Having a tough time deciding what type of bike to get? Maybe you don’t have to. Pine Cycles just debuted their first bike which is a road bike, gravel bike, and a Tracklocross bike—just not all at the same time.

Pine Cycles Rasa Zona tubing

Pine Cycles Rasa made in USA

All three of those builds utilize the exact same frame, which is built from Columbus Zona tubing here in the U.S.

Pine Cycles Rasa 1 1/4" head tube

Pine Cycles states that they specified a 1 1/4″ straight head tube since it still allows for the use of a tapered carbon fork, but it’s lighter than a 44mm head tube. That means you can use carbon forks with 1 1/8 to 1 1/4″ tapered steerers, or any 1 1/8″ straight steerer with an adapter. The lighter head tube is part of what Pine credits for getting the weight down to 1859g for a 56cm steel frame.

Pine Cycles Rasa x lichen precision dropouts

Key to the 3-bikes-in-1 concept is the custom droputs built in partnership with Lichen Precision. Thanks to the replaceable inserts, the dropouts are capable of running 135 x 10 horizontal track dropouts, 135 x 10 QR dropouts for rim brakes, or 142 x 12mm flat mount dropouts for dis brakes. Pine mentions that rack and fender mounts are optional on all three.

Pine Cycles Rasa geared

Pine Cycles Rasa geared

Pine Cycles Rasa fixed or single speed

That obviously gives you multiple choices for drivetrains including fixed or free single speed use, 2x geared, or 1x geared.

Pine Cycles Rasa gravel bike

Pine Cycles Rasa road bike

Pine Cycles Rasa tracklocross bike

When it comes to tires, the frame will fit up to 700c x 35mm, 650b x 48mm, and 26 x 2.3″ rubber.

Pine Cycles Rasa geometry

Depending on the tire, wheel, and fork choice, there are bound to be some slight differences in geometry from setup to setup, but Pine provides one geometry chart with separate trail numbers based on wheel size. For more info on all the compatible tires, brakes, fenders, and more, Pine put together an impressive spread sheet with all the options they’ve found so far.

 

TECH SPECS

  • Steel Frames Proudly Made in USA
  • Columbus Zona Tubing,  Front & Rear Triangle
  • Custom 1 1/4” Headtube
  • Carbon Disc Fork Includes Custom White Industries Headset (EC37/28.6 | EC37/33) 
  • Steel Fork Includes Adapters for Standard 1 1/8” Hedsets (EC34/28.6 | EC34/30)
  • External Routing Under Downtube / Internal Under Toptube
  • Max Tire Clearance 700×35, 650×48, 26×2.3
  • Max Chainring: 1x – 44T / 2x – 50T/34T
  • 28.6mm band on front derailleur
  • 29.8/30.0mm Seatpost Collar
  • 68mm Threaded BB shell
  • 3 Sets of Bottle Bosses
  • 27.2mm Seatpost

Fork Options

  • Carbon Disc Brake – Allied All Road Fork / 1 ⅛” – 1 ¼” Tapered Steerer / 12×100 Axle / 48mm Rake / 375mm A to C / Matte Black 
  • Steel Disc/Rim Brake – Pine Segmented Fork / 1 ⅛” Straight Steerer / QRx100 Axle / 50mm Rake / 375mm A to C / Gloss Black
  • Carbon Rim Brake – Whisky No.7 RD+ Mid Reach Fork / 1 ⅛” Straight Steerer / QRx100 Axle / 45mm Rake / 375mm A to C / Matte Black

Pine x Lichen RASA Dropouts with optional inserts:

  • 12×142 Flat Mount / Disc Brake (rack/fender mounts optional)
  • 135×10 Quick Release / Rim Brake  (rack/fender mounts optional)
  • 135×10 Horizontal Track / Rim/No Brake  (rack/fender mounts optional)

Additional frame details include a 68mm threaded bottom bracket, three bottle mounts, and a 27.2mm seat post.

