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Trek Ditches Emonda And Goes All In On Madone With Builds up to $17k

Trek Madone Gen 8 close u p
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The Trek Madone Gen 8 takes inspiration from the Emonda and earlier Madone models to create a new “super-bike.” Think of it as a greatest hits album from the Trek Road technologies, but all gathered under the Madone name. The Madone Gen 8 combines two popular (and sometimes hard to choose from) Trek models now (light and fast) under a singular bike model. Trek makes the road bike buying decision easier for the customer and keeps Trek’s commitment to reducing overall SKUs by 40% by 2026.

Trek Madone Gen 8 SLR
(Image: Trek)

Trek Madone Gen 8 Overview 

Trek’s new Gen 8 Madone line looks like the “every bike” that companies are always searching for—a bike that can climb and sprint and has all the aerodynamics to satisfy the “free watt” counters. 

So, Did Trek Do It? 

On paper, the Madone Gen 8 is as light as the current Emonda SLR frameset and 320g lighter than the Madone. This weight reduction is due to an all-new level of Trek carbon dubbed “900 series OCLV Carbon.” 

Trek Madone Gen 8 SLR rear
(Image: Trek)

Trek says the new OCLV 900 Series Carbon is up to 20% stronger material than the previous 800 OCLV carbon. Treks’ new and more efficient molding processes use less material and save weight. Also, the new Madone Gen 8 uses a single-piece carbon fork, saving extra weight. Check that the box is accomplished. 

Trek Madone Gen 8 long bar view
(Image: Jordan Villella/Bikerumor)

Trek Madone Gen 8 Weights

Below is a full breakdown of each Trek Madone Gen 8 and its corresponding weight. No surprise, the lightest model is the Madone SLR 9 Gen 8 ($17K) at 15.55 lbs; the heaviest is the Madone Gen 8 SL5 at 19.18 lbs ($3,500). But the Madone Gen 8 story isn’t all weight; it’s a balance of weight, aerodynamics, and comfort—the trifecta of a well-rounded ride and something challenging to produce.

Trek Madone Gen 8 weights

(Image: Jordan Villella/Bikerumor)

How About Sprinting and Aerodynamics?

For the Madone Gen 8, Trek used different tube shapes and a “Full System Foil” aero design, a departure from the Kamtail Foil Trek previously used.

Trek Madone Gen 8 front view

(Image: Jordan Villella/Bikerumor)

Trek says the Madone Gen 8 is 77 sec/hr faster than Émonda and as fast as the previous Madone. So, it’s as fast as the current model but much lighter, giving the bike another dimension in climbing ability and agility.  

Trek Madone Gen 8 header

(Image: Jordan Villella/Bikerumor)

For this Madone, Trek opted for different tube shapes optimized for smaller and larger sizes. This ensures a balanced ride across sizes and a more proportional aesthetic.

Improved IsoFlow Technology

A key takeaway from the Madone Gen 7 is the IsoFlow technology. Madone Gen 8’s updated IsoFlow technology is lighter and provides 80% more vertical compliance than before. Remember, this isn’t actual travel; it’s more like mirco-small-bump-compliance, and it’s a notable difference in comfort while on slightly gravel/country road terrain.

New lighter-weight and more ergonomic bar/stem

The Trek Madone Gen 8 SLR models come with an updated Aero RSL Road Integrated Bar/Stem. The new cockpit is crafted from OCLV Carbon in “ultra-fast aero shapes” and has hoods that are 3cm narrower than the drops. 

Aero-accessories 

Some aero-help help comes from neatly integrated race day bottles, dubbed RSL Aero Bottles. The new bottles come with the SRL version of the Madone Gen 8 and are available separately. They offer enough water for a hot 60-minute crit, and the cages are compatible with traditional bottles in case you drop on trying to put it in (they are one-way bottles.) 

More Madone Gen 8 For the Masses 

The all-new Madone SL shares the same frame technology as the SLR model but keeps costs down. The Madone SL uses a more economical 500 Series OCLV Carbon and two-piece handlebar/stem combos. The Madone SL models range in price from $3,500 for the Madone SL 5 to $6,500 for the Madone SL7 (our test ride). 

Trek Madone Gen 8 Geo
(Image: Trek)

Trek Madone Gen 8 Geometry 

For the Madone Gen 8, Trek went for T-shirt sizing rather than traditional. This move to T-shirt sizing eliminates the smallest XXS and the largest XXL sizing, keeping XS, S, ML, L, and XL. The frame sizing sticks to a somewhat “normal” sizing chart. The most pivotal sizing: M has a 54.5, and the ML has a 55.7 effective top tube. 

