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Wild Ceepo Shadow-R SideFork turns conventional fork design on its head

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Ceepo puts it pretty bluntly. The fork on your bike is not aero. How can you make it more aerodynamic? Well, you can start by turning it on its side, sort of. More accurately, you can turn the fork into a sort of wheel shroud that features a horizontal main strut that holds the wheel in place.

Wild Ceepo Shadow-R SideFork turns conventional fork design on its head

Wild Ceepo Shadow-R SideFork turns conventional fork design on its head

That horizontal strut attaches to a carbon semi-circle on either end, which is tucked inline with the front tire for a more slippery profile.

Wild Ceepo Shadow-R SideFork turns conventional fork design on its head

Wild Ceepo Shadow-R SideFork turns conventional fork design on its head

The design is said to help eliminate leading edges from not just the fork but the rest of the frame thanks to the redirected wind. The orientation of the fork shelters the front hub as well which Ceepo claims improves the aero benefit further. While no wind tunnel test results or figures are provided, Ceepo does show some CFD images which seem to corroborate their claims at a visual level.

It also claims to have a ride comfort component since the wheel is fork is free to flex up and down more than a traditional road fork.

Wild Ceepo Shadow-R SideFork turns conventional fork design on its head

The SideFork as Ceepo calls it, is part of the integrated design of the new Shadow-R triathlon bike which is obviously not UCI legal.

Wild Ceepo Shadow-R SideFork turns conventional fork design on its head Wild Ceepo Shadow-R SideFork turns conventional fork design on its head

From the top or the bottom, the Shadow-R still seems to have a fairly wide profile, but that’s mostly limited to the center section around the hubs and drivetrain. Based on the 1,450g weight of the fork alone, it sounds like it must have a lot of aero benefit to justify that much weight. Combined with the 40T high modulus carbon frame that clocks in at 2,230g, you have a 3,680g frame weight – although that does include an integrated tool and bento box. The frame is built to accommodate flat mount disc brakes, most drive trains, and also many stems and bars on the market. The Shadow-R will also be available in a non-SideFork version called the Shadow. Pricing and availability is TBA.

Specs

Compatible groupset:

  • Shimano di2
  • Sram E-Tap
  • Sram 1By (cable or electric)
  • FSA electric
  • It will accept most stems and bars on the market. Oval front chainrings up to 56 all the way down to compact size due to our twin position front derailleur hanger.

 

Truncated Airfoil Tubes:

  • Stiffer, lighter aero tubes.

Integrated Tool Box and Bento Box

Lowered BB:

  • For improved high-speed stability and better overall aerodynamics
  • BB EVO386.

Brakes:

  • 12 mm thru axle Flat mount brakes Hydraulic or cable.

Max tire clearance:

  • 28 tires with room to spare.

Reversible Seat Post:

  • For a wide range of saddle adjustability.

Double seat clamp:

  • Wedge and collar is designed to prevent slips and makes it easy to remove your seatpost without losing its position.

Removable front derailleur hanger:

  • Hi and Lo position.

Head Set:

  • 1-1/8” – 1-1/4”

Frame:

  • 100% 40T high-modulus carbon frame
  • 2,230g Frame (M size)
  • 1,450g Fork

ceepo.com

 

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26 Comments
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CW
CW
5 years ago

Jump on board the shadow-r and jump every shark in existence.

Celest Greene
Celest Greene
5 years ago

I think that what we have here is a need/should disconnect.

haromania
haromania
5 years ago

I would love to ride that thing!!! Serious, how do you not want to throw a leg over that?

Poopyhead
Poopyhead
5 years ago

Can I put a motor on/in it?!? I’m not into tt bikes but it does look pretty cool and I respect the integrated fender.

Larry Falk
Larry Falk
5 years ago

Wonder how it handles going down a hill? Or turning? (Maybe in Tri they don’t do either of these things?)

