It may have taken a while, but the final piece of our XTR puzzle has finally arrived. If you’ve been following along, Shimano initially shipped out their early XTR M9100 groups with a non-series crankset to speed up delivery. This MT900 crank borrowed a lot from existing Hollowtech II cranksets, but included the new direct mount chainrings that are 12 speed compatible.

Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weightsCrankset

And while the MT900 crankset was an excellent temporary replacement due to its stealth appearance and bargain price tag, Shimano is now shipping the original M9100 crankset making the full group available for purchase. Coincidentally, we also just received our full XT test group which we’ll dig into very soon. Shown above is the FC-M9120-1 crankset which is meant for Enduro riding, while the FC-M9100-1 is meant for XC racing (q-factor  being the main difference between the two at 162mm vs 168mm).

Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights

One of the biggest design changes for the crank is the move to a preload adjustment system that sits inside of the left crankarm. You install the crank by fully tightening the 8mm crank bolt to 45-55Nm and then remove any play by turning the adjustment nut by hand. It’s important to note that certain cranks use different spacer configurations – the FC-M9120-1 uses an included spacer between the left crank arm and the bottom bracket.

Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights

With all the included hardware, the cranks measure 472g in a 170mm length without a chainring.

Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights

The direct mount chainring are offered in 30, 32, 34, 36, and 38t configurations, all meant for the new 12 speed Shimano chains.

Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights

Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights

The mounting spline is keyed so you can only install the chainring in one orientation, and you’ll need the TL-FC41 FC installation tool to tighten the lockring. For XTR, this tool was included in the box with the crank.

Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights

Our 32t ring checked in at 70g.

Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights

Bottom Bracket

Note that you’ll also need a new adapter in order to install the SM-BB93 bottom bracket. Since the cups are physically smaller, they won’t fit the existing Hollowtech BB tools. The adapter ring slips over the BB shell, and then allows you to use your existing TL-FC32 or TL-FC37 tools to install the cups.

Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights

The threaded BB checks in at 64g.

Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights

If you prefer the look or the price of the MT900 crankset, you’re looking at 595g for a 170mm crank with a 32t chainring. So the higher end M9120 crank will save you 53g.

Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights

Cassette

Out back, the massive 10-51t CS-M9100-12 cassette weighs in at 368g. The 10-51t cassette has a 10-12-14-16-18-21-24-28-33-39-45-51T progression with five titanium cogs, 3 aluminum cogs, and four steel cogs.

Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights

Chain

You’ll need a Shimano XTR CN-M9100 12 speed chain if you want to take full advantage of the Hyperglide+ shifting (trust us, you do). This full length chain with a little packaging and master link checks in at 271g.

Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights

Derailleur

Running that chain through the gears is the massive RD-M9100-SGS which is needed for the 51t cassettes. This is the long cage version, the short cage GS only clears up to a 45t cog. 242g for this derailleur.

Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights

Shifter

Controlling that derailleur up front is the SL-M9100-IR shift lever which in this case is the I-Spec EV mount. The shifter includes multi-release, instant release, and 2-way release functions and will allow for up to four shifts at a time with the main lever. The shifter comes in at 126g with a polymer coated stainless steel shift cable, and the full length OT-SP41 housing adds another 59g.

Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights

Brakes

To use the I-Spec EV shifter mount, you’ll need compatible brakes like the BR-M9120/BL-M9120. These are the four piston trail/enduro brakes which include pads with radiator fins in either resin or metal, ceramic pistons, and ti hardware. The brakes weigh in at 292g and 278g based on the hose lengths.

Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights

Shimano of course recommends those brakes to be used with the RT-MT900 Freez Ice Tech rotors. These come in 140, 160, 180, and 203mm sizes, with the 180 measuring 129g and the 203 measuring 148g.

Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights

Hubs

To go along with the group, Shimano sent over their revised XTR hubs which lost their Scylence feature – though they’re still nearly silent. These are impressively light at 144g for the front and 245g for the rear hub in Boost 110/148mm sizes.

Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights

Dropper lever

There’s also a new SL-MT800-IL dropper seat post lever which is a scant 37g. The lever seems to offer excellent ergonomics and adjustment. Unfortunately ours shipped without the I-Spec EV mounting post, which also wasn’t included with the front brake lever. So if you’re planning on running this, make sure you sort that out ahead of time.

Hands On: Complete Shimano XTR M9100 1 x 12 group with actual weights

With the exception of the new crankset, we’ve been racking up the miles on the new group on one exceptional build. More on that dream bike very soon…

shimano.com

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22 Comments
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Dolan Halbrook
Dolan Halbrook
2 years ago

Now we just need those 3rd party MicroSpline cassette bodies….

Maciej Pike-Biegunski
Maciej Pike-Biegunski
2 years ago
Reply to  Dolan Halbrook

Onyx, DT and I9 already have them. And they’re the most reliable hub manufacturers.

Shafty
Shafty
2 years ago

Don’t forget White Industries. Also, the Shimano hubs are sweet. The finish on the XTR hubs is great as always.

Kris
Kris
2 years ago

I won’t be converting till Chris King has a micro spline freehub. Fully serviceable and adjustable hubs and bearings are more important to me then running 12 spd

Gummee!
Gummee!
2 years ago
Reply to  Kris

Ummm… if you’re talking serviceable, there’s nothing easier than Shimano hubs. Couple of cone wrenches and some grease and you’re good to go.

Speed565
Speed565
2 years ago

Most of us are having wheels at a price of rear hub of this companies. I9 101 $289, I9 Hydra $435, Onyx $470.
We need MicroSpline cassette bodies for affordable hubs which 70% of us use (like Novatec).

onrhodes
2 years ago
Reply to  Speed565

I think they call those Shimano SLX ($85) and XT ($101) at Universal Cycles.

Dolan Halbrook
Dolan Halbrook
2 years ago
Reply to  onrhodes

Fair enough, bu cassette bodies are still (generally) cheaper, and more importantly, don’t require a wheel rebuild.

Javier
Javier
2 years ago

I9 RELIABLE? bearing are crap, seals are crap and anodizing went off after 1 year

Matt
Matt
2 years ago
Reply to  Javier

The bearings are great, the seals work fine, ano doesn’t fade unless you clean it with harsh cleaners…. You people are so ridiculous

Javier
Javier
2 years ago
Reply to  Matt

Yeah sure…

Peter
Peter
2 years ago
Reply to  Javier

@javier, what are you talking about? i have 3 wheelsets with I9 torch hubs. all with multiple seasons. ive had the bearings last 2 years minimum, seals are fine, and no issues at all with anodizing. i dont work for I9, but their hubs are excellent, and i think worth the money.

javier
javier
2 years ago
Reply to  Peter

You´re lucky

Dolan Halbrook
Dolan Halbrook
2 years ago

That’s nice, but I’m not going to rebuild my Stan’s Valor rear wheel just to have MicroSpline. Better if I could just replace the driver.

m
m
2 years ago

the bb is nothing new. Shimano has been doing this with XTR/DA, Ultegra/XT and even lower for 2 years plus

trundle rocks
trundle rocks
2 years ago

And no 180mm crank length…. 🙁 Giant unhappy face.

blahblahblah
blahblahblah
2 years ago

those hubs are gorgeous

Joe Murray
Joe Murray
2 years ago

Significant feature missed here on the cranks is Hollow Bonded Construction that was available only on the M9000 left side arm (M9020 was Hollowtech II) and is now on both sides. I don’t think it’s called Holowtech II anymore because it’s not the same construction anymore.

RobertW
RobertW
2 years ago
Reply to  Joe Murray

Hollow Bonded, which is the same as the last two gen Ultegra and DA cranks that keep falling apart? I just handled one R8100 in the lbs yesterday that was going back to Shimano.

Rob
Rob
2 years ago

Love the look of XTR cranks, the weight is impressively heavy compared to the SRAM, 200g is a lot.

RobertW
RobertW
2 years ago
Reply to  Rob

SRAM’s lightest crankset the X01 is 60g lighter with ring. Lightest is the RF Next SL at 446g.

Matthew
Matthew
2 years ago

So if you need a special tool for the smaller BB, are the bearings smaller?