A lot of time and effort usually goes into a professional bike fit. Or maybe, you’ve just spent months fine tuning your fit on your own and finally have it dialed in. Whatever the case, if it’s time to transfer that fit to a new bike, VeloAngle has a better way.

Not only has VeloAngle developed an entire new tool for the job, they’ve also created a new technique. While most fitters are accustomed to measuring things in terms of X – Y, VeloAngle claims that this requires two separate measurements with the possibility of error. Instead, VeloAngle uses what’s referred to as the Polar measurement, or length and angle of touch points relative to the fixed point on the bottom bracket. The result is the ability to measure between two points in a single step.

VeloAngle dials in better bike fit transfers with new measurement tool and technique

Additionally, the VeloAngle Pro has an Alt Zero function that sets the reference plane at wheel contact points or axles, even if the bike isn’t level. This allows for the position to be recreated even if the bike is in a stand, rack, or other situation that isn’t level.

VeloAngle dials in better bike fit transfers with new measurement tool and technique

Additional accessories are available to allow for saddle height, setback, and tilt to be measured all at once. The theme of the tool seems to be removing the possibility of error introduced when you have to reposition the tool or perform measurements separately. Accessories also include an expanding crank adapter or Shimano Hollowtech II adapters to provide a fixed measurement point at the BB which makes the saddle and handlebar adapter straps unnecessary.


VeloAngle dials in better bike fit transfers with new measurement tool and technique

Measurements can be plugged into their app which converts X – Y measurements to Polar, and it allows you to log information such as the exact components used in the build of multiple bikes. Currently, the app is provided as part of a subscription with both limited and unlimited plans. The limited plans have a set number of sessions that can be saved, though limited sessions can be run. Pricing varies from a $14 one month trial to a year of unlimited for $59.

 

VeloAngle dials in better bike fit transfers with new measurement tool and technique

Available in two models, the VeloAngle Pro (top) includes the Digi-Pas 180s digital inclinometer and sells for $279.

Contents

  • VeloAngle with inclinometer
  • Saddle Adapter assembly
  • Handlebar Adapter Assembly
  • BB/Crank Centers (small and large)
  • Engineered reusable packaging with organizer

Specifications

  • VeloAngle measurement range: 648 – 1158 mm, resolution 1 mm
  • Saddle adapter measurement range: 100 – 300 mm, resolution 1 mm
  • Angle measurement range: +/- 90°, resolution 0.05°

Materials

  • Main Body: 5052 H32 Aluminum, brushed and clear anodized
  • Molded Housings: PC/ABS engineering thermoplastic and engineered thermoplastic elastomer for high impact resistance and molding accuracy
  • Molded Bushing and Shim: Acetal Copolymer for high creep resistance and low friction
  • Guide Tubes: 304 stainless steel tubing centerless ground to eliminate clearance with mating housings and ensure accurate measurements.
  • Measuring Scales: Both main and saddle adapter scales are laminated with a 3mm Lexan overlay for the ultimate in wear resistance.

VeloAngle dials in better bike fit transfers with new measurement tool and technique

VeloAngle dials in better bike fit transfers with new measurement tool and technique

The VeloAngle Enthusiast removes the digital inclinometer and instead relies on the user’s own cell phone to run a number of apps to provide the angle reading. Otherwise, it offers the same functionality as the Pro.

Contents

  • VeloAngle
  • Saddle Adapter assembly
  • Handlebar Adapter Assembly
  • BB/Crank Centers (small and large)
  • Engineered reusable packaging with organizer

Specifications

  • VeloAngle measurement range: 648 – 1158 mm, resolution 1 mm
  • Saddle adapter measurement range: 100 – 300 mm, resolution 1 mm

Materials

  • Main Body: 5052 H32 Aluminum, brushed and clear anodized
  • Molded Housings: PC/ABS engineering thermoplastic and engineered thermoplastic elastomer for high impact resistance and molding accuracy
  • Molded Bushing and Shim: Acetal Copolymer for high creep resistance and low friction
  • Guide Tubes: 304 stainless steel tubing centerless ground to eliminate clearance with mating housings and ensure accurate measurements.
  • Measuring Scales: Both main and saddle adapter scales are laminated with a 3mm Lexan overlay for the ultimate in wear resistance.

