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PC15: Orbea Ticks Down to New Ordu OMP Tri/TT Bike

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Orbea Ordu OMP TT Tri bike Orbea ordu tt tri IMG_7725

At this point the cat’s out of the bag, but Orbea has a new TT/Tri bike up their sleeve. Extending the Ordu’s lineage, the new OMP model comes as the brand is celebrating their 175th anniversary! If you do the math, you’ll realize that’s probably too early for bikes which is true. Orbea surprisingly started manufacturing guns and bullets almost 175 years ago. Eventually the gun business was sold off and Orbea first started turning the pedals in the 1920’s.

Watching the video which celebrates their storied history, you start to get a sense of just how quickly bicycle have evolved in the last 20 years. Bicycles like the new Ordu are now looking for every advantage whether it be carbon construction, aerodynamics, or integration. Translated to ‘moment’ in Basque, Orbea hopes the Ordu will give you the ‘time of your life’…

Orbea Ordu OMP TT Tri bike Orbea ordu tt tri IMG_7732

Orbea Ordu OMP TT Tri bike Orbea ordu tt tri IMG_7740 Orbea Ordu OMP TT Tri bike Orbea ordu tt tri IMG_7739

Orbea Ordu OMP TT Tri bike Orbea ordu tt tri IMG_7736

At first glance, those familiar with modern aero TT/Tri bikes will notice the Ordu doesn’t include the insane integration level of some of the competition or even the previous Ordu. According to Orbea’s product managers, that’s on purpose. Having the ‘time of your life’ (that’s their slogan for the new bike, if you didn’t catch on yet) means having one of the fastest bikes possible, but at the same time it means having a bike that you can actually work on without having to run the shop so they can open the brakes to fix a flat.

Starting with a UCI legal monocoque frame, the 5th generation of Ordu since 2007 is built specifically around the new TriRig Omega X aero brakes. Pointing out that the Omega X is easier to work on thanks to its new magnetic aero cover while offering better braking performance than many integrated brakes, the key is that it offers “most of the benefits of an integrated brake without being a pain in the ass.”

The front brake has been utilized in the design of the new Freeflow fork which uses wider spaced legs for less turbulence around the front wheel and fork. For the front the brake has its own cable hanger which allows for a more aerodynamic positioning of the brake housing, while the rear cable neatly exits out of the seat tube for the center pull brake. If you’d rather run standard side pull calipers, the frame includes a housing port on the left side of the sea tube for the housing run.

Orbea Ordu OMP TT Tri bike Orbea ordu tt tri IMG_7731

Orbea Ordu OMP TT Tri bike Orbea ordu tt tri IMG_7727 Orbea Ordu OMP TT Tri bike Orbea ordu tt tri IMG_7730

While the frame shapes were developed with the help of Mondragon University, they feature a fairly common profile these days with abbreviated tail sections, flattened sides and double radius leading edges. The work with Mondragon led to a new frame that Orbea claims is 194g lighter than Ordu OME (which remains unchanged), as well as 10 percent faster, and an impressive 26 percent faster than 2012 Ordu Gold.

Ordu specs

Following the same program as the brakes, for the stem Orbea wanted something that would be more aerodynamic than your average stem, but was just as easy to work on and didn’t limit stem choice. Their answer to the question is an aluminum shroud which sits behind the stem to smooth out the transition between it and the frame. Essentially a spacer that sits under the headset top cap, the shroud above is still an early 3D printed prototype, but the final shape should be similar. Under that stem you’ll find the Orbea Mini Taper which is their name for a 1 1/8″ to 1″ tapered steerer for better aerodynamics due to a 10% reduction in frontal area. The included shim will allow the use of 1 1/8″ stems.

Even though the new Ordu OMP is currently being used by Team Cofidis at the tour, Orbea knows that most consumers will be using the bike for Triathlons rather than TTs. In order to offer the ability to carry all of your gear at neatly as possible, the Ordu uses their Multi Mount System for a number of accessories. On the top tube you’ll find a bag mount for your typical fuel pouch, while at the rear you’ll find their new box mount for tubes, CO2 cartridges and more. The Ordu will have its own box that bolts in place but at the time of PressCamp it was still in prototype form. When asked what the additions would do for aerodynamics, Orbea said they won’t make the bike any slower but the goal wasn’t necessarily to make the bike faster but to offer a clean method of storage.