Trek Madone Gen 8 logo

(Image: Jordan Villella/Bikerumor)

Welcome H1.5

If you’re a Trek rider, you already know about H1 and H2 sizing. H1 is a “professional” race fit, and H2 is a little palatable for the non-pro and all around rider. Now, Trek is combining the fitting and ushering in H1.5 – a combo of the two offerings. Trek says the new Madone has the same drop shape as the Gen 7 Madone and is still 3cm narrower on hoods than drops.

Trek Madone Gen 8 udh

(Image: Jordan Villella/Bikerumor)

Trek Madone Gen 8 Pricing 

The new Trek Madone Gen 8 is available in nine different complete bike models (four Madone SL models and five SLR models) and two frameset options. The models start a race-ready $3,500 price point and grow to a “Who is this for?”  $17,000 Project One offering. 

Trek Madone Gen 8 Full Pricing

(Image: Jordan Villella/Bikerumor)

All bikes are either SRAM or Shimano builds with Bontrager wheels and components. The Madone SLR bikes have Trek RSL Aero-Cages, and RSL bar stem combos. The Madone SL models have a Bontrager (proprietary) aero stem and bar combo. 

Look for a full review as we get more time under the monster, and look for the Lidl-Trek and the new Madone SLR at the Tour de France.

Madone Gen 8 will be available globally at select Trek retailers and online at trekbikes.com.

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TheStansMonster
TheStansMonster
16 days ago

If you’re a Trek rider, you already know about H1 and H2 sizing. H1 is a “professional” race fit, and H2 is aero and drop. Now, Trek is combining the fitting and ushering in H1.5 – a combo of the two offerings. Trek says the new Madone has the same drop shape as the Gen 7 Madone and is still 3cm narrower on hoods than drops.

This section makes me feel like English isn’t my first language.

Lorelei
Lorelei
16 days ago

News flash. The 1.5 geometry has been on the bikes for a few years now. There is no more H1 & H2(technically an H1 still exists, but I believe it’s overstock).

Lorelei
Lorelei
16 days ago
Reply to  Lorelei

Sorry @thestansmonster the news flash was for Bike Rumor.

Michael
Michael
15 days ago
Reply to  Lorelei

ChatGPT, is that you?

RXKNephew
RXKNephew
16 days ago

Check that the box is accomplished.

John
John
16 days ago

seems most of the aero gains are from the water bottles, something you could have on any bike last year from cannondale

Lorelei
Lorelei
16 days ago
Reply to  John

Their cages are shaped very differently and are meant to have little space between them(1cm). Effectively, the bottom half of the triangle becomes a fairing. I imagine these are going to be ridiculously expensive though. Ya know… r&d and all that…

John
John
15 days ago
Reply to  Lorelei

probably. The cannondale regrip aero cage and bottle was like $31 a pop, and did the same fairing thing to my sl7. The frameset alone is more expensive than a sworks sl8 frameset

Greg
Greg
15 days ago
Reply to  Lorelei

$100/ bottle & cage combo

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
4 days ago
Reply to  Greg

I bet they offer plastic cages for about $30 and carbon for +$60 each. I may very well buy this bike but I want nothing to do with those tiny bottles and they seem to work with normal bottles but they don’t sit all the way into the cages.

greg
greg
16 days ago

$9500 for a Force build?!?. $13k for DA??

Argon 18 Sum Pro w/ DA is $9000…that leaves $4k for training

Nice paint though!

Collin S
Collin S
16 days ago
Reply to  greg

Most brands have walked backed some of their crazy Covid tax increase from a few years ago. Trek and Specialized….hold my beer. I guess every brand pushes the envelope on the Dentist (or orthodontist?) bike.

The $3500 model isn’t horrible (but not great). The Scott Foil RC30 is almost equal to SL6 (105 di2) but the trek does come with carbon wheels for $500 more so I’d say that one is in line. The Frameset price on the SL really doesn’t make sense. You could buy a fully built bike for the same price and the conversion rates are all different on the frame vs the bikes.

Dave
Dave
15 days ago
Reply to  Collin S

Loved my Wilier over the years. Zero 7, Filiante. Two of the nicest bikes I have even owned.

