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Saris Glide rack borrows MTB suspension design for one step trunk access

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It’s an age old question – what is the best way to be able to access the trunk of your car with a bike rack installed. For most racks, that means tilting. Through a various combination of pulling pins, pushing buttons, and straining to make sure the weight of the bikes doesn’t bring them crashing to a halt once the rack reaches the end of its travel. The new Saris Glide aims to simplify all of that. With a single button and a gentle push or pull, the Glide moves out of the way and back in place in one smooth motion.

Saris Glide rack borrows MTB suspension design for one step trunk access

Saris Glide rack borrows MTB suspension design for one step trunk access

The secret to the rack’s ease of use is the ‘four bar’ linkage which came from Saris’ chief mechanical Engineer, BJ Bass. Stemming from his own design sketches of a full suspension mountain bike, BJ realized that the linkage would allow the center of mass for the bikes on the rack to remain mostly in the same plane. That means much easier movement of the rack while fully loaded, and a motion that can be done with one hand.

And yet, the Glide is still impressively light. At 35lbs, the rack makes use of aluminum for the frame and structure and engineered plastic for the latch to keep things light. Available in four or five bike versions, the Glide will support individual bikes up to 35lbs. Bikes are held in place with low profile cradles and ratchet straps, and the EX version includes integrated locks for the rack and the bikes.

To make installation as easy as possible, the rack will fit both 1 1/4″ or 2″ receivers, and installs without tools with a unique adjustable wedge system that eliminates slop at the receiver.

Saris Glide rack borrows MTB suspension design for one step trunk access

There are colors as well – standard black, or copper and saphire blue.

Now for another interesting bit – the Glide is being launched on Kickstarter. Yes, Saris is launching a new rack on the crowdfunding site (and at ridiculously low prices). Why? Saris says that the campaign will allow early supporters to have input into the rack’s final design, while also allowing Saris to keep manufacturing products in the U.S. With production scheduled for for early Spring 2018, and racks priced as low as $100 through Kickstarter (sorry, already gone) it seems like a pretty good deal for consumers – even if you get in at the current price of $250 for the four bike EX version or $275 for the 5 bike EX version. Retail price is set at $499 and $549, so if you like the design of the Glide (as we did when we saw a prototype), you’d better hurry – there are only around 100 racks left through the Kickstarter eligible for the special deal.

Once the racks are produced, Saris hopes the momentum will carry forward into shops where the Glide will be available through their normal distribution channels.

kickstarter.com

saris.com

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16 Comments
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Dude
Dude
5 years ago

Half off retail on Kickstarter! Yes please. Order placed.

luddite
luddite
5 years ago

I thought softride had a patent on the parallelogram linkage for bike racks?

Sarah Reiter
Sarah Reiter
5 years ago
Reply to  luddite

The SoftRide product is based on a parallel design but the Glide is not a parallel design. A parallel design lowers and raises the weight of the bikes requiring you to hold the bikes from falling as you move it away and requiring you to lift the weight of the bikes back up. The design of the Glide keeps the weight of the bikes at the same height so you are only pushing and pulling the weight (not holding and lifting).

Tom
Tom
5 years ago

a nice idea, but it looks like the bikes are sticking way out there, concerns about the bikes becoming a bumper.

TBird
TBird
5 years ago
Reply to  Tom

I think they are using a hitch adapter in the side shots with bikes on, which puts the whole rack out a lot further from the car. I’m sure on a normal hitch it will sit closer to the vehicle.

Gillis
Gillis
5 years ago
Reply to  Tom

How is that any different than any other hitch-mounted rack?

TomM
TomM
5 years ago

People still buy top-tube hanger racks?

rosey
rosey
5 years ago
Reply to  TomM

Not me! Top tube hanging racks SUCK!

Crash Bandicoot
Crash Bandicoot
5 years ago
Reply to  TomM

Shocking that they’re even made when you consider the top tube is he weakest tube on the bike and with compact frame sets they’re a mess. Küat is so much smoother and you can lower the rack with a kick

Anita
Anita
5 years ago
Reply to  TomM

So the “head engineer” who rides full sus mtbs won’t be using this rack on his vehicle. All the tri dorks and their Cervelo P5Xs will also get left behind.

FFM
FFM
5 years ago

At 3:35… Hard to trust a rack company that can’t figure out a Thule Apex.

Michael
Michael
5 years ago
Reply to  FFM

Can’t lower it with 3 large shopping bags in hand is the point…

FFM
FFM
5 years ago
Reply to  Michael

Can’t do much of anything with three bags in your hand other than be a grown-up and set them down before tackling your next task.

Michael
Michael
5 years ago
Reply to  FFM

Until you find a product with which you don’t have to set them down.

JBikes
JBikes
5 years ago

Really smart design for this style of rack.

Tom
Tom
5 years ago

I’m not a big bumper rack guy, but BJ (design engineer) FTW!

Now get to work on something similar for tray-style, no-touch racks!

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