QR Brands-1

In an expansive investigation stemming off of the recent recall of over 1 million quick releases on Trek bikes, 13 more companies (that represent a total of 17 brands), that have used the same style quick release on bikes with disc brakes between 1998 and present are coming forward and issuing a voluntary recall through the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and the Bicycle Product Suppliers Association (BPSA).

Take a quick look past the break to see diagrams and a video to see if this affects you, and what the big S is offering their affected customers for their trouble…

IMG_9437IMG_9438

The bottom QR is the new replacement quick release. Note how the one on the bottom stops much earlier when fully open than the one on the top.

IMG_9427

Here is how far the replacement quick release opens which is far from coming within contact of the brake’s rotor. The diagrams below show you what exactly to look for and how to easily test for it by using just a standard #2 pencil.

disc-brake-QR-diagram1 disc-brake-QR-diagram2 disc-brake-QR-diagram3

So far only 2 incidents have been reported as a result to the quick release interfering with the front brake’s disc with only one of those reporting injuries. As an incentive, Specialized will offer customers a gift of approximately US$20 value in addition to the replacement QR and labor. Contact your local Specialized retailer for details.

QuickReleaseRecall.com

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RAPHA
RAPHA
6 years ago

wow we are a sad sad race

Seraph
6 years ago

These companies must realize that coming forward this late in the game after Trek already had a recall a year ago makes them look like a**holes.

David
David
6 years ago

Why not just have the QR lever on the drive side? Simple solution. No issues with rotor clearance, much easier to operate due to more space. Just try it.

Gonzo the Great
Gonzo the Great
6 years ago

Oh no! The lawyer bought a bike with disk brakes now! Prepare for him mounting the front wheel backwards and noticing it going down a hill with his rear brake failing! Soon disk brake front hubs will be required by law to have a fool-proof key-in interface with all matching fork dropouts!

Gunnstein
Gunnstein
6 years ago

Or, you can put the lever on the right side of the hub. (Assuming it doesn’t open far enough to hit the spokes.)

Ape escape
Ape escape
6 years ago

I think there should be no recall and this should be a test of evolution. If you get injured or die because of this you had nothing to offer the human race to begin with, good riddance.

Quinn
Quinn
6 years ago

all the bikes wheels I have dealt with in the past 10 year have this “bad”quick release, I can’t recall ever having a problem.

Drunkatwork
Drunkatwork
6 years ago

You can’t recall stupid. People are going to find ways to hurt themselves no matter how fool-proof a product becomes.

Biff
Biff
6 years ago

“I’m proud of my invention, but I’m sad it’s used by idiots.” Tullio Campagnolo

Andy
Andy
6 years ago

It’s ironic that the first illustration shows an improperly closed QR.

Honestly, I have never liked quick releases. Sure they work fine, but they are too easy to use wrong.

Tad Dickman
Tad Dickman
6 years ago

So they are replacing the side enclosed cam QR’s which have been proven to have better clamping force, with a cheaper exposed cam QR? Sheldon would not be happy. http://www.sheldonbrown.com/skewers.html#choices

Slow Joe Crow
Slow Joe Crow
6 years ago

And once again the many must suffer for the willful stupidity of the few. The big WTF in this is people thinking this was how to use a QR.
The possible bright side here is that you can’t make this kind of a mistake with a through axle fork so bike companies may start putting them on all disk braked bikes.

John
John
6 years ago

@Andy, what’s ironic is that you don’t realize that first picture shows a QR design that won’t open so far that the lever could come in contact with the rotor.

Strawberry Fields
Strawberry Fields
6 years ago

As a lawyer who squeezes into my spandex manties one leg at a time like everyone else I can say most of us legal folk who ride bikes know how to use a quick release. However, as a human who sometimes doesn’t notice that my socks don’t match until after lunch, who has accidentally left my keys in the door, and who once locked my bike to a bike rack before remembering I hadn’t brought my keys with me to unlock it, I can say people who know better often forget or fail to do that which they know they’re supposed to do. Having a quick release that can have you flying chin first into the gravel when a safer alternative exists and is readily available is a bad thing, fixing it is good.

Darwin
Darwin
6 years ago

Soon Darwinism will be no more :-[

GoVegan
GoVegan
6 years ago

Glad I have Hope or Dura Ace skewers!

The Conductor
The Conductor
6 years ago

And car tires are still attached with simple lug nuts…amazing the lawyers have not gone after those!

Andy, if “you” can’t master a QR, “you” don’t belong near anything with wheels.