RXKNephew
RXKNephew
16 days ago
Reply to  greg

Yeah if I’m spending over $15k I better be getting that Wilier with Super Record, not a Trek with Sram (to be clear, I am not spending $15k)

Dave
Dave
15 days ago
Reply to  RXKNephew

I wouldn’t spend my own money on an obscure brand with questionable development credibility (who even is Wilier?)and a virtually unsupported groupset over something that was designed in the US with great resources and global dealer support on the ready. But that’s just me…

Robin
Robin
15 days ago
Reply to  Dave

Wow. Just because you think Wilier is obscure doesn’t make it so. They’ve been in business as a bike company since 1906. Campy unsupported? Oh, where’s your evidence?

I like that people in comment sections will say the dumbest things, but couch their inane replies with things like, “But that’s just my opinion” or “But that’s just me”.

Uninformed opinions have no value.

Tom
Tom
15 days ago
Reply to  Robin

lighten up Francis

Dave
Dave
13 days ago
Reply to  Robin

I’m not uninformed. Wilier is a brand name that’s been bought and sold a few times. It’s “history” is full of achievements of men they’ve supplied with bikes to race but not much technology or innovation. Maybe they’ll get lucky with Cavendish and build onto their story a little more.

remembergoliad
remembergoliad
12 days ago
Reply to  Robin

No Campy group sets in the TDF this year, so they say.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
4 days ago
Reply to  Robin

I’ve sold plenty of Campy gear. While I wouldn’t say their customer service is terrible, it’s very bad considering what you’re paying for it. And it’s definitely worse than Shimano and SRAM.

tertius_decimus
tertius_decimus
15 days ago
Reply to  Dave

A typical ignorant American. Willier Triestina was literally 70 years ahead before Trek was even born. It’s a reputable Italian brand with rich history. But that’s just you…

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
4 days ago

I have no issue with Willier but they haven’t innovated a thing for decades until their new TT bike. Very similar to Colnago in that respect.

Diego
Diego
15 days ago
Reply to  Dave

Can you please re-read your comment, google Willier, and then laugh at yourself when you discover that is a brand way older and way more established than you know? And what does “designed in the US with great resources” even mean

Emilio
Emilio
15 days ago
Reply to  Dave

Trek is more abour Marketing $$$

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
4 days ago
Reply to  Emilio

Trek does plenty of marketing but they also do a lot of innovative things. They may not always work but they’re certainly putting in the R&D

Emilio
Emilio
15 days ago
Reply to  Dave

Trek is more about Marketing $$$

King County
King County
15 days ago
Reply to  Dave

@David, That was the goofiest comment about a bike brand I’ve ever read, even for the internet. That had to be a sarcastic post.

Dino
Dino
14 days ago
Reply to  Dave

@Dave listen to me fat American pos. cycling existed before lance armstrong.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
4 days ago
Reply to  RXKNephew

I wouldn’t ride Super Record if they paid me to ride it. The Wilier is OK

John
John
15 days ago
Reply to  greg

not to mention $6000 for just the frameset! That’s $500 more than the sworks sl8!

greg
greg
15 days ago
Reply to  greg

they can only get to 7.05kg for the “lightest” build.

My soloist (56cm) is 7.36kg with Enve 6.7, Assioma pedals, cages and garmin mounts. Minus pedals it’s basically the same weight!!

Built it myself for less than half the price of this bike. ~$6800

Not impressed…but the paint IS killer.

Dinger
Dinger
2 days ago
Reply to  greg

I don’t think these examples are the lightest builds, just a a stock premium build with mid-depth rims and 28mm tires. I would imagine someone buying a bike at the highest price levels would use Project 1 where paint finish and component spec can be specified. With those options one could choose the lighter, lower profile wheels and narrower, lighter tires and possibly other lighter component options, if light weight is the highest priority.

John
John
16 days ago

Between the stack heights on these things and the price…I’ve come to the conclusion that cycling isn’t for everyone; especially me. I’ll always ride bikes though…just not in the pro tour larping sense of it. All the more power to those that can swing it though.

Dinger
Dinger
2 days ago
Reply to  John

Most brands offer bikes with more relaxed fits (usually marketed as “Endurance” geometry) that ride really well without giving up anything in technology or quality. Giant Defy, Specialized Roubaix, Trek Domane, Canyon Endurance, the list is long and the bikes are really good.

uzurpator
uzurpator
15 days ago

I don’t think I’ve spent combined $17k on the 30-something bikes I owned in the last 20 years.

Oliver
Oliver
15 days ago
Reply to  uzurpator

According to the industry, that means you’re not a cyclist.

