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Swift’s new Hinterland Collection, plus new Roanoke modular backpack pannier

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This holiday season I’ve been taking it easy, and slow biking on touring bikes, taking in the roads and trails less traveled. While I haven’t decided to give up on riding fast, it has rekindled the thought that strapping bags to a bike and going on some extended trips might be a good idea. That had me looking through my inbox and seeing things like Swift Industries’ new Hinterland Collection, which includes a randonneur bag, small panniers, a lantern, a camp cup, and a knife, and their simple Roanoke backpack conversion that makes their panniers easier for everyday use…

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The Hinterland Collection has pretty straightforward intentions. Get on your bike. Ride a bit further than you had planned, but be prepared. The $230 Ozette Randonneur Bag claims to be the lightest rando bag out there, and is available in 3 sizes from 10.5-15.5l depending on your headtube length and packing needs. They feature an internal bungee system to keep your gear inplace and organized inside.

The Junior Ranger panniers are a small light option for packing with a low center of gravity at 10l a piece and sell for $260 for the pair. Both sets of bags are made-in-house from Swift’s durable X-Pac fabric and are kept light and water resistant (the seams aren’t taped, but the fabric is waterproof.) The other accessories are sourced by Swift from trusted partners to help push you a bit off the beaten path.

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The matching $20 camp mug is enameled steel and made in Poland for either your #coffeeoutside or #bourbonoutside needs. A $20 candle lantern will keep the party going even after your smart phone screen dies and there is more coffee bourbon to drink. The $250 camper knife is a bit more spendy, but if you are already spending 500 bucks on the bags, why not? It’s local forged in Seattle and should last a lifetime.

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The Roanoke Backpack Pannier setup is pretty similar to the straps on the Thule Chasm duffel bag we reviewed a couple of months back. And that’s mostly a good thing. We were very happy with the flexible usability of that bag, but were just a bit concerned with the way the straps hook into small webbing loops on the bag. The Roanoke does the same thing, but looks like the small plastic hooks are maybe a bit deeper, so a little more secure? It does attach the shoulder straps at the top with secure hooks, so at least there are less points to slip.

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But our concern here would be more those metal brackets that hook the bag to the rack. Swift assures us that the pannier hooks don’t actually touch your back when it is in use, so we’ll have to take their word on that. And at $180, we’ll trust that they have it sorted.

The Roanoke lets you select either their 15l or 30l pannier for the setup, with either getting a closed cell foam padded back for comfortable use. Out of a set of bags the Roanoke is a non-driveside bag, so chain grease won’t be an issue, but even with full coverage fenders this isn’t a backpack you’ll want to use with clothing that can’t handle a little dirt.

BuiltBySwift.com

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mudrock
mudrock
7 years ago

Holy Sh1t those bags are pricey. And 250 for the knife? My advice – save some cash on cheaper bags so you don’t have to tour in flannel.

Base
Base
7 years ago

Thats really expensive kit…. for bags check besides Vaude or Otlrieb http://crosso.pl/en/ Same kind of bags, more durable, waterproof and a lot less expensive…

For a real world tested kit, check http://bicycle-junkies.com/

If it needs to be different, check http://www.carradice.co.uk/ who makes very good bags from duck cotton.

Cheers.

Bas

teddy westside
teddy westside
7 years ago

Im not sure how every time it needs to be pointed out that HAND MADE IN THE USA COSTS MORE. Swifts quality is unbelievably good not to mention you get to chose your colors in most cases. Theres a huge difference in style as well. You guys are sort of like a person who owns a Crux telling someone with a custom made steel cross bike that it costs too much, different ball game folks.

Kernel Flickitov
Kernel Flickitov
7 years ago

Have both Swift and Ortlieb bags and biggest difference is Swift being about half the weight. For that very reason my Ortlieb have been relegated to commuting and Swift for randonneuring and longer tours.

teddy weststide is absolutely right, and I’m also willing to be that neither Base or mudrock have zero experience with Swift bags. Can’t just look at a price and say ‘too expensive’ if you don’t know what you’re talking about.

e.p.
e.p.
7 years ago

I have a set of swift junior ranger panniers and I absolutely love them. The build quality is exceptional. I’ve used them for both light touring and commuting. zero complaints.

Johnny
Johnny
7 years ago

Why on Earth would someone put bag weight on the front wheel before loading the rear wheel? It’s just wrong, I can easily visualize a slight overuse of a front brake and things going oh-oh on a steep descent. Don’t do it, kids.

Rider X
Rider X
7 years ago

@Johnny – the bike is a soma grand randonneur, which has a low trail front geometry meant for frontloading as you see there. Frontloading has a lot of advantages in how the bike handles if you have a frame with the proper geometry. For example you can climb out of the saddle very similar manner as you can with an unloaded bike, you can’t do that easily with a rear loaded bike. 20 pounds on the back is not going keep you from going over the handlebars if you don’t know how to position your weight when braking.

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