If you’re really trying to be seen out there on the roads, you probably have more than one light. Maybe a rear flasher, front flasher, and sometimes even something on the helmet or your bag. Making sure all of those lights are turned on and properly set can be a bit of a chore, so wouldn’t it be great if you could control all of the lights with a single button? That’s exactly what the Cat Eye SYNC collection delivers.

EB18: Control all your lights with one button through Cat Eye Sync light family

EB18: Control all your lights with one button through Cat Eye Sync light family

Split into three categories, the SYNC system starts with the Core headlight at 500 lumens. This light contains the main power button which will turn on or off all of the other SYNC lights. It’s also compatible with the Cat Eye app which allows you to customized the modes of each light. The built in indicator also allows you to see the pairing and battery information of all the other lights.

EB18: Control all your lights with one button through Cat Eye Sync light family

Next is the SYNC Kinetic which is a 40 lumen rear light that also has Kinetic mode for active brake lighting. The light can be paired with the SYNC Core to control it through the front switch.

EB18: Control all your lights with one button through Cat Eye Sync light family

The third part of the equation is the SYNC Wearable which like the name would imply, can be worn on your helmet, clothes, bags, etc. This is a 30 lumen light which also has a Kinetic ability – though only when paired with SYNKinetic mode.

In total, you can pair up to seven SYNC lights which are all controlled through the Core light or the Cat Eye SYNC App. The app allows you to synchronize all of the lights so that they flash in unison, all activate in kinetic mode, and allows you to customize mode levels, and figure out which lights need charging. Each light is USB rechargeable with claimed weights of 94g (Core), 21g (Wearable), and 43g (Kinetic).

Prices

  • SYNC Core – $90
  • SYNC Kinetic – $70
  • SYNC Wearable – $70
  • SYNC Core and Kinetic twin-pack – $150

EB18: Control all your lights with one button through Cat Eye Sync light family

Cat Eye also had a few new products like the Volt 1700. This super bright 1700 lumen light has an impressive 2hr runtime on high from the self contained battery, or up to 15hrs at 200 lumens. Weighing in at 256.3g, the light has a fast recharging circuit and Hyper Constant mode.

EB18: Control all your lights with one button through Cat Eye Sync light family

To mount their lights and computers, Cat Eye has a new Out Front Bracket 2 which is meant to hold both a light and a computer. According to Cat Eye, it is compatible with lights and computers which use the H-34N bracket.

EB18: Control all your lights with one button through Cat Eye Sync light family

EB18: Control all your lights with one button through Cat Eye Sync light family

Last but not least was this interesting take on a cycling computer called the Cat Eye Quick. The simple computer uses an analog wireless speed sensor to compute current, average, and max speed, trip distance, total distance, and moving time. Built with an inverted LCD display that is integrated into an out front mount, you get the look and performance of higher end computers with a simple, stylish design at $65.

cateye.com

5 comments

  1. coreying on

    This appears to be another proprietary wireless light syncing standard (assumption since the article makes no mention of ANT+). It’d be fantastic if more light companies would use ANT+ so that it can use the existing features in Garmin head units, and maybe convince Wahoo and others to put the feature into their own head units. Yet another proprietary light network standard like the above does nothing to help consumers in the long run.

    Reply
    • David Rosenthal on

      Would agree, the industry needs to come up with a bluetooth standard especially in regards to safety related items like this. I hope we can have it to where I can have a tail mounted camera that is activated when my radar sensor picks up a fast moving close car approaching and off the rest of the time to save battery/memory. Currently not one manufacturer really has all the pieces to do this cleanly (maybe garmin although I’m not a huge fan of their devices) and if there was an agreed upon standard all this stuff could work with each other and possibly save lives through automation it won’t work if I have to buy into an ecosystem though.

      Reply
  2. Garrett on

    Lupine has already done it better with their low energy Bluetooth switch. It lets you dim the bar mounted and headlamp in unison. Great when you don’t want to BLIND someone in the opposite direction.

    Reply

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