The frame also includes a water bottle mount on the down tube and seat tube which will allow for single large aero bottles or dual standard cages.

Orbea Ordu OMP TT Tri bike Orbea ordu tt tri IMG_7728 Orbea Ordu OMP TT Tri bike Orbea ordu tt tri IMG_7726

Using a proprietary aero seat post, the Ordu OMP’s symmetrical post was co-designed with FSA to offer nearly ever saddle position possible. Using separate bolts for fore/aft and tilt adjustments, the post is available in 23 or 49mm offsets which are both reversible for an extreme range of position and is oval rail compatible.

The OMP also includes the new Tgale saddle which was designed in conjunction with Prologo.

Orbea Ordu OMP TT Tri bike Orbea ordu tt tri IMG_7743 Orbea Ordu OMP TT Tri bike Orbea ordu tt tri IMG_7734

Orbea Ordu OMP TT Tri bike Orbea ordu tt tri IMG_7735

When it comes to electronics integration you won’t be performing any quick battery swaps, but the pack is neatly stowed inside the Hatchback area with access from the back of the BB in front of the rear wheel. The bolt exposed just behind the chainring holds the battery in place. With EC-DC mechanical or electronic internal routing the frame uses a BB386 bottom bracket with a massive profile extending from the chain stays and semi vertical dropouts for easy wheel changes and clearance for 25mm tires.

Orbea Ordu OMP TT Tri bike Orbea ordu tt tri IMG_7744

This particular bike came in just under 19lbs with a water bottle, but the production model is said to be a bit lighter. Using a multisport geometry, the Ordu OMP will be available in 5 sizes with a linear stack and reach with more of a race fit compared to the OME endurance fit. Available later this fall, pricing is still TBA.

Orbea Ordu OMP 2016 geometry

Orbea Ordu OMP 2016 geometry 2

Orbea.com

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anonymous
anonymous
7 years ago

Stem fairing is an interesting solution to integrated stem/frame.

gringo
gringo
7 years ago

And yet again Orbea copies Scott…..

they should copy someone else for once…

David
David
7 years ago

I see very little from Scott here. Apart from the usual convergence of all top TT bikes.
Having forced clients to sell Orbea TT bikes in the past in order to get something good I am slightly surprised that they’ve come out with a nice bike. Really smart fit range and nice features.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
7 years ago

This is surely no Scott copy. That said, as bikes get better and better, differences will disappear and paint will be the main thing that makes a bike different. I really liked the last Ordu but the cable design was terrible and the stem slipped on the two customers I sold them to. This won’t be in issue on this bike. Basically its got some Cervelo like shaping with a level stem…something I can’t believe Cervelo didn’t do but they managed to make the fastest bike on the market without it(pretty much every other bike company agrees that its faster than their bikes at low yaw). I’d like to see how this compares.

Benny
Benny
7 years ago

I remember when Orbea was really going for the rounded off, nary a sharp angle look with their Orca models. Now they are going for the exact opposite and have gone completely geometric.

John M.
7 years ago

As new bikes get introduced like this one, it is interesting to see the convergence of design elements borrowed from many other manufacturers over the years and then integrated into these newer designs like this Ordu. Aerofoil shaped frame tubes originally from Columbus Air tubing (or Hooker Elite) on to Cervelo’s NACA profiles and finally on to these truncated low Reynold’s number foils ala Scott Foil or Trek. Seat tubes shielding the rear wheel thanks to Cervelo are now found on most TT or Tri bikes. On the other hand, the Orbea’s Tri Rig brakes are a slight departure from the pain-in-the-ass to set up integrated V-brakes that can be found on most high-end TT bikes. This decision was obviously done in the interest of easy setup and excellent braking power and modulation that the Tri Rig’s are known for. I even use the Tri Rigs on my Cervelo S2 criterium race bike and love them. From now on, it is very likely that only slight asymptotic improvements will be made into future designs of TT or Tri bikes.

'Merika
'Merika
7 years ago

I heard this can shave 5 minutes and 3 seconds from a 40km TT.

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