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SOC15: Marin Celebrates 30 Years with 27+ Pine Mountain 1, Four Corners Touring Rig, Plus Vintage Collection

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Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (11)

Between Marin’s booth and the Subaru exhibit, vintage bike nerds should have had a great time at Sea Otter. While Sea Otter was celebrating 25 years, Marin was pushing the big 30 going back to the days when Joey Murray was the original product manager for projects like the first Madrone Trail (which was on display). Thirty years later, Marin is once again working with Joe Murray and the brand has a few new bikes in the works like the plus sized Pine Mountain series.

Starting with the Pine Mountain 1, Marin is toeing the waters with a fully rigid plus sized bike, but this is just the beginning…

Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (13)

Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (17) Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (12)

Shown in prototype form, the first Pine Mountain will be very close to the bike here including the suspension corrected rigid fork. Expect to see an additional brace across the top of the fork for production as well as side mounts on the legs however. Completely suspension ready, the Pine Mountain 1 will include Schwalbe tires instead of the Vee Tire co rubber pictured and utilized a chromoly frame and fork.

Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (15)

Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (16) Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (14)

Running quick releases front and rear, Marin’s first plus sized bike will not use boost standards but a typical 135mm rear and 100mm front. Fitted with a number of additional bosses for three bottle cages, under top tube fittings for frame bags or other accessories, the geometry is suited to aggressive trail riding but the accouterments will lend themselves to getting out into the back country. Fitted with an SLX 1×10 drivetrain with a SunRace 11-42 cassette, the 2016 Pine Mountain 1 will sell for $1100. If you like the looks of that, we’re told we should expect some similar, but higher spec’ed bikes this fall…

Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (4)

Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (6) Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (5)

Also in 4130 Chromoly but with much smaller tires, Marin’s new Four Corners should help you travel the globe. The sloping top tube frame includes clearance for up to 45mm tires with fenders, or clearance for 29 x 2.0″ knobby tires if you prefer dirt nomenclature.

Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (8) Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (10)

Built with provisions for fenders, racks, a rear stand, and three bottle cages, the Four Corners should leave some room for your Marin Brewing Co. suds. Equipped with short drop bars with a 20 degree outward flare, the Sora 3×9 build will sell for $1100 and will ship later this summer.

Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (21)

Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (24) Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (23)

Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (22)

Thirty years ago, this was it – the first Madrone Trail. Technically an ’86, this bike was built with Joe Murray geometry and sold for just $199.

Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (25)

Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (29) Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (27)

Moving on in noteworthy-ness, the 1990 Team Marin included Tange Prestige tubing and “Boasts Super Narrow Rims and a full Shimano XT STI group.” Yes, “Super Narrow Rims” used to be a selling feature.

Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (41)

Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (42)

The Titanium FRS frame from 1993 explored the world of full suspension with an Answer/Manitou rear fork built into the frame.

Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (30)

The Titanium FRS got a little more sophisticated in 1996, with a rocker suspension and a whopping 5.3″ of rear travel.

Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (35)

Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (38) Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (39)

Also in ’96, the Nail Trail rode on a 7000 series double butted aluminum frame with a Shimano STX/STX-RC drivetrain.

Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (32)

Marin bikes 30th anniversary 27 plus pine mountain four corners touring (40)

1998 started the Quake series with the 5.0 with its aluminum monocoque frame which eventually led to bikes like the Quake CL7 below. We’ve come a long way in 30 years – who knows what bikes will look like in 2045?

marinbikes.com

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-s
-s
7 years ago

Always thought that old Marins were great looking bikes. The new Pine Mountain captures that old style well.

mudrock
mudrock
7 years ago

I had a Pine Mountain 15 yrs ago or so – had a ton of fun on that bike.

