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Wearable tech lights you up and shows others where you’re going

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A A Visijax turn-action-closeup-commuter

We’re always looking for better ways to stick out in traffic and one thing that has always held true – “the brighter, the better”. LED technology has gotten smaller & brighter and Visijax took advantage of that and incorporated it into some wearable tech. What’s better, is that they’re not just a bunch of LED’s slapped on a cheap windbreaker.

Check out the award winning (yes, it won an award at CES), wearable tech from Visijax and some of the well thought out features…

Visijax tech
photos c. of Visijax

There aren’t many “hard-goods” someone hasn’t tried to stick some LEDs on, but when it comes to wearable “soft-goods”, (that usually require washing), reflective material is about as far as it’s gone. Visijax’s wearables have built in LEDs that are washing machine safe, (so as long as you remove the micro-USB rechargeable battery).We took a brief look at Visijax at a pre-Interbike sneak peek back in September and the jackets by themselves were pretty nice not even considering the tech built into them.

There are three settings operated by the built in switch. Quick flash, slow flash and constant, plus a fourth, rapidly flashing, mode to warn you of a low battery. Depending on what mode the jacket’s LED’s are used in the battery lasts up to about 20 hours. By using a household micro-USB cable, the battery charges in about 4 hours.

A Visijax City Ace Jacket

The City Ace Jacket (£149.99 / $212), incorporates 23 embedded high-intensity LEDs. The LEDs on the chest and tail stay on in the chosen mode, while the LEDs on the front & back of each arm flash when the rider raises their arm to indicate a turn. A fleece liner with a Teflon water resistant shell keeps you warm and protected from unwanted elements, but the zippered side vents let you regulate temps if things get steamy. Available in a dark teal or high-vis lime green, the City Ace Jacket includes zippered pockets front and rear and the front main zipper has their scan-able ICEid tag (see below).

The City Ace Features

  • Zipped front pockets
  • Zipped chest pocket
  • Zipped tail pouch
  • Internal pouch pocket
  • Adjustable toggle tighteners
  • Reflective Velcro cuffs
  • Dupont Teflon coating (so mud slides off easily)
  • Inner mesh lining
  • Zipped mesh side vents
  • Studded and flapped air vents
  • Reflective safety strips
  • Taped seams
  • Fleece collar
  • ICEiD Tag
  • Generous-cut sizing XS–XXL (see size chart)
  • Teal or Lime Green
  • 12-months warranty

A Visijax Commuter

The Commuter Jacket (£119.99 / $170), is made with the same LED configuration as the City Ace, but in a lighter build with mesh liner for warmer to cool days in the saddle.

Commuter Jacket Features:

  • Zipped front pockets
  • Zipped tail pouch
  • Internal phone pocket
  • Adjustable toggle tighteners
  • Reflective Velcro cuffs
  • Inner mesh lining
  • Reflective front zip
  • Reflective safety strips
  • Studded and flap air vents
  • Taped seams
  • Fleece collar
  • ICEid Tag to assist in an emergency
  • Generous-cut sizing XS–XXL (see size chart)
  • Black or Hi-Vis Yellow
  • 12-months warranty

A Visijax gilet back

The Visijax Gilet *fancy word for “vest”, (£79.99 / $113) has the same wearable LEDs sans turnsignals. With the same mesh liner as the Commuter Jacket, it has a zippered chest pocket and a mesh rear pocket for easy access.

Gilet Features

  • Zipped chest pocket
  • Reflective front zip
  • Inner mesh lining
  • Elasticated armholes detailed in black
  • Elasticated hem in black
  • Black mesh pouch pockets on rear
  • Taped seams
  • High collar
  • ICEid Tag to assist in an emergency
  • Close-fit sizing XS–XXL (see size chart below)
  • Black or Hi-Vis Yellow
  • 12-month warranty

SONY DSC

With each jacket as well as available separately (£9.99 / $14), the ICEid tag has a scan-able  QR code that you can list any emergency contact details and medical information for a a first responder to quickly access.

cesAward-Final LED-Accessories-hero

For a little extra street cred, they won an innovation award for “Wearable Tech” at CES 2015, (Consumer Electronics Show). Although the featured jackets above are pretty cool, Visijax also sells a wide range of workforce & emergency personal as well as backpacks and a belt that all light up.

Visijax.com

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Antipodean_eleven
6 years ago

Some good thinking going on here, though I’d like to see more exploration into the same ideas but not always embedded into jackets or bags; I’ve spent plenty of time in the dark needing no more than arm warmers at most.

My only big issue is, at least from the pics, none of it seems bight enough. My personal experience tells me it’s not until you go into the properly bright lumens territory that box tops start noticing you.

Gillis
Gillis
6 years ago

The also offer a LED “sports belt” for over the clothes. And I see a link above for a previous review of a wearable turn signal armband (different company).

As for your second comment, pictures of lights at night never do them justice, for better or worse. You’ll never know until you have it in hand how bright it’s going to be.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
6 years ago

Definitely impressive price points for what you’re getting

noway09909@gmail.com
noway09909@gmail.com
6 years ago

Thank you Visijak, not so much for the jacket (which is surely nice) but for hopefully ending the horribly idiotic way cyclists indicate right turns.

Pointing the direction you are going makes sense, for both left and right turns! Raising your arm, bent at the elbow at 45 degrees looks like your waving to someone. Car drivers don’t know what your doing or signaling. It’s a misinformed way of announcing a right turn that comes from when cars did not have turn signals. A car driver can only put their left arm out the window, so back in the day you pointed left to go left, and bent your arm up to go right.

But on a bike, your not enclosed, so simply pointing the direction you plan to turn makes sense and is safer for everyone.

Thank you, Visijak.

Gillis
Gillis
6 years ago

First, drivers are taught that a raised arm, bent at 90 (not 45) degrees is.
https://driversed.com/driving-information/driving-techniques/using-turn-or-hand-signals.aspx
They should understand this (not saying they will…). Second, if you’re signalling while moving, but perhaps covering or riding the brake, it’s much easier and safer to do so with the right hand on what it typically the rear brake.

Velociraptor
Velociraptor
6 years ago

You can make your own high-tech jacket for like $10. Search on amazon.com for “el strip” or “el tape”. Attach with a strong fabric glue like E6000

John Graham
John Graham
6 years ago

Could you at least provide a link to the company page?

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