Jamis didn’t have much to say about this prototype TT bike sitting front and center in their booth, but the intent is obvious – to make the Silber Pro Cycling Team go faster. As much as possible, the bike integrates components to keep them out of the wind stream. Brakes are tucked and covered, and the handlebar integrates into the stem as a single piece to create a much smoother front end and easy cable hiding…

prototype Jamis TT bike for Silber pro cycling team

prototype Jamis TT bike for Silber pro cycling team

Brake cables remain hidden inside the bar and stem completely, while shift levers duck out of the extensions and directly into the stem. SRAM’s eTap system would mean zero visible cables.

prototype Jamis TT bike for Silber pro cycling team

prototype Jamis TT bike for Silber pro cycling team

prototype Jamis TT bike for Silber pro cycling team

Front brakes weren’t installed on this prototype, but all you’d really see are the pads. The caliper arms are hidden behind the fairing. They kept the rim brakes because, for now, the UCI still hasn’t officially made disc brakes legal and their team needs to have this on the starting ramp for major races.

prototype Jamis TT bike for Silber pro cycling team

Another fairing hides the rear caliper. Public retail release of the bike is TBD, it’s still in testing.

JamisBikes.com

14 COMMENTS

  1. Aren’t fairings that have no other function than improving aerodynamics (also) illegal according to UCI regulations? Or is that not on TT bikes?

    • They’ll classify it as a structural fairing. Somehow that skirts the UCI rule book enough that they let it pass.

    • BMC did the fairing thing on the front of the TImeMachine and gave some BS excuse that it was “structural” or something and it was approved. Probably the same thing here.

    • If they’re made to, they’ll just fudge it for race legality. In the grand scheme, they shouldn’t care. UCI points scoring riders generally don’t buy bikes, amateur triathletes do.

    • Covers are legal even if they are not structural. As long as everything fits in the boxes. Plenty of TT bikes with covers out there.

      • I think the “boxes” are a bit looser when your pockets are full. Looking at you, Pinarello Bolide and Team Sky. That is a blatant fairing over the rear brake that serves zero structure support. And then there is the Cervelo P5 with the extremely massive seat-tube/top-tube junction. I’ve worked on the UCI drawings in the past for getting them approved and these guys must be using a 4th Dimension to get things to fit inside those restrictive boxes.

  2. “Jamis didn’t have much to say about this prototype TT bike” – because as T30 said it’s a Dedacciai frame.

  3. unless SRAM released an update to their TT configuration for the E-tap… the need for the blip box could actually make the set-up worse if they haven’t designed in a solution to store that large device elegantly and not totally wireless as stated.

  4. Wait. What’s this? Didn’t realise people actually did this sort of bike. It seems silly and prone to crashing upon a rider attempting to mount.

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