With pricing starting at $2,100 for the frame and steel fork, the addition of a carbon disc fork bumps it up to $2,400 for the frame fork, headset, and fork. Pine Cycles is requiring a 50% deposit at the time of order, and preorders placed by December 30th will ship by February 2022.

pinecycles.com

 

 

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19 Comments
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Rob
Rob
1 month ago

where on earth are you supposed to get a headset for this thing? Why spec a 37mm headtube to save a few grams when you limit the headsets your customers can get and don’t allow them to run 1 1/2″ tapered forks? Who is gram counting with a bike like this?

paulpalf
paulpalf
1 month ago

These frames have typical drop-bar reach numbers, so it’s going to be extremely short if you put a flat bar on the same frame. My MTB has 85mm longer reach than my gravel bike!

ap
ap
1 month ago

An intriguing offering for sure, but why oh why did they go with a 1 1/4″ steer tube? Why not a tapered or 1 1/8 steer tube? Something standard? Good luck finding a replacement fork. Or a headset.

pinecycles
pinecycles
1 month ago

Hi Paul, The frame is a true gravel/allroad bike primarily designed for drop bars. However, we’ve found that a flat bar set up provides a more upright position often preferred by riders commuting, touring and bikepacking.

When running flat bars we recommend more traditional road stem lengths and a forward sweeping bar such at the SimWorks Getaround Bar featured on the frame above.

Jaap
Jaap
1 month ago

Really digging that EC37 headtube

pinecycles
pinecycles
1 month ago

Hi Rob, Zach hit the nail on the head with the headset options. We are working with other headset manufactures to offer this headset standard in the future as well.

The headtube has helped us achieve a frame weight of 1859g (Size 56cm) which is at or below most any production steel or titanium gravel bikes on the market at a lower cost. The ultralight Allied Allroad Fork (320g uncut steerer) brings the frameset weight to 2179g.

Compare that to the equivalent size Open U.P. Frame (Large) at 1150g and 425g uncut fork. Totaling 1575g. Only 604g/1.3lbs off of a premium carbon frameset at $600 less for a US made frame, fork and headset with even more versatility. If you weren’t gram counting before, maybe it’s time to start!

pinecycles
pinecycles
1 month ago

Hi AP, As I mentioned to Rob, the headtube allows us to drop significant weight but also maintains a really nice aesthetic with our steel fork. 44 or 34/44 headtubes look terrible with skinny steel forks ATMO.

If a customer ever needed a replacement fork, both the ENVE AR and Columbus Futura Gravel 1 1/8″ – 1 1/4″ Tapered Forks are suitable replacements. However they will be more limiting with tire clearance and will ever so slightly change the geo from the longer length.

Joe M
Joe M
1 month ago

I would prefer a frame with frame sliders on the back. (wait, I already have one) These have been around for years and the way they are designed, you can swap between single speed, regular drop-out with skewer, 12mm thru axle with derailleur hanger and with or without disc mount. Then I would widen up the stays and go with at least the 148mm hub standard and allow the bike to take wider tires and fit 27.5, 29 or 700C wheels. (If one really wants a more versatile multipurpose frame)

These days, why any one would want a bike without a tapered headset is beyond me.

Astro Kraken
Astro Kraken
1 month ago

What’s going on with the Ekar shifter in the video? Is this just what it looks like with the shifter all the way in and brake lever all the way out?

Big Randy
Big Randy
1 month ago

Proprietary Headset? No thanks… Cannondale already has that on lock.

I’d be curious to know what happens when White Industries stops supporting that size and the EC37 is not common from others like Cane Creek, Wolf Tooth, etc. King used to make these but I cant find them on their site.

Seems interesting to focus on the head tube to save weight. I’d rather see a standard 44/44 head tube and let the end user lighten their bike up with nice wheels, drive train, etc.

pinecycles
pinecycles
1 month ago

Hi Joe M, We are currently developing sliding inserts for the RASA dropout system! Stay tuned for those in the next few months!

We designed the RASA to be the perfect road to gravel frame. If you’re seeking more tire clearance and more of a gravel to mountain frame this isn’t it but stay tuned…

The Headset is tapered! The White Industries headset and Allied Allroad Fork are 1 1/8″ – 1 1/4″ Tapered. (EC37/28.6 | EC37/33)

pinecycles
pinecycles
1 month ago

Hi Big Randy, The headset uses standard 1 1/8″ upper and 1 1/4″ lower bearings from Enduro so customers will have no issues replacing bearings until the end of time.