AdventuresAnonymous
AdventuresAnonymous
6 years ago

Andy said first “illustration”, not picture, so I think he’s referring to the QR being closed up against the fork leg, as opposed to in front of the fork leg as would be proper (and more safe due to increased cam action, and easier to use due to finger clearance for opening).

Yardsale
Yardsale
6 years ago

So I’m just riding along and my front quick release suddenly flips all the way open…? I’m pretty sure I don’t remember that ever happening before….

Xris
Xris
6 years ago

Such a tiny thing that only a few people have experienced leads to millions upon millions of dollars being wasted in trying to fix an almost non-existent problem. Welcome to my life for the next year and a bit.

jimmy dean
jimmy dean
6 years ago

Slow Joe, how is anyone being made to suffer through this recall? People will be safer, and no one else will notice. It’s really worth being upset over that? I guess everyone should just know how to do everything right all of time, eh?

Emily
Emily
6 years ago

I’m really confused as to how someone can be riding with the QR that wide open?

John
John
6 years ago

@AdventuresAnonymous: The caption below that first picture, “Here is how far the replacement quick release opens which is far from coming within contact of the brake’s rotor.”

Again, it shows a QR not capable of being opened so far that the lever could possibly come in contact with the rotor. That’s what the recall is about, not whether a QR can be tightened backward.

Matthew
Matthew
6 years ago

@Slow Joe Crow: And for bikes with a 9mm axle that won’t take a through axle skewer, the solution is a skewer along the lines of the DT Swiss RWS. Never had a problem with loss of clamping on any of mine (three bikes), and the lever doesn’t pivot so it can’t get caught. Plus you can place it drive side or non-drive side with no interference issues.

Jack
Jack
6 years ago

So far there’s been 2 incidents and only one was injured.
And it leads to a massive recall. What is a pathtic society we live in.
IMO the identity of the 2idiots and the lawers behind them shoud be made public.
AND whoever came up with the lawer-lip idea too.
They deserve a special place in the Inferno Hereafter.

Andy
Andy
6 years ago

AdventuresAnonymous is correct. I was referring to the illustration, not the photograph, in which the qr is against the fork leg preventing it from being fully, and properly, closed. The fact that the majority, and even the creator of the image and (apparently) people behind this recall, don’t recognize this as an issue simply reinforces my point. The standard quick release simply isn’t intuitive enough for most people, even if it is a elegant device that works well when used correctly.

thorn_in_side
6 years ago

I guess the other companies finally realized how profitable it was for Trek to “recall” all those precious QR skewers, driving customers to their dealers when those same people had not entered a single bicycle shop in a decade.

John
John
6 years ago

The first illustration shows the QR closed next to the fork stanchions, which is the way most people close their front QR levers, because they believe the lever is less likely to accidentally come open. (The “Affected front disc brake area:” graphic.)

The second illustration shows how the recalled QR levers can be opened so far that they can come in contact with the rotor. (The “Replace your skewer if:” graphic.)

The third illustration show replacement QR levers which have a built-in “stop” in the design, and can’t be opened past approx. 180° from the closed position. There should be a 6mm gap between the rotor and a fully opened replacement QR. (The “Your skewer is fine if:” graphic.)

6mm is about the width of an average pencil, which is why you see the pencil in the drawing. You could also use a 6mm allen wrench, or a caliper, or any of a number of other tools in your toolbox to measure that clearance, but most people who don’t have a set of bike tools are likely to pencils around the house.

That said, using thru-axles for disc brakes bikes would solve this problem, as well as a few others (rotor/caliper alignment during wheel changes, for starters).

MickT
MickT
6 years ago

of course, when you consider the direction the wheel turns, versus where the QR lever could possibly interact with the wheel/brake disk, the lever will be bounced out rather than caught in the brake disk – unless youre going backwards, or your brakes and QR are on the wrong side of the bike…. look at the same design of QR, been used on road bikes for aeons, with the same supposed “risk” (but getting caught in spokes not brake disk) and in 30+ years I have NEVER heard of one getting caught….

The bigger problem I see is not the possibility of QR/wheel interactions, but if the QR opens like pictured you better be able to ride a unicycle……

ZigaK
ZigaK
6 years ago

It’s a ploy to get general public aware that qr are dangerous. Very dangerous.
I can imagine the conversations in few years time: You’re still riding qr bike? Woow that’s really dangerous. You should totally buy a bike with through axles pronto.

WG
WG
6 years ago

A new brain should be supplied free in the package.

Bohica
Bohica
6 years ago

After this gets “corrected” may we can find a way to keep riders from wearing their helmets backwards. It only took 1500 years to get every one to wear their pants with the zipper in front. Except Kris Kross. Then we can tackle bibs over jerseys. The bounds are endless!

