Bicycle retailer, Jenson USA, has announced the launch of its new suspension servicing center. It is now open and taking bookings for the servicing of forks and shocks from multiple top brands including FOX, Öhlins, Cane Creek, DVO, Marzocchi, and Manitou, with RockShox suspension servicing coming soon. The list of supported forks and shocks is expected to continue to grow in the coming months.

jenson suspension service technician trained by united bicycle

“Our Mechanics train at the renowned United Bicycle Institute on the latest technologies, learning the best techniques, all to ensure our customers’ suspension components are in the absolute best hands possible,” says Jenson Suspension Service project leader, Tucker Carl.

He goes on to say, “Most suspension manufacturers recommend servicing suspension components at 40-50 ride-hour intervals, but most riders either don’t have the time, the tools or the experience to tackle a proper suspension service, and that service offering is what our customers have been asking from us for a while now. We are thrilled to bring this new Jenson Suspension Service to everyone, not just Pro Mountain Bike Racers or cyclists that have access to a dedicated suspension service.”

jenson fork servicing damper bleed

Jenson USA will offer two main services for forks and shocks; Factory Fresh and Seasonal Refresh. The former starts at $160, and is essentially a complete overhaul of the fork or shock in question, including oil change, replacement of seals, damper service and more. The latter is less expensive, starting at $100, and includes fresh oil, regreased seals and O-rings, along with a good cleaning.

Jenson Suspension Service is now available to book online here.

JensonUSA.com

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Jonathan Biddle
3 months ago

I am curious how they will manage packaging – do they send you a box with a return label? Packing up forks is a pain!

Steve
Steve
3 months ago

I don’t mean to be pessimistic, but I seriously doubt they will work on older forks. I’ve got an old Manitou Nixon. I called one of the biggest mtb shops in Portland, Or.
They said they do not service anything older than 2013. I don’t know how it’s still working. Maybe because 95% of the miles on were commuting. Bike rarely got dirty. Home from work in the rain, I usually just had to wipe it down to bring in the house. I’ve built 5 bikes from the frame up and know nothing about forks, except for puttin them on…and what choice of 1 1/8 straight steerer forks are there at 145mm 20mm thru axel. I’m retired and broke. Riding trails all the time now since last year. I’m not getting rid of my 2006 Banshee Scirocco. I’ll just have to save nickels and dimes and hope for a good used one. And Jensen’s service doesn’t sound that reasonable. All anybody is interested is making a buck. You want a new fork, get a new frame, or entire. Oh, the planed obsolescence….

zigzag
zigzag
3 months ago
Reply to  Steve

Have you tried Dirt Labs in Colorado? Yes it involves shipping, but it may be an option and they’re great people to work with.

Jason
Jason
3 months ago

I’ll stick with the manufacturer that made the suspension thanks.

Shafty
Shafty
3 months ago
Reply to  Jason

Most places don’t take in suspension components that old(usually there are some exceptions) because internal seals degrade and they can’t guarantee their work. Some forks and shocks used custom sized/shaped seals that don’t have an off-the-shelf equivalent. Would you rather they call you a week later, tell you it can’t be saved, and refuse to reassemble it? That’s what I’d do. Can’t put old oil and dead seals back in.

Can’t charge for work that can’t be guaranteed, and I’m not about to hand out a free half service when I can’t charge. Many of the last reserves of those spare parts were cleaned out in the last couple years because everyone else had the same idea you have. The reality is there’s not much time to mess with old stuff when 2-3 year old forks and shocks are pouring in. Not efficient at all.

Or maybe hit up your LBS
Or maybe hit up your LBS
3 months ago

I’ve worked with UBI-trained mechanics, and you don’t want them anywhere near your $1000+ fork

Fluid Focus
3 months ago

Everyone can read instructions from an online service manual. But do they really know suspension? Doubt it.