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OneUp tests new Bash Guide – Will it Smash?

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OneUp Components Coconut Bash Smash

Hot on the heels of the internet sensation ‘will it blend?’ OneUp is joining in with ‘will it smash?’ If you aren’t convinced of the benefits to just an upper guide, maybe the coconut shattering power of their Bash Guide will be more to your liking. Most direct mount rings no longer have the option to run a bash guard, though you don’t really want all the force of the impact running through your crank’s spider anyways.

Products like OneUp’s Bash Guide instead channel the impact through the ISCG 05 mounts on the frame which were meant to take the abuse. In order to put the Bash Guide to the test, OneUp loaded the Drop Tower of Destruction and decided to see just what it could smash…

OneUp Components Drop Tower of Destruction

Having just visited OneUp headquarters in Squamish, BC, we can vouch that the Drop Tower of Destruction is indeed real. Considering just how small their creekside operation is, it actually takes up quite a bit of real estate in their office (about as much as their home brew beer operation). But the testing not only proves how strong the Bash Guide is, but it also serves to illustrate how vulnerable your chainring could be to the right impact.

OneUp-Components-ISCG-05-Bash-Guide-DOF2

While not all frames will be compatible with their Bash Guide, those that include ISCG 05 mounts can add one for $79.95 and free world wide shipping.

FEATURES

  • Install without removing your crank
  • Single tool install and adjustment
  • Boost compatible
  • Oval Compatible
  • Stainless Steel hardware
  • Includes 2 top guide pieces 1xBlack 1xGreen
  • Includes 3 bash plates (28-30T, 32-34T, 36T)

SPECS

Weight: 87g 28-30T, 102g 32-34T, 105g 36T
Capacity: 28-36T
Chainline: 5.5mm adjustment
Mount: ISCG05
Color: Black and Green top guide pieces included
Material: 7075 aluminum, top guide glass reinforced thermoplastic

oneupcomponents.com

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11 Comments
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Good Mythical Morning
Good Mythical Morning
6 years ago

Will it taco?

Jon @ OneUp
6 years ago
Dead
Dead
6 years ago

I weigh more then your test rig… Now I can ride over watermelons and water balloons without worry.

G33ky Fr34ky
6 years ago

Totally useless test, since when does a rider + bike = @40lbs +/- (guessing that’s about what the test rig weighs). At the very least start with a 150-170lb test weight, then at least it would have some legitimacy.

Jon @ OneUp
6 years ago
Reply to  G33ky Fr34ky

Force is mass multiplied by acceleration F=ma (in this case deceleration). In the real world the deceleration the bash sees is significantly lower (crank flex, ankle, knee and arm bend, movement of the obstacle on trail). This means the mass can be significantly higher.

In our test the deceleration is very high (as close to instant as we could get) so the mass needed to achieve a very high force can be quite low.

Long story short, we can accurately create trail loads with a rig that it doesn’t take two people to lift. If that weren’t the case we wouldn’t be able to destroy rings the way the video shows.

Alejandro
Alejandro
3 years ago
Reply to  Jon @ OneUp

I love when engineering and science shuts people mouth, well done

aaron
aaron
6 years ago

The lack of weight is handled by the height of the drop. Oh, and lighten up everyone. They just wanted to smash some stuff.

G33ky Fr34ky
6 years ago

@jon @ Oneup I’m sorry but my weight @250 + bike @35lbs coming off a 6′ drop, hitting that bashguard onto a rock is going to have a significantly higher impact than your, we’ll estimate 6.5′ high, rig will ever see without any weight. BTW rings aren’t that strong, as evident by the slight bend your rig was able to make even though it’s not a real world scenario, hence the reason riders use bashguards.

Robin
Robin
6 years ago
Reply to  G33ky Fr34ky

Actually someone who’s passed a non-AP high school physics class would be able to do the required, simple calculation to tell you that the total weight of their test rig would only have to be 22.8 lbs to generate the same impact force as you dropping off your 6″ drop (assuming the time over which the change in momentum occurs is the same for both cases.). Just looking watching the video, 22.8 lbs might be a reasonable guess at the weight of the assembly being dropped.

Jon @ OneUp
6 years ago
Reply to  G33ky Fr34ky

@G33ky Fr34ky – Our rig has destroyed every bash guard we’ve thrown at it when taken to the necessary height (ours and our competitors). That’s how we can benchmark our strength.

As I noted above the on trail deceleration of your 285lbs is significantly slower than the near instant deceleration of our rig. That’s why we can run less weight.

We could drop 285lbs onto something like 6″ of rubber to slow the deceleration and achieve the same force but that rig would be a bear to operate.

I hope that helps,
Jon

David Guerra
6 years ago

What concerns me the most is the interaction with the frame. All this force goes to three screw mounts and three screws. A lot of force to be taken laterally. A bottom bracket could deal with great hits if this force was more distributed, and not just concentrated on the body of three screws.

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