If you somehow managed to damage the headset cups beyond use and White Ind no longer made them then you could simply use the EC37 to EC34 adapters and use a 1 1/8″ straight fork with a standard EC34 headset (which we offer). That’s getting deep into hypotheticals though.

The 1 1/4″ Headtube also helped us reduce cost over a 44mm. Passing that savings to our customers allows them to make those upgrades to further decrease weight and increase performance!

barael
barael
1 month ago

I don’t know what the heck “tracklocross” is, but my Rondo HVRT has a flip chip fork that turns it from aggressive road racing geo to endurance geo and dropped seat stay so you can swap in some properly fat 650b wheels and tires, so excuse me for not having my mind blown by this “world-first” 3-in-1 concept.

pinecycles
pinecycles
1 month ago

Barael, You are excused. “3 in 1” was bikerumor’s interpretation because we showcased 3 different builds. However the RASA can accommodate 3 wheel sizes, 3 dropout inserts and 3 fork options making it “18 in 1”. We’re also working on a sliding flat mount insert that will bump it up “24 in 1”. Current configurations below.

The Rondo HVRT is a very cool bike but actually has a little less tire clearance than the RASA. Rondo states 700×30 / 650×47 on their website. Rasa is 700×35 / 650×48 / 26×2.3. Our chainstays are a little longer at 419mm for added stability so no need to drop them for tire clearance.

700c Disc Brake Carbon Fork
700c Disc Brake Steel Fork
700c Rim Brake Carbon Fork
700c Rim Brake Steel Fork
700c Single Speed Rim Brake Carbon Fork
700c Single Speed Rim Brake Steel Fork

650b Disc Brake Carbon Fork
650b Disc Brake Steel Fork
650b Rim Brake Carbon Fork
650b Rim Brake Steel Fork
650b Single Speed Rim Brake Carbon Fork
650b Single Speed Rim Brake Steel Fork

26″ Disc Brake Carbon Fork
26″ Disc Brake Steel Fork
26″ Rim Brake Carbon Fork
26″ Rim Brake Steel Fork
26″ Single Speed Rim Brake Carbon Fork
26″ Single Speed Rim Brake Steel Fork

barael
barael
1 month ago

Fair enough, the RASA certainly looks like it can be built up in much more ways than say the HVRT so could be a really fun project bike.

Joe M
Joe M
1 month ago

Hello again Pinecycles. Personally I would stick with 1-1/2 x 1-1-1/8 tapered headset. This appears to be one of the few bearing combinations/standard that will persist for many years to come. It works well for road, gravel/cross and mtn bikes. (I understand that is add some complexity to building a frame having to use a formed head tube.) Plus, on a steel frame, who cares about a few more grams. If I want the lightest frame possible I would go with a carbon frame rather than steel. (My carbon gravel frame weighs only 950 grams – 1/2 your steel frame weight.)

I see the gravel market migrating towards 29er hardtail geometries and a crossover towards mtn hardtails rather than road bikes. I’ve ridden over 5K miles on my gravel bike, and discovered its limitation of not being able to descend fast enough on rough washboard riddled forest service roads. My next build is a TI 29er hardtail based frame that will let me quickly swap forks from rigid to suspension, and/or run mtn bars or gravel bars. I have many friends that have gone this route and they leave me in downhill dust riding their 29er hardtails. Going with the mtn geometry, they often use a rigid fork that can accommodate a wider front tire than gravel/road forks. They will run a 38 or 40 gravel tire on the back and a 2.0 on the front. The bigger front tire absorbs road shock a lot better than regular gravel tires. Their 29er based rides have no problem keeping up on asphalt when they use appropriate tires and air pressure.

Veselin Mandaric
1 month ago

@pinecycles if you want to save cost, buy my Columbus tubes and unicrown fork blades what I don’t know what to do with them and don’t want to throw them in the garbage.