Home > Bike Types > Gravel Bikes

Thesis rolls out OB1 gravel frameset module + RidersClub for crash replacement at cost

22
Support us! Bikerumor may earn a small commission from affiliate links in this article. Learn More

Since their introduction, Thesis has been focused on creating the ultimate consumer-direct gravel bike. That meant sourcing as many of their own components as possible to offer a complete carbon bike with carbon wheels at an impressively low price. That complete bike still starts at just $2,999 in your choice of colors. But if you’re the type who would rather piece together your own build with parts you already own, that is finally an option.

Thesis OB1 frame module

Instead of going the traditional frameset route though, Thesis is still helping you get rolling with many of the components you’ll need to build up your bike. Calling it their frame module, the kit will include the frame, and fork (with all bolts and spare hardware), their Hollow-Light thru axles, a headset with stainless bearings, a thread-together bottom bracket with stainless bearings, their hollow forged alloy cranks and your choice of chainring, their Ultralight stem, 3D forged rigid seatpost, Compact Ergo Flare handlebar, and a spare derailleur hanger. All of this is included for $1,499 in your choice of five colors. Note that their bike builder also allows you to hand pick the sizing of all the components including handlebar width, stem length, crank length, and chainring size. It also give you the option of upgrading to a dropper post for an additional $149.

What doesn’t the frameset include? In order to build up your bike, you’ll need to provide a wheelset, tires, a drivetrain (minus the cranks), brakes, saddle, and some bar tape. The OB1 frame module takes care of most of the components that are frame-specific, allowing you to add things that might already be hanging around your spare parts bin.

What if you have everything except wheels and tires? Well, there’s an option to add on a wheel package too. An additional $1,199 will land your choice of 650b or 700c carbon Thesis wheels with DT Swiss hubs, an 11-42t Sunrace cassette, and choice of multiple WTB or Goodyear tires. Honestly, at this point, you might as well buy the whole bike for $200 more, unless you want to run a drivetrain other than SRAM Rival1.

RidersClub Crash Replacement

The other bit of news from Thesis is their new ‘RidersClub’ program. Reflecting the already low pricing on their bikes, the RidersClub will provide Thesis owners with at-cost crash replacement should your bike suffer the worst whether in a crash or driving it into your garage. This is provided to all Thesis owners, with help available by contacting support@thesis.bike.

thesis.bike

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

22 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
SomeGuy
SomeGuy
2 years ago

Or buy the frame (Carbonda CFR-505) direct and save a bunch of dough.

retro_slouch
2 years ago
Reply to  SomeGuy

Now THAT’s the “ultimate direct consumer-direct experience” we were promised!

Dirty Velocipede
Dirty Velocipede
2 years ago
Reply to  SomeGuy

Thesis has exclusivity on this frame, so it cannot be purchased directly from Carbonda.

Randall R. Jacobs | Thesis
Reply to  SomeGuy

Hey SG,

Good catch, and appreciate you chiming in here. Our OB1 frameset is indeed based on a heavily modified version of the CFR505, something we’ve always made the effort to be transparent about. However, there’s a lot more to that story, including the investments we’ve made in quality control and the exclusivity we’ve been granted by Flybike (the factory behind Carbonda) as part of our partnership with them.

Every frame we bring in is put through a rigorous quality control process to ensure that fit and finish are up to our perfecting standards. Rather than having the factory handle quality control and paint, we bring unpainted frames to our own facilities for a detailed inspection. This allows us to catch issues early, before they end up hidden by paint. Often, some finishing work is required to make sure the fitment and tolerances of our bikes is brought up to our exacting standards. Frames that don’t make the cut are rejected and returned to the factory.

Frames that pass our first round of quality control will have every component interface checked to make sure it’s within our precise tolerances. Brake mounting surfaces are faced to prevent you from dealing with the frustration of a squawking brake caliper that can never be perfectly aligned. Bottom bracket tolerances are confirmed to ensure size and symmetry, preventing the dreaded creak from cropping up later in the life of the bike. Each frame’s dropout interfaces and spacing are checked to confirm alignment to maintain chainline and good tire clearance.

Note that our module includes a customizable assortment of high-quality components (described by James Huang as a “masterclass” in spec) that are guaranteed to work well together to ensure the outstanding value and ride experience we’re known for. It also comes with our warranty, support, and owner benefits like a 15% discount on parts, apparel, and accessories, at-cost crash replacement program, and community forum.

I hope this helps to illuminate the value we add for our riders. Feel free to post any other questions or feedback you may have, and thank you for the opportunity to engage.

Warmly,

– Randall, Thesis Bike

patrick
patrick
2 years ago

As a former mechanic that’s had to deal with returning frames and forks overseas, there’s definitely a LOT of benefit to this. I’m convinced one of the reasons generic groups offer to paint things so cheaply is to hide imperfections. That is not based on much evidence though.

threeringcircus
threeringcircus
2 years ago

What’s a “thread-together” bottom bracket? Is that just a typical BSA threaded BB?