JBikes
JBikes
5 years ago
Reply to  Larry Falk

Why would it handle bad downhill or turning? The HTA is technically unaffected by the design and it is basically a conventional fork that routes around the tire rather then over the top. If the “fork” assembly is stiff enough (and I don’t see why it couldn’t be) it’ll handle like any other bike with similar geometry.

Shenandoah
Shenandoah
5 years ago
Reply to  JBikes

Stiffness? Indurain tried a similar fork for his hour record and lack of stability at high speed.

JBikes
JBikes
5 years ago
Reply to  Shenandoah

Yeah no advances in design or materials since then…

Shenandoah
Shenandoah
5 years ago
Reply to  JBikes

1) 90s monocoque were lacking many things (weight, compliance, friendlyness to manufacture) but not stiffness
2) this design is mechanically flexure than a straight fork and yes they may have overcome challenges… but yes it is a serious question mark.
3) possible that for intended use is irrelevant, limited turns, limited out of the saddle acceleration

Dinger
Dinger
5 years ago
Reply to  Shenandoah

Indurain’s fork was made before the current UCI testing certs were in place. Material and assumed construction methods are all unknowns so we have no way of knowing if it was stiff or not.

A challenge this design has is that the lateral support of the wheel depends on the torsional stiffness of the horizontal moment it’s attached to + the arced moments reaching from its end to the steerer assembly. Given its finished weight & the overall size of the component, I have a hard time believing it is sufficient for good handling.

Greg
Greg
5 years ago

Been drawing forks like this for tri bikes since high school, early 90s. Glad someone finally made one.

Chris
Chris
5 years ago

Too bad it’s not a new idea. Pinarello did a prototype horizontal fork for Indurain 20 years ago.

Mark
Mark
5 years ago

Somewhere, Grant Peterson is livid that a tri bike company made a bike with an integrated fender before he could.

nopers is bopes
nopers is bopes
5 years ago

is it way faster? yup
is it way uglier? yup

Kieselguhr Kid
Kieselguhr Kid
5 years ago

(deleted)

blahblahblah
blahblahblah
5 years ago

Pinarello made a fork like that in the 90’s for Indurain, it got banned i think

Shenandoah
Shenandoah
5 years ago
Reply to  blahblahblah

Lack of stability linked to lack of stiffness

FFM
FFM
5 years ago

The leading edge diagrams are very misleading.

BilllB
BilllB
5 years ago

The “leading edge” picture need clarification. How can the “fender” and blunt nose to be leading edges?

Adilos Nave
Adilos Nave
5 years ago

I think it’s actually pretty cool! I’m surprised they didn’t do a full bayonette in front of the head-tube. My guess it was to allow for the ‘fork’ to be used on all frame sizes. Props to them for taking a big risk! Didn’t go so well for diamond back though.

luggednut
5 years ago

Love the profile photos with no pedals or rider, definitely the most aero bike you can ghost-ride.

Patrick
Patrick
5 years ago
Alvis
Alvis
5 years ago

Toe clearance?

Phil
Phil
5 years ago
Reply to  Alvis

Toe clearance is what I thought of also. It’s already an issue with the tire alone on some frames. Adding all that around the tire is definitely going to give less clearance to anyone with moderate to large feet.

OriginalMarkV
OriginalMarkV
5 years ago
Reply to  Alvis

not going to be an issue with front-center dimensions of 596 to 640mm….unless maybe you are a member of the Midfoot-Cleat Cult and have sasquatch feet.

Dinger
Dinger
5 years ago

Seems like they need to be reminded that the entire front wheel is a leading edge, as are the handlebars and even the back half of the wheels (in crosswind over 10*). It’s as though they left out everything from the crank to the bottom of the saddle in their CFD model and figured nobody would notice.

Also, the fork is so heavy that it’d be easy to miss that the frame is 2,230gm (that’s almost 5lbs in the new money, folks..) without it. I’m an aero advocate, but even I must concede that this thing is simply too heavy.

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