PNW Components raises their customer service w/ new Lifetime Warranty for all products

PNW’s products are affordable, highly functional, and often rebuildable. Now, you can also add guaranteed for life to that list. Effective immediately, PNW Component has announced that all existing and future products will be covered by their new Lifetime Warranty.

PNW Components Lifetime warranty addition

From the beginning, PNW has focused on creating a consumer-friendly brand. That’s been highlighted recently with announcements like their PNW Cycled program which uses refurbished and blemished products to offer consumers a lower priced alternative to brand new posts, while keeping more of the old posts out of landfills.

Aaron Kerson, Co-Founder of PNW Components, says that, “”When Emily and I started the company back in 2015, we wanted to create the most customer-centric brand in the industry. For us that means treating our customers like we’d want to be treated, and creating reliable and affordable products that also look great. We’re ecstatic to follow through with this vision and offer a lifetime warranty on all of our products to existing and future customers. We truly are here to give our customers the best experience possible.”

Of course, like any warranty, there are stipulations. You must be the original owner of the post with proof of purchase. The warranty “does not cover damage caused by accident, improper care, improper installation, negligence, normal wear and tear, or the natural breakdown of colors and materials over extended time and use,” so like most it just covers the product were it to fail due to a manufacturing defect. Products must be clean, and submitted to PNW through their Warranty Return Form (linked below). From the sounds of it, this warranty will apply to those who already own a PNW product as well as any new products purchased after the fact.

pnwcomponents.com

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thesteve4761
thesteve4761
1 year ago

I’d rather have a product whose warranty I never have to consider. This change makes me less, not more, likely to purchase a PNW product in the future.

Yagil
Yagil
1 year ago
Reply to  thesteve4761

Why? After all, it’s not that they asked you to do something – every company offers a warranty of sorts, and the just decided to extend it. Can’t see any problem with that.
(BTW, I have a PNW Coast for my hardtail and love it – finally, a good suspension seatpost combined with a dropper. I have it for about a year, and it’s trouble-free so far)

thesteve4761
thesteve4761
1 year ago
Reply to  Yagil

Because to explicitly state it suggests that they’ve penciled out an acceptable failure rate as a simple cost of doing business. The cost of which must then be front end built into the price of the product. I’d rather pay less, or have a less conservatively built product.

The type of brand who has taken this long to jump onto the lifetime warranty bandwagon is not the type of brand looking in the right places for inspiration. Me too move at best.

Gillis
Gillis
1 year ago
Reply to  thesteve4761

That’s some backwards thinking. If they believed their product wouldn’t hold up, then a lifetime warranty would not make financial sense. Imo, a lifetime warranty IS a warranty I never have to consider because I can expect the product to last.

Cheese
Cheese
1 year ago
Reply to  Gillis

“does not cover . . . the natural breakdown of . . . materials over . . . time and use”

Tiny
Tiny
1 year ago

TheSteve, that doesn’t make sense to me. I understand it’s your opinion, but I don’t get it. You DONT have to think about the warranty, or the “oops it failed 3 months after their 2 year period so now I’m screwed “. Sorry buddy

Deputy Dawg
Deputy Dawg
1 year ago

If this stuff broke a lot, they couldn’t afford to offer this warranty extension.

Good on ’em!

thesteve4761
thesteve4761
1 year ago
Reply to  Deputy Dawg

A warranty only matters if a part breaks. The part shouldn’t break. So the warranty shouldn’t be part of the conversation. Ever. The second it is, you and the brand both lose, since to understand the warranty means one must imagine a world in which the product failed. If I wanted insurance, I’d buy insurance, not a physical product.

Deputy Dawg
Deputy Dawg
1 year ago
Reply to  thesteve4761

Not for me. Ever. To me, a long-term warranty says “we make good stuff, but know that crap happens on occasion, and we’re here for you when it does”.

thesteve4761
thesteve4761
1 year ago
Reply to  Deputy Dawg

Yet we’re still here talking about what happens when PNW parts fail, instead of how they perform when they work. The conversation itself is a failure for PNW.

How often do failures occur while you’re standing in a bike shop ready to deal with the issue? How many days and how much labor/shipping cost might be involved once you do get to said shop? Nothing is without cost.

How often do failures occur when you are out riding, pissed off because you now have to deal with at least a busted part if not a busted body and a potential hike since your bike has failed?

I get it, my opinion isn’t yours. I’m used to that.

If the warranty was the point, it would be buried on the webpage for nobody to see until they broke something. If the marketing of the warranty was the point, we’d see this. The last paragraph of the story (press release?) is the telling point. It’s a lifetime warranty that covers anything PNW wants it to cover, and nothing they don’t want it to cover. Pretty huge loophole there. Ergo, it’s a marketing effort at best.

nooner
nooner
1 year ago

They make a decent 170mm dropper post and it won’t cost you a kidney. The extended warranty is a bonus, imho.

Gillis
Gillis
1 year ago

I have handlebars (road and mtb) that are 15-20 years old. So personally I am no concerned with “the natural breakdown of . . . materials over . . . time and use”.
The warranty offered here adds piece of mind, imo.

JeffO
JeffO
1 year ago

A lot of companies known for making great, unusually reliable products offer this kind of warranty because they know they won’t have to pay off on it often, and so it’s basically a free selling point. If your products are junk and you have to replace a large number of them under warranty you’re going out of business. It’s pretty simple and assertions to the contrary are simply illogical.

thesteve4761
thesteve4761
1 year ago
Reply to  JeffO

Sram brakes and their decade plus of problems defy your supposedly logical statement.

Franklin Greens
Franklin Greens
1 year ago

I’d say that the warranty is equivocal to the price point on their stuff, quit whining. You want one that you can exchange after you break it? Pay more, period.