Evan
Evan
13 days ago
Reply to  uzurpator

Hoarder

Dinger
Dinger
12 days ago
Reply to  uzurpator

I’d be interested in what that list of bikes is. That’s about $566/bike. Good cost less but weren’t exactly cheap 20 years ago.

wwm
wwm
15 days ago

I’m not buying another Trek with a proprietary seat post. I will say that their customer support treated me very well and I appreciate that.

John
John
7 days ago
Reply to  wwm

Ya man, their customer service is kind and courteous but someone at trek figured it a good idea to not care replacement parts for bikes that are getting to the age of actually needing replacement parts. Ie, 2018 fuel main pivot hardware. Just seems wasteful to not support bikes with plenty of good use left in them.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
4 days ago
Reply to  John

My 4th gen Domane has been treating me well. But I’m certainly buying 2 sets of the internals for their ISOspeed bits. I’d like to get a good 200k miles on this like my last main bike

gibbon
gibbon
15 days ago

Missed opportunity by Terk, should have called it Onamed.

BillB
BillB
13 days ago
Reply to  gibbon

Or Daemon, perhaps…

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
4 days ago
Reply to  BillB

That’ll be for when the market stabilizes and they make another true aero bike

Sam
Sam
15 days ago

i love everything about this bike .. except that BIG HOLE ..

Troy
Troy
14 days ago

If you’re going to spend $17,000 on a bicycle, why not get a custom made bike? I think we all need to boycott the big brand bicycle business (the BBBB) they are and have been getting way out of line for the past decade or so. Their trajectory is like that of the stock market, exponential growth over a short period, in design and price, poised to crash any year now. Please lets just make it happen. Sorry to say, but stop purchasing bikes direct or from your LBS (unless it’s custom “not big brand”). Get your service done at your LBS, but even the BBB’s are screwing over their dealers by allowing direct online sales, one of the few things that separated the bicycle industry from other industries. Too many MBA’s running and ruining the show capitalizing on high-income earners with large disposable income. Bring back the small LBS, bring back the custom made frame builder.
Troy for bicycle world president.

I’m Troy, and I approve this message.

P.S. Screw Trek and Specialized. And essentially the rest of them. Buy from a brand you can put a face to, a brand where you can know your builder.

Support Humans not corporations!

Robin
Robin
13 days ago
Reply to  Troy

I think we all need to buy whatever bike we like and want, whatever bike will inspire us, whatever will keep us riding. I think people should buy a given bike for whatever reason that suits them. I think people should ignore what anyone else thinks or says about that.

Dinger
Dinger
12 days ago
Reply to  Troy

Trek and Specialized employ 1,000’s of humans with faces. A custom builder doesn’t have the resources to test the bike they build. If they tout “custom selected tubes for your weight”, it’s a guess made out of off the shelf tubes they didn’t design in the first place. That’s not to say a builder can’t build you a nice bike but it’s nothing like bikes like this.

Ben
Ben
11 days ago
Reply to  Dinger

They employ mainly lawyers and marketing peeps. Cycling would be better of with a couple less of those.

Dinger
Dinger
2 days ago
Reply to  Ben

“Mainly” lawyers and marketing people? Have you ever visited a bike company? How do you think things are made?

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
4 days ago
Reply to  Troy

A lot of people want the fastest bike out there. This may not be that but none of the custom builders are building aerodynamically competitive bikes.

threeringcircus
threeringcircus
14 days ago

I’m sure it’s a wonderful bike, but it’s also a lot of coin for something that is going to be “last year’s model” in about 6 months.

Fitness
Fitness
12 days ago

Welcome to the club. People don’t buy a new Ferrari knowing it’s going to be the latest and greatest after a year or two

Dinger
Dinger
2 days ago

Meh.. I wonder what the response to the article would’ve been if the headline instead included “builds starting at $3,499”. It’s a whole range of bikes, not just the most expensive ones.

Paolo
Paolo
11 days ago

17k€ for a bike over 7kg? Very very heavy! A 17k€ bike should be less than 6kg.

PoorInRichfield
PoorInRichfield
8 days ago

I didn’t think the new Madone “blow hole” seat post design would last past a single model year, yet here we are. I guess sometimes taking risks pays-off.

Robert
Robert
7 days ago

These SLR group models surely would have one piece stem – handlebar combinations as Factor , Canyon , BMC , Look , as well as Cannondale are using them . I even sell them as an upgrade option . I have adaptor sleeves for some brands .

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