JBikes
JBikes
7 years ago

I understand why, but man, suspension corrected rigid frames and their accompanying forks look bad. Really bad.

jorge
jorge
7 years ago

that 1st bike looks sexy! makes me wanna go backpack and biketour!

and i wish i could buy a quality whole bike for $199

Pistolero
Pistolero
7 years ago

Both Marin and Kona are two awesome brands from the 90’s, that went through the toilet due to weird new frame decorations… Still, they are kept in high steem, unlike trek or specialized; they still have the brand image almost intact, and they could do great products for a great price, competing with the handbuilt bikes, in a way… Shame they only do it in specific anyversary models, and not with their whole range.

phella
phella
7 years ago

I’ve got a Marin Team with that same wild 90’s paint. I use primarily as my city bike. Kids won’t steel a purple bike.

vincent
vincent
7 years ago

The new Pine Mountain is a great looking bike & that old Marin logo still looks fantastic! I would imagine it will make a solid 29er as well, with different hoops.

The article alluded to some higher spec versions due in the Fall. I would love to see one in titanium with a Fox 34 fork… maybe even SS ready?

I hope these sell well, I agree companies like Marin and Kona should keep a few ‘revised classics’ in their lineup. Simple steel bikes are still great for a lot of people!

my one nitpick-
It’s odd to see companies spec a larger cassette than a rear derailleur was designed to handle. Will they include a longer B-limit screw as well, or a One-Up RAD cage? I’ve found 11-42t to be a stretch on 10speed Shimano derailleurs. An 11- 40t works better. It’s nice to see 1x on an $1,100 bike – I just hope it’s not a compromise in shifting performance out of the box.

Don
Don
7 years ago

Single speed version of the Pine Mountain would be nice, as would thru-axles, just for compatibility with other wheels you might have… Looks like a nice bike for the price though.

Andy
Andy
7 years ago

I am riding my Marin Four Corners from Pueblo,CO to Kansas City, MO as I write (currently in Ordway). Nothing beats the punishment this beast will take. Loaded with all my gear, it weighs in at over 65 lbs. When you need your bike to survive the tough terrain, endure, and get you over the finish line, Marin will pull you through.

Jeff
Jeff
7 years ago

More braze-on eyelets on the Pine Mountain fork, please!

Jeff
Jeff
7 years ago

Also, please change the cable routing on the Pine Mountain to accommodate full cable housing on the front derailleur. It looks like there’s a cable stop, and since mud is thrown up by the front tire into the down tube, naked cable is totally untenable. The bottom of the downtime is by far the best place for front derailleur, rear derailleur, and chainstay-mounted disc brakes, because it allows you to shoulder the bike and doesn’t interfere with downtube bottle bosses at all. It also looks nicer than any other cable routing out there, save for internal routing, which has its own issues, such as being somewhat challenging to assemble 🙂

I am really interested in both of these bikes!

Jeff
Jeff
7 years ago

I think it’d also be nice to have fully enclosed brake and shifter cable running along the bottom of the Four Corners’ downtube!

Marin Bikes
Marin Bikes
7 years ago

@ Jeff- The Pine Mountain fork will have bosses for racks, as well as a cross brace for fender/mudguard mounting. Also a 3rd bottle cage mount on the DT. Just not present on this prototype bike from Sea Otter.

Glad you like them!!

Red Hilaro
Red Hilaro
7 years ago

I ride the Eldrige Grade 1994 Marin here in the Philippines for more than 20 years now – its still awesome!

Red Hilario
Red Hilario
7 years ago

Great bikes! GOD bless Marin USA !

Jeff
Jeff
7 years ago

Any update on availability of the Pine Mountain?

Chris
Chris
5 years ago

Had an 1988 Tange prestige/ Shimano Deore Pine Mountain – my first decent ride!

PETER M SHERMAN
PETER M SHERMAN
2 years ago

i have an old pine mountain that looks a whole lot like the nail trail bike in the photos above. Any way i can get more info on that bike? i am assuming it’s about early 1990s but really can’t say. any info, feel free to write me at psherman888@msn.com thanks all… great views of great classics.

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