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Scott stops stretch with new Zero Loss cycling shoes with Carbitex

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A lot of emphasis is put on the stiffness of the sole of your cycling shoe. But if the upper stretches when you’re really putting down the power, the shoe is only as good as the weakest link. That’s why Scott teamed up with Carbitex to to create a new type of upper. It’s made from carbon – but it’s also flexible. And while flexible, Scott claims it has virtually zero elongation, which should make the shoes very, very efficient.

Scott Zero Loss cycling shoes use Carbitex so you don't lose any power
Scott RC Ultimate MTB
Scott Zero Loss cycling shoes use Carbitex so you don't lose any power
Scott RC Ultimate Road

Scott Zero Loss cycling shoes use Carbitex so you don't lose any power Scott Zero Loss cycling shoes use Carbitex so you don't lose any power

Offered in both road and MTB variants, the MTB RCs were co-developed with World and Olympic champion Nino Shurter.

Scott Zero Loss cycling shoes use Carbitex so you don't lose any power
Scott RC SL MTB
Scott Zero Loss cycling shoes use Carbitex so you don't lose any power
Scott RC SL Road

Scott Zero Loss cycling shoes use Carbitex so you don't lose any power Scott Zero Loss cycling shoes use Carbitex so you don't lose any power

Compared to the MTB RC SL and the RC SL Road, the Ultimates (at the top) feature strategically placed strips of the Carbitex CX6 carbon material rather than the full panels on the SLs which seems like it would offer slightly better power transfer. On the mountain side, both shoes have the same claimed weight of 330g. But for road, the RC SL will save you 10g per shoe over the RC Ultimate.

All of the models use an ultra stiff HMX 10 carbon fiber outsole with a breathable, welded airmesh upper, 3D Shaped EVA tongue, and the Carbitex CX6 upper reinforcement and Boa IP-1 dials for fit. Inside you’ll find Scott’s Adjustable Ergologic insole system, and the mountain bike outsoles run EVA Sticki rubber for grip. Pricing is set at $450 for the RC Ultimates and $500 for the RC SLs.

scott-sports.com

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dustytires
5 years ago

If all that carbony blackish stuff if mesh, actually screen like, the air flow on these will be AWESOME. Bummer they put the Boa dials on the side though, I have personally seen a couple rides ruined with buckles being smashed against rocks.

myke2241
myke2241
5 years ago
Reply to  dustytires

I personally have never seen a boa dial destroyer and have have many pairs of shoes with them.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
5 years ago
Reply to  myke2241

I’ve seen a few destroyed. I’ve only sold hundreds of them…
I’ve crashed pretty darn hard on mine without breaking them but I have broken two regular buckles.

Amnon Israeli
Amnon Israeli
5 years ago
Reply to  Veganpotter

agree!
it should be at the middle

Volsung
Volsung
5 years ago
Reply to  dustytires

I have older Pearl Izumi X-Projects that are like 40% mesh on the top. It’s great but I get a lot of dirt in them. It doesn’t look like they make them like that anymore.

Collin S
Collin S
5 years ago
Reply to  dustytires

I somehow snagged a boa dial on a barrier in CX and the dial completely broke off the shoe, left me with zero tension. When you’re used to being strapped in, it really slows you down/zaps your confidence around anything rough. On a separate pair of shoes also with a boa, I actually had something similar happen on a run up. There was some root or rock that caught it and just popped it open. Luckly that one didn’t break so once I jumped back on, I was able to push it close and spin it tight. I personally like Sidi’s technobuckles way better. Since they are much more rounded/streamlined, there’s nothing for objects to grab. I’ve never had issues with my Dragons.

Jason
Jason
5 years ago

I have had the boa part pop out of the fitting on a specialized s works of mtb shoes. Rubbed up against a rock or root. Popped back into the fitting of the shoe no problem.

blah blah blah
blah blah blah
5 years ago

whats the point of a shoe that will never give to the shape of your foot, its like one of those chastity pleasure/torture devices for your feet

Robin
Robin
5 years ago
Reply to  blah blah blah

Where is it stated or demonstrated that the shoes mentioned above won’t “give to the shape of your foot”? That’s almost assuredly a false assumption.

blah blah blah
blah blah blah
5 years ago

virtually zero elongation

Large D
Large D
5 years ago
Reply to  blah blah blah

Zero elongation does not mean the material will not form just that it will not stretch. Carbon weave is flexible.

TheKaiser
5 years ago
Reply to  Large D

I agree that that material is flexible, and can form around the foot to some degree, but without stretch it is more limited in the complexity of the shapes it can assume, no? I would guess that is why they don’t seem to have used it on the toe box, as there are too many complex curves there. You can get this stuff to wrap around a cylinder beautifully, but you aren’t going to wrap it around a ball with out a lot of folds and creases, whereas a material with stretch can wrap (most of the way) around a ball, if you work it enough.

Having said all that, this material may be great in the spots Scott have used it. If they have ended the material before the ball of the foot you won’t need to worry about pressure at the outside of the 1st and 5th MT joint. There may be some people with issues on the top of the foot at the Medial Cuneiform bump, depending on how prominent theirs is and the exact location relative to the shoe sections. Really there are people who have that problem even in leather or Lorica shoes too, if the straps are located in such a way that they concentrate pressure on that spot.

Robin
Robin
5 years ago
Reply to  TheKaiser

I think it’s likely the case that the CF is only being used where the topology of the foot/shoe is less complex. Scott’s been making shoes (or having shoes made) for a while. It’s hard to see them producing a shoe without insuring that fit was proper.

With that said, the article clearly does not say what the CF material is made from. I’m betting that there are other materials that maximize its ability to conform to a human foot.

JBikes
JBikes
5 years ago

efficiency improvement?

Carl
Carl
5 years ago

It seems from the text and photos that the material has been placed in a way that acts like a strap to hold the foot down. No need for it to make up more than a small portion of the upper nor does it need to conform to the foot in more than one direction.

The idea seems to be that the shoe can have the stiffest sole in the world but that only helps when stomping down. When pulling up on the pedal there’s a lot of power loss.

JBikes
JBikes
5 years ago
Reply to  Carl

Nobody really “pulls up”, except maybe during the initial sprint phase or at very low cadence on a steep inclines. In this case, most higher-end cycling shoes won’t make much of a difference as they are all pretty “stiff” in that regards.

A stiff upper serves to keep ones foot on the sole comfortably (i.e. try playing basketball in sandals, even if the soles are identical to one’s actual basketball shoes). as well as support/constrain the structure of the foot to prevent injury and fatigue, it can even guide motion such as over-pronation. Too loose/flexible and it won’t do this. Too stiff and it won’t conform to a foot that does and will move around through a pedal stroke (it is afterall, a very dynamic structure comprised a many joints)

Jonny the Legs
Jonny the Legs
5 years ago
Reply to  JBikes

Nobody really pulls up? Err where are getting your info from – clearly not a cyclist that climbs sprints or does time trials to any decent level – total nonsense.

Matt
Matt
5 years ago

Horizontally compliant and vertically stiff?

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