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Goodyear Bicycle Tires floats new tubeless sealant in single serve bottle

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To go along with their newly released tire line, Goodyear’s bicycle brand is adding their own tubeless tire sealant. Meant to perfectly complement their Tubeless Complete tires, the sealant should also work in other tires and adds yet another option for the consumer.

Designed to work in an extreme range of temperatures, Goodyear claims the sealant will work all the way down to -30°F. If that’s true, it should be a good option for fat bikers or anyone who rides in the winter. It also claims to seal punctures up to 6mm wide.

Packaged in a 150ml bottle, the application bottle is single-serve for a set of wheels – if you’re running 29.2.6″ tires. Goodyear carefully chose the 150ml sized bottle to be able to claim it’s a single serve bottle for nearly all standard tires. While it will only cover two large 29er tires, it will fill up to four 700 x 25mm road bike tires. According to Goodyear, they feel that since every tire sealant has a limited life span, packaging it in smaller bottles makes sense and will lead to less waste. Goodyear’s sealant has a shelf life of 18 months when sealed, and up to seven months of “optimum operating effectiveness.”

Retailers will purchase the sealant in boxes of 12, and each bottle will sell to consumers for $9.95.

goodyearbike.com

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15 Comments
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Yerma
Yerma
4 years ago

Great. One use and more plastic trash.

***
***
4 years ago
Reply to  Yerma

Recycle the bottle. Better than waisting a 500ml bottle

Dylan
Dylan
4 years ago
Reply to  Yerma

Plus there’s the ‘convenience’ of having to either buy the sealant more frequently or have a bunch of small bottles sitting around. I would much rather buy a 1L bottle every couple of years and always have some on hand to slosh in for a top up. Not had a problem with Stans or Joes going off.

Crash Bandicoot
Crash Bandicoot
4 years ago
Reply to  Dylan

The bottle size isn’t necessarily aimed at you the consumer the idea is to increase frequency of visits to the bike shop for sealant. I don’t know too many riders who go to the bike shop for one thing and don’t leave with other stuff. It’s also a good add-on item at a price point that’s attractive for that purpose e.g. “picking up some tubes for my road bike ohh I think I might need sealant lets add that its only 12 bucks less than two artisanal latte’s”.

I’ll stick with my 1L bottle of stans but it’s not a terrible idea especially since I’m more likely going to think more strategically think of my bulk purchases and buy them online.

Crash Bandicoot
Crash Bandicoot
4 years ago

Is this a latex based sealant? e.g. one that works

Trucknutz
Trucknutz
4 years ago

Yup…latex based

John
John
4 years ago

It’ll look fantastic as it weeps through the sidewalls.

Crash Bandicoot
Crash Bandicoot
4 years ago
Reply to  John

Is this really an issue with latex based sealants? I know some tires weep more than others but I’ve never had an issue with Stans on S-Works tires which bleed like crazy.

Antoine
Antoine
4 years ago

10$ for 150ml, that’s crazy, people don’t get how much sealant you need to keep your tubeless setup running all year long. That’s is barely enough for 2 average mtb tire. If some sealant is lost in the first sealing it might not be enough. 1.5 month later you’re toasted. With my 2 tubeless bike (1 road, 1 mtb) i use a bit more than 1l a year.

Steve
Steve
4 years ago
Reply to  Antoine

$10 for 150ml is pretty par for the course.

JNH
JNH
4 years ago
Reply to  Steve

But when a 1L bottle of Stans is $30 it comes across as pretty stingy.

Bmx
Bmx
4 years ago

I claim bollox on that sealant going off thing. My orange seal is fine for months in a big shop bottle. Although I suppose its sealed as in the cap is screwed on.

Dylan
Dylan
4 years ago
Reply to  Bmx

Yeah, the argument doesn’t hold water. On the one hand, a small volume of the sealant is supposed to last for months in your tire, where it’s being vigorously mixed with a large volume oxygen at double the atmospheric partial pressure. On the other hand, a much larger volume of sealant in a bottle containing a relatively small volume of air, undergoing no mixing, is supposed to go off before you use it.

Mark Visser
Mark Visser
4 years ago

I refuse to purchase anything from Goodyear after reading about their G159 tire.

https://jalopnik.com/goodyear-knew-of-dangerous-rv-tire-failures-for-over-20-1824997252

Proves that there are no lower limits when it comes to corporate profits.

Mark Visser
Mark Visser
4 years ago

I refuse to purchase any Goodyear product after finding out about their G159 RV tires.

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