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Trek’s new Émonda ALR mimics higher end carbon bikes w/ svelte aluminum frame

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Trek just unveiled a new aluminum road bike – but at first glance, you might mistake it for carbon. That’s because the new Émonda ALR uses a hydroformed 300 Series Alpha Aluminum frame that mimics a lot of the carbon look but at a more affordable price.

Trek's new Émonda ALR mimics higher end carbon bikes w/ attractive aluminum frame Trek's new Émonda ALR mimics higher end carbon bikes w/ attractive aluminum frame Trek's new Émonda ALR mimics higher end carbon bikes w/ attractive aluminum frame

Following similar lines to other Émonda frames, the hydroforming is combined with Trek’s “Invisible Weld Technology” to make the welds less noticeable. The frames are also designed to be quite light with a 1112g rim brake version and 1131g disc version in a 56cm. Designed with Trek’s H2 geometry, the bikes have an upright but still sporty fit.

Trek's new Émonda ALR mimics higher end carbon bikes w/ attractive aluminum frame

Available in both rim and disc brake versions, the rim brake model uses direct mount brakes, while the disc uses flat mount to take advantage of the latest standards. Both frames have internal cable routing, Duotrap sensor compatibility, a BB86.5 bottom bracket, and the disc brake model runs thru axles front and rear.

Trek's new Émonda ALR mimics higher end carbon bikes w/ attractive aluminum frame Trek's new Émonda ALR mimics higher end carbon bikes w/ attractive aluminum frame Trek's new Émonda ALR mimics higher end carbon bikes w/ attractive aluminum frame Trek's new Émonda ALR mimics higher end carbon bikes w/ attractive aluminum frame

Complete builds include 25mm tires, a full carbon fork, and a Shimano Tiagra or 105 drivetrain. Sold as the ALR 5 or ALR 4 in both rim and disc brake, the ALR 5 Disc also gets a women’s version. Pricing starts at $1,359.99 for the ALR 4 and goes up to $1,889.99 for the ALR 5 Disc in men’s or women’s. Framesets will also be available in rim or disc brake version for $959.99. Available now.

trekbikes.com

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17 Comments
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Boom
Boom
4 years ago

begejus, that purple looks good. Like an old Klein. Between this and the Madone, they’ve been doing some dang good looking bikes

Jeff
Jeff
4 years ago
Reply to  Boom

Agree!

Kyle
Kyle
4 years ago
Reply to  Boom

You mean copying Specialized’s Chamelon paint job of the last three years.

Mick
Mick
4 years ago
Reply to  Kyle

Read “Klein”

John
John
4 years ago
Reply to  Kyle

@Kyle: Trek copied a Klein design (which they own) and which came two decades before Specialized “Chameleon” paint jobs.

Gary
Gary
4 years ago
Reply to  Boom

RIP Klein – killed by Trek.

Dinger
Dinger
4 years ago
Reply to  Gary

Killed by market forces. Klein was special at its peak because of premium aluminum and paintjobs. By the end of their run, there was no longer anything special about those two things. Everybody wanted carbon fiber.

Kayce
Kayce
4 years ago

One of your competitors at least points out Trek provided frame weights without paint.

Kayce
Kayce
4 years ago
Reply to  Zach Overholt

https://www.bikeradar.com/road/news/article/trek-emonda-alr-52721/

First paragraph under the “Worth the Weight” heading. If they have it accurate, that is real shady from trek.

JBikes
JBikes
4 years ago
Reply to  Kayce

Yeah its shady as its done for marketing. But in reality, who
1) decides between two frames based on the weight of paint (say its 200g, which is on the heavy side I believe)
and
2) thinks paint weight affects their performance

I guess people do though or Trek wouldn’t have done it.

Within a “class” of bike i.e. sub 800g super frames, sub kilo or ~1200g frames, just buy the one that fits best and feels best to you. Actual performance between them based on weight alone is non existant. I’d even say that any road frame under 1600g (for the std 56) is “light” and its weight isn’t going to be a factor over other variables (fit/feel).

Ape Escape
Ape Escape
4 years ago

As a mechanic at a Trek dealer I would say those weights are accurate, and that’s with paint. However, having only a 25c tire clearance in this modern era is a deal breaker. As with most things, Trek, so far yet so far away….

Rustilicus
Rustilicus
4 years ago
Reply to  Ape Escape

“Only 25c tire clearance”? Nowhere does it say that, in fact they list the clearance at 28c and as usual with Trek that’s being conservative.

Crash Bandicoot
Crash Bandicoot
4 years ago
Reply to  Rustilicus

Doesn’t trek also factor in 6mm of space vs the industry standard of 4mm? I’ve never heard of anyone having issues running 28mm on pretty much anything trek including the madone.

JBikes
JBikes
4 years ago

Yes, trek uses 6mm. The rim is rated at 25mm at trek, but should easily clear 28 tires. The disc is rated at 28mm and so should likely be able to 32’s.

I’d think a mechanic at a Trek dealer would notice this, but given my experience with mechanics, its not surprising.

I recently asked about replacement disc pads at a major Trek/Spesh shop in the Denver area…a big biking location, and both mechanics said “Campagnolo doesn’t have a disc brake, are you sure you don’t mean rim pads”.

Eric Hancock (@eric_d_hancock)

“As a mechanic at a Trek dealer” you should know that is a very conservative figure and only for the rim brake model.

Nick
Nick
4 years ago

I fit 28c Schwalbe tires on the older version with non-direct-mount rim brakes, wouldn’t be surprised if the new model fits 28’s.

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