Rocky Gardeno
Rocky Gardeno
6 years ago

Not unlike so many other legal issues-
Once there is a precedence set any brand who does not follow is left liable, sad but true. This isn’t a money grab by the bike industry but a reaction to our litigious nation.
If you want to point out ridiculous attempts from the bike industry to make money, 27.5, 27.5+ and 29+ would be far higher on the list

Itchy Bon
Itchy Bon
6 years ago

Obviously I’m in the vocal minority, but maybe it’s a good thing to change a design if it’s been proven to lead to potentially serious injuries? I know it probably boggles the mind of the average bikerumor commenters, but you are the minority of the cycling population. Most people don’t know any better or care. And, it turns out, the cycling industry has a responsibility to make cycling safe and therefore fun for their customers so we can all keep wasting money overpriced crap.

Eric Hansen
Eric Hansen
6 years ago

On one hand, QRs are crap, and crappy QRs are crappier! On the other hand, they work, and humanity will always build a better idiot.

The ONLY good thing that can come out of this is quicker adoption of TAs.

NotAMachinist
NotAMachinist
6 years ago

Does this mean that there will be boxes of free enclosed cam-actuated skewers at bike shops across the country?

@Strawberry Fields: When your life, or at least front teeth depend on you doing something correctly, DO IT CORRECTLY. And check that you did it correctly. Every time. Yes that means closing the quick release, ensuring the tension is correct, lifting the front wheel and making sure it doesn’t fall out. Every. Time.

Frippolini
Frippolini
6 years ago

Perhaps I’m the biggest idiot out there, but wouldn’t the issue be solved just by flipping the QR to the other side, e.g. put the QR handle lever on the left side of the fork instead of the right???

As a side note, who the f**k rides with their quick release open to the extent it can run into the brake disc??? No wonder it’s only been 2 cases out of what must be millions of bikes that has been sold since the “problem started”. Being totally honest about it, the root of the problem actually started when mankind’s process of natural selection got interrupted by the invention of “unrestricted-get-rich-easy-and-quick-lawsuits”. What’s next… national parks will be sued because branches falling of trees could potentially end up between the spokes of someone’s wheel and cause a crash???

Rotomon
Rotomon
6 years ago

Half of the customers who encountered this needs recalled to the womb. The whole recall is a complete waste of money. Time better spent educating people how a skewer works imo.

Groghunter
Groghunter
6 years ago

FWIW, my understanding of the problem isn’t that skewers are popping open, but that people are so unable to understand the concept of a cam, that they use the skewer lever to just spin the skewer tight, without ever actually flipping the lever. & that while there’s been very few injuries, it is something that bike shops see constantly.

notmikeb
notmikeb
6 years ago

There is a simple test for this.

1. Go look at your bicycle.
2. Is your quick release tightened properly? Skip to step 3. If not skip to step 4.
3. Good job. Go ride.
4.Go find a large rock.
5. Hit yourself in head with it.
6. Repeat step 5 until no longer a burden on the human race

Jsgriggs
Jsgriggs
6 years ago

I ride a specialized secteur w/ disc brakes and had the quick release let go and slam into the rotor while riding ~22mph. This was on a Houston road, so you know that the conditions weren’t favorable. I was lucky that I was able to snap out of the pedals and get my feet down. Rotor was trashed. But I was safe. Riders behind me in the pace line managed to avoid contact.

The issue you run into on the front discs is that is you over tighten the quick release then you could cause the rotor to rub the caliper. For a lot of riders that have to take the front off to store their bike this causes a constant balancing act of over-/under- tightening.

That said I just bought a new bike and made sure to get one with disc brakes again.

Jeff
Jeff
6 years ago

I agree this is completely stupid. But then we all “know”. I just got a bike assembled by a LBS (against my better judgement) and the hyd. brake line was run out side the fork, the front skewer was pointed straight down and too loose and the rear wheel was crooked in the rear dropouts and the skewer was pointing up. I asked the manager if he had checked out the assembly and he said yes. I shut up and took it home and fixed all the issues myself. So even those in the bike industry can be eligible for a Darwin award at our expense. But overall it is a shame what society has devolved to…

haoledude
haoledude
6 years ago

Tullio is just shaking his head.

Lagunatri
Lagunatri
6 years ago

Wow, I’m a mechanically-challenged chick and figured this out. Maybe they need to start making adult-sized tricycles, with a warning, of course, to not put all one’s weight at the back lest someone pop a wheelie and knock some sense into their thick skull.