Julio
Julio
2 years ago

It’s better and less frustrating to buy OEM frames direct from the manufacturer and customize them.

It is innocent to believe in the benefits and warranty programs offered by brands, their importers and distributors.

Carl
Carl
2 years ago
Reply to  Julio

You keep lawyers like me in business with that type of thinking.

Dylan Sutton
Dylan Sutton
2 years ago

@Randall any plans on including some 2x complete builds or will that only ever be possible with the ‘frame module’? Not everyone has gone ‘full ***’ on 1x, it just doesn’t make sense for loaded touring.

Randall R. Jacobs | Thesis
Reply to  Dylan Sutton

Hey Dylan – It’s in the pipeline for next year, amigo.

That said, I still generally recommend 1x for it’s simpler interface and maintenance, lower weight and cost, ability to have the front shifter actuate a dropper (game-changer for dirt), and the ease with which gearing can be customized for each rider and ride experience. For example, I run a 42T chainring with a 9-46T cassette on my 650Bs and a 9-39T cassette on my 700Cs, giving me massive 511% and 433% ranges, respectively. In both cases, I end up with a 51×11 equivalent overdrive gear and what for me is the optimal range for each ride experience, including bikepacking. We also offer chainrings down to 38T for those needing even more low-end, which paired with the 9-46 provides a still-plenty 47×11 equivalent top gear.

OK 2x partisans, let me have it 😉

jednobiegowiec
jednobiegowiec
2 years ago

“ability to have the front shifter actuate a dropper (game-changer for dirt),”

Errmmm… For MTB, yesh, but for gravel?

I do not recollect ever thinking to myself – I need dropper on my gravel bike.

Even whilst riding some MTB stuff…

Cheers!
I.

Tom
Tom
2 years ago
Reply to  jednobiegowiec

agree – if i truly need a dropper, I’m going to get rim strike on any tire less than 2.3″ wide

Randall R. Jacobs | Thesis
Reply to  jednobiegowiec

Hey Jed & Tom – I appreciate your skepticism. We actually produced a short tech segment on droppers as part of our collaboration with The Gravel Ride Podcast. Curious what you think. 😉

https://thesis.bike/blogs/thesis-bike-blog/listen-now-our-new-tech-tips-mini-series-with-the-gravel-ride-podcast

Naero
Naero
2 years ago

Now this is good marketing right there. Transparently shown what the brand has to offer. Well done!

Randall R. Jacobs | Thesis
Reply to  Naero

Appreciate the acknowledgement, Naero.

jednobiegowiec
jednobiegowiec
2 years ago

I still think, if you need dropper you are taking wrong bike for your riding.
Of course what suits you best, but I give it a miss.
Cheers!
I.

Carl
Carl
2 years ago

I can vouch for Randall. He is a legit bike industry guy with a lot of experience. When you buy a bike, even if open mold, or modified open mold, you aren’t just getting a frame. The benefit to buying a frame in the US is simply that it is the cheapest insurance policy you can buy. If anything goes wrong from product failure to personal injury, you have someone in the US to deal with, not someone overseas who won’t respond to emails. There are lawyers who specialize in this exactly. The straight from factory to consumer idea leaves out a lot of consumer protections. Randal is a solid dude too.

Randall R. Jacobs | Thesis
Reply to  Carl

Thank you for chiming in with your perspective and kind words, Carl. Have we met? If not, how did you learn about us and our approach?

Carl
Carl
2 years ago

The benefit of a threaded together bottom bracket is that micro frame defects that you wouldn’t normally otherwise notice, are gone. If you have ever seen a perfectly aligned bottom bracket installed, and the crankset installed, the crankset will spin like it is ceramic because the frame imperfections don’t throw things out of alignment. There are a ton of aftermarket BBs to fix it. Hambini talks about it in depth in one of his videos.

Chip Greaves
Chip Greaves
2 years ago

Not true, I bought one 2 years ago from Carbonda and love it.

joeconcra
2 years ago

So funny to read these comments. Folks we are talking about bicycles. I get the geeking out but the anger towards a company that is transparent and straight up with everyone? I bought my Thesis after meeting Randall precisely because he was wide open about all of the parts and the design. This bike has changed my riding experience and made my life on the bike more enjoyable. At the end of the day is that not what this is about. BTW I have had no issues with the bike other than wear and tear and if I ever have any questions Randall or one of their 4 employees answer them. It’s a bike…ride it.

Subscribe Now

Sign up to receive BikeRumor content direct to your inbox.

Subscribe Now

Sign up to receive BikeRumor content direct to your inbox.