior navigation, and community-focused features, our latest cycling computer is made to keep cyclists motivated—whether they’re planning a group ride with friends or a long, solo adventure.”

– Dan Bartel, Garmin Vice President of Global Consumer Sales

Now, With Added Training Tools 

Like other Garmin units, the new Edge 1050 has training tools. Free Garmin training plans—like event-adaptive training plans—deliver personalized workouts that adapt based on performance and recovery, while daily suggested workouts provide ride suggestions based on a cyclist’s current training load and Garmin estimated VO2 max.

Stamina Insights 

Edge 1050 includes real-time stamina insights that can help riders closely monitor and track their exertion levels. These insights are based on the rider’s current fitness, estimated VO2, and time above FTP. Meanwhile, Power Guide now considers wind data and a cyclist’s current stamina to make real-time adjustments to power targets.

Improved Climb Pro 

An updated ClimbPro lets riders see the remaining ascent and grade for each climb—whether riding a course or not. The feature is one of my personal favorites and helps riders pace climbs correctly without blowing up. All new Garmin advanced cycling dynamics can provide riders with insights into their performance, and mountain bike metrics, including jump count, jump distance, and Garmin specific features like Grit®, and Flow™.

Varia and LifeTrack Enabled 

If you’re concerned about safety, you probably know the Garmin Varia or the Trek Carback radar. The Edge 1050 includes safety features like LiveTrack and incident detection and is compatible with the Varia™ line of cycling radars and intelligent lights. The unit is also paired with inReach® satellite communicators. 

The all-new Garmin Edge 1050 cycling computer in action.

Garmin Edge 1050 Key Features 

  • Refreshed Design: The angled casing, discrete, all-metal buttons, and a replaceable quarter-turn mount are complemented by a vivid 3.5″ liquid crystal display.
  • Garmin Pay Contactless Payments: Don’t worry about digging into your pocket to pull cash; breeze through mid-ride café or snack stops with a tap of the Edge.
  • Built-In Speaker: Use an on-device bike bell to record workout and navigation prompts and alert riders and pedestrians ahead.
  • On-Device Course Creator: Easily create courses on the device using the responsive touchscreen and toggle different map overlays on or off.
  • Surface Type: On the Edge, you can see paved or unpaved roadways while riding and get alerts for upcoming unpaved sections.
  • Ride-Specific Routing: Get routing suited to a specific ride—mountain, gravel, or road.
  • Map Manager with Wi-Fi® Connectivity: You can add, swap, or update additional maps via Wi-Fi® right on the cycling computer.
  • Available: Now 
  • Price of $699.99

Garmin.com 

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16 Comments
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Deputy Dawg
Deputy Dawg
24 days ago

How about Trailforks compatibility? I’ve got the the older 1050 and the TF map display is SO poor compared to a smartphone, and TF/Garmin only seem to do updates infrequently so new trails don’t always show up in a very timely manner.

MountainBiker
MountainBiker
24 days ago
Reply to  Deputy Dawg

At least on the 820 I have you have to connect it to a computer to get the Trail Forks map updates, it doesn’t do it through your phone, so you have to remember to do it from time to time, I see fairly frequent updates on that though.

Daniel
Daniel
24 days ago

We are at the brink of convergence of cycling computers and smartphones – at least pricewise. Hardware-wise the cycling computer lag and lack severely. At this point a mediocre cycling app would eclipse a high-end cycling computer.

Ken Palagyi
Ken Palagyi
24 days ago
Reply to  Daniel

Agreed but I don’t want my huge phone on my bars. So, I’ll be using a computer.

nooner
nooner
24 days ago
Reply to  Ken Palagyi

Run the Edge 130 plus like Nino and me

Daniel
Daniel
21 days ago
Reply to  nooner

I have an Edge 530 in use. Bought it four years ago for 230€ and that is incidentally the current listing price. The 540 has got some additional features, that could (IMO) easily be made available for the 530, but I guess, then there would be no point of offering a 540.
To me it feels like the people doing the software development for the cycling computers either don’t use their products or are not allowed to change features some pencil pusher decided on.
It feels like the 2006 smartphone market and I hope there will be an iphone like revolution for the cycling computer market – better sooner than later.

Lucas Milometer
Lucas Milometer
24 days ago
Reply to  Daniel

Karoo was the android cycle/phone convergence,
then dropped the LTE capability.

I figure the Garmin 1090, to be released 2032
will have a feature list 65 pages long.
The DC Rainmaker review will be a 6 hour epic.

Chase
Chase
24 days ago
Reply to  Daniel

The app Cadence is pretty great but would eat thru the battery on my Iphone 12 fast. For a 1 or 2 hour ride If I charged before Id be alright but if its going to be longer I would need to have a external battery to charge my phone. At that point I thought i might as well just get a bike computer and not worry about it.

Speed565
Speed565
24 days ago
Reply to  Daniel

It’s less about the hardware. This is cheap. The software is what matters and what is the most expensive. In your phone witch apps can run without internet connection? Without sending data to the cloud? Here you get hardware along with offline software like maps.

Daniel
Daniel
21 days ago
Reply to  Speed565

Garmin know exactly the hardware specs of their devices yet they manage to occationally brick them.
The Garmin Connect app on the smartphone is completely runner centric and limited for cycling use. To make full use of current gen Edge series you need to use the Computer and smartphone app, because the web based Garmin Conect mostly for data display.

A good offline app on my smartphone is mapy(.cz). Free offline maps world wide, with offline search, offline (re)routing, route planning, marked trails, easy tour planning (just select type of riding and a tour time and watch the magic happen). It even offers kayaking routes and shows ski slopes with difficulty rating. You can search for shops, gas stations, train stations, bus stops show schedules, wells with drinkable water are displayed, you can book accommodations from the app (obviously not an offline feature), you can record your rides, …
All I’m missing is the ability to connect sensors (powermeter, Sram AXS and maybe a speedometer) and some statistical analysis or the option to export rides to strava and the likes.

Exodux
24 days ago

Realistically, how long will these last while fully in the navigation screen? I did a ride a month ago in unfamiliar terrain , where I had to use navigation the whole time and after about 5 hours, the battery died. Granted I was using the Explore model which said it had a twelve hour battery.
Most of time this unit works great, this time I got lost and had to self navigate back to my starting location.

mathijs
mathijs
24 days ago
Reply to  Exodux

I am just back from a bikepacking trip with my 1040. I only charged it once in 5 days. I did long days (9am-5pm) all with maps + 6 data fields via CiQ app. 2 sensors paired and had I think I sometimes stated when fully charged it had 40 hours battery life, independent of maps mode or not. So, if you like batterytime, the 1040 is a great pick.

fitness
fitness
24 days ago
Reply to  mathijs

I’ve had similar battery success with 1040, great unit! Rarely needs to be charged

Krisztian Papdi
Krisztian Papdi
21 days ago

Hi,
But still the small direction triangle on the display. I have a 1030+ with the same “-” point. It seems that Garmin has not learned anything from the many posts, critics, reviews and from other manufacturers, and as far as I can see, it will not. It’s definitely the end of everything.
Shame about Garmin.

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