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Shimano clips in with new BMX & Explorer SPD, 105 SPD-SL pedals

Shimano Explorer gravel road adventure touring bike pedals
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With the last Dura-Ace R9100 refresh and this summer’s new XTR M9100, Shimano has updated their top-of-the-line pedals for better overall performance. But most of the same pedal updates now trickle down to more affordable pedals including 105 road, a new clipless BMX, and two single sided Explorer pedals for everything from gravel riding to touring.

Shimano single-sided Explorer SPD gravel & tour pedals

Shimano Explorer gravel road adventure touring bike pedals

Shimano improved stability with wider & lighter platforms in their top road & trail pedals, but they also worked to optimize the interface specifically with their S-Phyre road & trail shoes. Now those same improvements come to their Explorer line as well.

Seen as a do-it-all setup for road, gravel & adventure touring, the Explorer shoe line offers much of the benefit of mountain bike setups – walkability & tolerance to getting dirty – with a look that blends in on the road. We’ve been really happy with the affordable Explorer RT4 & RT5 shoes for everything from commuting to touring over rough roads, and now they finally get two sets of one-sided SPD pedals that match their blend of on- and off-road performance.

Shimano Explorer gravel road adventure touring bike pedals

The larger bodied Explorer EH500 pedal gets a wide platform on one side with 8 adjustable / replaceable traction pins for good wet traction. On the other side a single SPD retention mechanism sits up high enough that it shouldn’t interfere with any shoe tread. Called a light action pedal, they still get release tension adjustment and weigh 383g per pair.

Shimano says these pedals mesh best with their sneaker style CT or mountain bike style MT shoes, but they will likely work well with any walkable soled clipless shoe.

Shimano Explorer gravel road adventure touring bike pedals

The smaller Explorer ES600 pedal is more of a mountain style SPD trimmed down into a proper road pedal body – even getting the designation of a mixed-surface Ultegra-series pedal. Again you get single-sided entry and good clearance of dirt, but the other side is slimmed down for a low-profile and cornering clearance.

Shimano Explorer gravel road adventure touring bike pedals

That makes these the lightest SPD pedals that Shimano produces, at just 279g for the pair. Again an adjustable, light-action retention mechanism makes these ideal for road touring paired with Shimano’s walkable RT shoes.

Shimano BMX DX-R SPD pedals

Shimano DX-R BMX SPD clipless pedals

The new MX70 BMX pedals look strikingly similar to the most recent XT M8020 Trail pedals.  That’s probably no coincidence as they likely share the same pedal body and overall construction.

Shimano DX-R BMX SPD clipless pedals
What is different though is that these BMX race-ready pedals get stiffer springs for a higher retention strength, and have a narrower release angle than regular SPD mountain bike pedals. So if you have issues with unclipping when you don’t want to these could be a solid trail alternative as well. The new BMX pedals offer dual-sided retention, a broad base for control when not clipped in, and weigh in at 414g for the pair.

Shimano 105 SPD-SL affordable lightweight carbon road pedals

Shimano 105 SPD-SL affordable lightweight carbon road pedals

Last but not least is the new 105 SPD-SL pedal, an extension of the new R7000 105 groupset update earlier this year. With pretty much the same overall design and similar injection-molded, carbon reinforced resin construction as the Dura-Ace pedals, these are likely to offer almost exactly the same level of performance as their more expensive siblings.

At just 265g per pair they shed 25g off the old 105 pedals, and are now just 37g heavier than Dura-Ace. They feature a similar stainless steel reinforced wide cleat contact area and spin on sealed cartridge bearings and a steel axle.

Bike.Shimano.com

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16 Comments
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msironen
4 years ago

The EH-500s look like decent replacement for the venerable A530s, only problem is my A530s aren’t really in any need of replacing. The increased grip thanks to the pins might just make them worth it if just for the winter commuting, though…

Ricky Bobby
Ricky Bobby
4 years ago
Reply to  msironen

Agree on all counts, specifically that I’ll probably never need to replace my A530s. I’ve often considered drilling/tapping my 530s to add traction pins, maybe I’ll do that now.

Adem
Adem
4 years ago
Reply to  msironen

Having gone from the unpinned PD-T780 to the pinned PD-T8000, the pins make a MASSIVE difference in grip when the pedals are wet. The PD-EH500 is definitely a worthwhile upgrade to Shimano’s lineup.

Victor Barra
4 years ago
Reply to  Adem

totally agree..

I have the same problem, my PD-T780 have 20.000+ km of touring and no need to replace besides the upgrade to the pinned version.

brs.one
brs.one
4 years ago
Reply to  Victor Barra

Carefully drill/tap? ;^P

MaraudingWalrus
MaraudingWalrus
4 years ago

That ES600 looks like an alternative to the Ritchey Micro WCS pedal – I have a couple sets and love them. Interesting to see Shimano do one, as well.

tech9
4 years ago

Explorer ES600 are perfect looking Gravel Grinder pedals.

dontcoast
dontcoast
4 years ago
Reply to  tech9

true, until you grab it for a CX race

JohnK
JohnK
4 years ago

Any pins on the “flat” side of the ES600? Thanks

FFM
FFM
4 years ago

The ES600 looks like it hangs nose down when idle. This is my nightmare.

stinkyhelmet
4 years ago

FFM, I think the ES600 might actually hang nose up….the spring and other bits look heavier than the nose. Hope so at least. Would be a major fubar if not.

MaraudingWalrus
MaraudingWalrus
4 years ago
Reply to  stinkyhelmet

The Ritchey Micro WCS pedals that I have are a similar shape; they hang nose up.

TL
TL
4 years ago

Are you sure that PD-R7000 come with cartridge bearings? The manual says otherwise.

typevertigo
typevertigo
4 years ago

Only real downside to this announcement is that the EH500 pedal requires the proprietary TL-PD40 tool to service its bearings.

Yes, the TL-PD40 is a cheap tool, but not everyone (especially outside the US) knows about it or knows where to get it. The more premium pedals’ spindles have metal flats which can simply be loosened by a wrench. Try that on the pedals that require the TL-PD40 and you usually end up damaging the spindle, as the splined sleeve is made of plastic.

Ricky Bobby
Ricky Bobby
4 years ago
Reply to  typevertigo

Or some Channel-locks.

bubblesm1
bubblesm1
4 years ago
Reply to  Ricky Bobby

Yup, plier wrenches like that work. I use Knipex cobras, the jaw width is narrower and grips better than channel locks.

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