VeloAngle is now fulfilling individual orders through their website with additional support and full production capability on the way.

veloangle.com

13 COMMENTS

  1. All is well except for one detail: why on Earth would one use a smartphone as a leveling device? The good old fashioned bull’s eye spirit level may not be the most high-tech solution, but it just works. An electronic built-in accelerometer may be fine if it is properly calibrated. Never have I had a phone that showed a flat surface when lying on one, which makes it pretty useless for a measuring device.

    • Apparently some researchers who actually studied accuracy of smart phone angle measurement had different results than you. Can you quantify this uselessness you discovered?

      • Sure, why not?
        1. Unless you state what researchers were involved and in what peer reviewed journal they published their results, your statement is of no value as it is just argumentum ad verecundiam.
        2. I have checked the specification of a production accelerometer, InvenSense ICM-20600 as it is a currently produced accelerometer aimed at mobile market. I chose this as the phone pictured is a Samsung and this company used InvenSense acceleroemeters in their products before. The spec sheet actually says that the zero-g output in all axes is up to 65 mg (mili-g), which translates into about 4 degree error when it comes to measuring the gravity acceleration vector in each axis. Pretty big number when it comes to bike fit, isn’t it?

        Now the problem with using phones as measuring devices is that they were never designed to be them. For a true measuring device to be accurate and reliable it must be properly calibrated and used and the measuring error must be known. Now there are two kinds of measurement errors – random and systematic. A systematic error can be corrected if the measurement conditions are known and is less of a problem. A more severe one is the random error which cannot be corrected against. Taking this into measuring angles with a smartphone – you cannot guarantee that you hold a phone in exactly the same way every time, nor can you make sure that the phone axes are the same as accelerometer axes.

  2. Appreciate the feedback. Particularity valuable for a new product that takes a different approach.

    – Bubble levels are simple and effective when you want things plumb or level. Leveling the Romin saddle in the photo in the traditional manner by laying a level across the entire top surface would leave most people unhappy as the upturn at the back would point the nose up. VeloAngle’s saddle adapter allows the user to decide where on the saddle they want to use as a reference point for both measurement relative to the BB and for tilt. Most people don’t like their saddles perfectly level and being able to measure tenths of a degree is valuable in replicating saddle feel. Actually the saddle in the photo is not level. I like it 0.8 deg. nose down measured from where the saddle’s widest. I zeroed the phone for the photo. A mistake in retrospect because it gives the impression the objective is always to make it level.

    – Smart phones are capable of accurate angle measurement. The app that’s used is likely the bigger variable. Good ones have a calibration routine.

    – The subscription-based app is not required for use of the tool.

  3. I don’t see how one point to point measurement can capture both saddle height and saddle setback accurately. A pnt to pnt measurement of, say, 75cm can be achieved with different combinations of saddle height and setback. How do you get around that?

  4. Geoff
    You can get setback because the saddle height is determined from a location on the saddle you select. The saddle adapter has a scale that gives you the distance from the saddle tip to that location. So the setback is the X axis distance BB-to-Saddle minus the reading on the saddle scale.

    • Thanks for the feedback. Having studied it a little closer, I now understand better how it works. I think I’ll be giving you a call tomorrow.

      Geoff

  5. Wanted to follow-up with a link to the instructional video we produced that covers some of the questions raised relative to the use and accuracy of level and angle measurement apps. As noted in an earlier comment, our admittedly limited survey found no significant differences in smart phone sensor capability. How those sensors are utilized is dependent on the app and the type of measurement, and this is where performance differentiation can be found. The following video covers calibration and use of the Enthusiast model. If you’re only interested in the final result skip to 8:30.
    https://youtu.be/oRGD3fhhWV0

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