Jagwire attracts mechanics with new dual magnetic Pro Internal Routing Tool

Jagwire pro internal wire housing cable routing tool magnet

Depending on the frame, internal routing can be a nightmare. Sure, once it’s installed it looks clean and can keep the cables sheltered from dirt and the wind, but often installation can be frustrating to say the least. Best case, you’re pushing a piece of cable or housing through a full tube inside the frame. Worst case?  You find yourself trying to coax a stubborn cable or housing through a hole at an impossible angle, completely blind.

Jag wire certainly isn’t the first company to devise a magnetic internal routing tool, but after seeing their new Pro Internal Routing tool in person, it will probably be in high demand once available…

Jagwire pro internal wire housing cable routing tool magnet-4 Jagwire pro internal wire housing cable routing tool magnet-3

Jagwire pro internal wire housing cable routing tool magnet-2

A relatively simple tool, the Pro Internal Routing tool is basically a wand with two different magnets. On one end you have a super power, large magnet perfect for using through the frame with something magnetic on the other side. On the other end, there is a retractable and flexible wand with a smaller magnet on the end. Sized so that it will fit inside housing openings, the magnet is meant to effortlessly snap onto the corresponding magnet that is at the tip of the housing. The beauty is that you don’t have to see anything – just get the two magnets somewhat close and they snap together allowing you to pull the housing out through the opening.

If you need help seeing what you’re getting into, there is also an LED light built into the tip.

Jagwire pro internal wire housing cable routing tool magnet-7

Jagwire pro internal wire housing cable routing tool magnet-5 Jagwire pro internal wire housing cable routing tool magnet-6

All of the pieces are kept inside the body of the tool in a storage capsule. Included with the kit will be barbs that thread into hydraulic hose or shift cable, as well as a special attachment for Shimano Etube wires. The magnetic dongle then threads into these fittings to ensure that it won’t pull out when yanking the housing through.

Estimated to cost around $35-40, Jagwire expects these to arrive around May.

jagwire.com

 

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15 Comments
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Darryl Duck
6 years ago

Vacuum cleaner, piece of string. better, cheaper.
Maybe this one is a useful thing, but the Park Tool one is a waste of time.

moo
moo
6 years ago
Reply to  Darryl Duck

You’re doing it wrong. The park tool has saved my shop thousands of dollars in labour since its release.

Darryl Duck
6 years ago
Reply to  moo

Moo, I have watched a couple of mechanics trying to prove the worth of the Park one, messed around for half an hour and then I simply used conventional methods and run the cable in a couple of minutes. Not to be out done the other mechanic pulled the cable and tried again with the Park setup, still couldn’t do it. Again I simply used gravity, the angle of the bike frame and a bent spoke to run the cable again. If it gets real hard go with the vacuum, always works. These things are a solution that doesn’t work to a problem that doesn’t exist.

nsajf
nsajf
6 years ago
Reply to  Darryl Duck

D duck, obviously never run a dropper cable or hose. Not a natural run at all.

\m/
\m/
6 years ago

A vacuum and string? Go on as im intrigued

ABW
ABW
6 years ago
Reply to  \m/

Affix string (unwaxed dental floss works well) to end of cable or housing. This is trickier than it sounds as you may need to pull with a bit of force and the string is prone to slipping. Position vacuum over the cable port from which cable will exit. Turn vacuum on. Feed string into frame until the vacuum sucks it out the opposite end of tube. Pull cable through.

michael
michael
6 years ago

Why do bikes need internal cable routing? It sucks.

sean
sean
6 years ago

I will be having one of these.

typevertigo
typevertigo
6 years ago

More options to help with internal cable routing are always welcome.

I’m hoping that estimated $35-40 retail price holds true. Park Tool’s IR-1 is the “pioneering” tool, and I’m sure it has its fans, but I’m not sure I want to spend $55 for it.

Mercianrider
Mercianrider
6 years ago

The Park tool is pretty good and does save a lot of time, but it isn’t perfect. For instance, there’s no easy way to thread the bare end of a metal gear cable through a frame. I had to tape the gear cable to one of the magnets to get it through, which isn’t very elegant.

boom
boom
6 years ago
Reply to  Mercianrider

actually, if you just use the magnet to route the cable – that works great! I agree that these tools are extremely useful and not overhyped at all. I would even go as far as to say it was one of the most innovative tools Park ever made. This looks even better.

fbbmagazine
6 years ago

hoover over hole you want cable to exit, string end into the hole you want the cable to go into … roll out more string … vacuum with draw string from hole at other end (may require something to seal between hoover end and frame but often not) … simply tie the other end to the cable and pull the cable through the frame on the end of the string … way more fiddly, but if it saves you messing about and spending 40 bucks … WINNER!

Chi
Chi
6 years ago

I often worry about the wind damaging my cables.

STS
STS
6 years ago

What a brilliant idea! Now, please go and include some socket with a magnet which fits into the plugs of Shimano’s E-Tube cables.

puffy
puffy
6 years ago

If you have 2 cables to route next to each other does the magnet just stick to the first cable?

Is it better than a J-bend spoke hooking and pulling the cable out of a hole?

It seems like the ticket for a single cable, however.