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Otso Waheela C gravel bike gains carbon frame that can run all the tires

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Even though you’re probably more familiar with their sister company, Wolf Tooth Components, Otso Cycles is still out there developing some exciting new bikes. Along the way they’ve introduced an innovative carbon fat bike, and two different gravel bikes as well. The difference is that the two gravel bikes were made from metal – steel and stainless steel. Both forms of the metal are great materials to build bikes with, but you could probably guess that a carbon gravel rig was in the works. And if there was, you could probably guess that it would include their Tuning Chip dropout system. And you’d be right. Introducing the Otso Waheela C – a carbon gravel bike with a bit of a split personality for all of your drop bar adventures.

Otso Waheela C gravel bike gains carbon frame that can run all the tiresOne of the most notable for the Waheela C is the frame material itself. As mentioned, this time it’s EPS molded carbon fiber which allowed Otso to substantially drop the weight to 1024g for a bare medium frameset with a 490g Lithic Hiili 420 fork. But more than just weight, the move to carbon has allowed Otso to incorporate every feature of the Waheela S while also improving the ride with bowed seat stays, the ability to run an internal dropper post, and more.

Otso Waheela C gravel bike gains carbon frame that can run all the tires Otso Waheela C gravel bike gains carbon frame that can run all the tires

Otso Waheela C gravel bike gains carbon frame that can run all the tires

Can’t decide on what tires you want for your next adventure? With the Waheela, you don’t have to. Thanks to an insane amount of clearance combined with their Tuning Chip adjustable dropout system, the frame is designed to work equally well with anything from a 700c x 28/30mm, to a full on 29 x 2.1″ mountain bike tire. You can also run 650b x 2.1 as well.

Want to run something other than a rigid fork? The Waheela C was designed around a longer fork in the first place so that if you swap out to something like the Fox AX or Lauf Grit, the resulting ride is improved.

Otso Waheela C gravel bike gains carbon frame that can run all the tires Otso Waheela C gravel bike gains carbon frame that can run all the tires

Otso Waheela C gravel bike gains carbon frame that can run all the tires

Try this with your average gravel bike and you’ll either run into clearance issues with the huge tires or you’ll end up with some funky BB heights thanks to the difference in tire height. The Otso Tuning Chip system addresses this by mounting the adjustable dropout in the frame at an angle, so the different positions actually raise or lower the bottom bracket height by 4mm while providing 20mm of chainstay length adjustment through three predetermined settings.

Otso Waheela C gravel bike gains carbon frame that can run all the tires

Shown above are the components of the Voytek’s Tuning Chip dropout system, but the concept is the same for the Waheela. The derailleur hanger and brake mount plate have a threaded post, which is then inserted through one of two spacers. One spacer set results in the forward or rearward axle position (by flipping the spacer), and the second spacer set is used for the middle setting. After choosing the axle position and inserting the spacer, a nut is threaded onto the dropout, securing the Tuning Chip in place. From there, it’s a standard thru axle system with a tooled axle.

Otso Waheela C gravel bike gains carbon frame that can run all the tires

Otso Waheela C gravel bike gains carbon frame that can run all the tires

Built for adventures, the Waheela C includes a number of additional mounts including a three pack mount on both sides of the downtube, twin mounts on the top tube, and full coverage fender and rack mounts.

Featuring internally routed cables with internal sleeves and a carbon access door under the bottom bracket, the frame also includes the ability to run an internal dropper post – perfect for use with Wolf Tooth’s new dropbar dropper ReMote. Built to be 1x or 2x compatible with both mechanical or electronic drivetrains, the frame is either post mount or flat mount brake compatible with the correct adapters. A threaded bottom bracket is used along with thru axles front and rear.

Otso Waheela C gravel bike gains carbon frame that can run all the tires

In spite of the ability to run huge tires, Otso points out that this is not a drop bar mountain bike – but a gravel bike capable of running 29 x 2.1″ tires. However, the frame does have some progressive geometry numbers that result in the rider’s weight shifted a bit farther back for improved stability and handling on rougher terrain and builds that feature shorter stems and wider bars. You’ll find a 71.5° head tube angle and 72.5° seat tube angle along with 420-440mm chainstays, and four sizes.

Otso Waheela C gravel bike gains carbon frame that can run all the tires Otso Waheela C gravel bike gains carbon frame that can run all the tires

Otso Waheela C gravel bike gains carbon frame that can run all the tires
Otso Cycles Waheela C

Otso Waheela C gravel bike gains carbon frame that can run all the tires

Offered in three colors, the Waheela C starts at $3,499 for the base build above or $2,049 for the frameset. Want something different than the base build? Otso has a custom build program that allows you pick and choose most of the parts to build your own dream Waheela C. Available now in medium and large frames, the small and extra large frames will be available soon.

Stay tuned for our full review up next!

otsocycles.com

 

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15 Comments
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JeffH
JeffH
3 years ago

Nice looking bike with adjustability to play with for increased entertainment value!
Strange routing for the front brake hose though. Looks like that would become a maintenance issue.

DeafDaddy
DeafDaddy
3 years ago

$3,500 for a base build starting with 105 (& generally entry-level specs)? Nice bike and I’m sure dentists, lawyers, and yuppie wannabes won’t have a problem plunking down their soft earned money, but I’ll (and many others will) pass…

Dudeguy
Dudeguy
3 years ago

Is this an open mould frame?

Volsung
Volsung
3 years ago
Reply to  Dudeguy

No. The article mentions the proprietary dropouts that Otso has used for several years

Brendan Moore
3 years ago
Reply to  Dudeguy

@dudeguy it is definite not open mold. All of our bikes and even the forks are designed from the ground up.

Frank
Frank
3 years ago

With that kind of tire clearance, I’m wondering what the q-factor is?

Tom
Tom
3 years ago

Looks nice, and at that weight, with two sets of wheels, it can be your gravel bike and road bike.

Saves money and room in the garage!

Brendan Moore
3 years ago
Reply to  Tom

Thanks Tom.
We will be showing some builds coming up that range from a sub 16 lb road bike to a 19 lb back road bruiser with 29×2.1. The stock wheels are 22mm internal so they will actually accommodate 28mm up to 29×2.1. However, like you noted many will choose to have 2 wheelsets to avoid tire swapping and allow for more optimization.

Wade
Wade
3 years ago
Reply to  Brendan Moore

I’d be all in on this bike with a 17-18lb build. Couldn’t be happier with my Voytek

DougB
DougB
3 years ago

That would make for an awesome dirt and road commuter 🙂

K-Pop is dangerous to your health
K-Pop is dangerous to your health
3 years ago
Reply to  DougB

$3.5k for a carbon “commuter”?… You must never have to lock your bike anywhere on your… commute.

Joey Brown
Joey Brown
3 years ago

@Brendan Moore – Nicely done!

Involuntary Soul
Involuntary Soul
3 years ago

too much gap between the fork and downtube, looks ugly

K-Pop is dangerous to your health
K-Pop is dangerous to your health
3 years ago

This is what suspension corrected frames look like. [facepalm]

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